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Untitled. The Ruined Neighborhoods Burned by the Alberta Wildfire - The Atlantic. Alberta wildfire explodes across forests: 'in no way is this under control' The devastating wildfire in northern Alberta could double in size by Sunday as officials frantically worked to evacuate thousands of people still trapped north of the oil city of Fort McMurray.

Alberta wildfire explodes across forests: 'in no way is this under control'

“In no way is this fire under control,” Rachel Notley, the premier of Alberta, said on Saturday, almost one week after the fire first ignited in a remote forested area of the province. “The weather today is going to be significantly worse for fighting fires,” she added, pointing to the temperatures upwards of 82F (28C) and winds gusting up to 25mph (40kmh). “Officials tell us the fire may double in size in the forested areas today. As well, it may actually reach the Saskatchewan border.” The size of the fire was estimated at 156,000 hectares (385,000 acres) on Saturday but could reach as much as 300,000 hectares by Sunday, officials said. Around 12,000 people were moved south in mass airlifts that began on Thursday. Forecasts show a 30% chance of showers in the area on Sunday. Devastating Alberta wildfire 'probably started by human activity', police say. The wildfire that raged through northern Alberta and forced the frantic evacuation of more than 90,000 people was probably caused by humans, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said on Tuesday.

Devastating Alberta wildfire 'probably started by human activity', police say

After more than six weeks of investigation, police have determined the fire did not start naturally. “Wildfire investigators for the province of Alberta have established that the fire was most likely the result of human activity, having ruled out lightning as a probable cause,” the RCMP said in a statement. Investigators are now exploring whether the cause is linked to any sort of criminal offence. The fire was sparked on 1 May near a wilderness area popular with outdoor enthusiasts and police are asking anyone who was there in the days before the fire to come forward. Potential causes linked to humans, said Travis Fairweather of Alberta Wildfire, include campfires left unattended, debris caught in recreational vehicles and downed power lines.

Financial impact of Fort McMurray wildfire reaches almost $10 billion. An assessment of the total financial effect of last spring’s Fort McMurray wildfire is pegging the direct and indirect costs of the blaze at almost $10 billion.

Financial impact of Fort McMurray wildfire reaches almost $10 billion

The $9.9-billion figure includes the expense of replacing buildings and infrastructure, as well as lost income, profits and royalties in the oilsands and forestry industries, said MacEwan University economist Rafat Alam. It also includes early estimates on indirect costs such as environmental damage, lost timber, and physical and mental-health treatment for residents and firefighters.

The estimate will go even higher, Alam said Tuesday. “It’s not fully done yet. More data kept coming and I’m sure it will keep coming in.” Alam said it can take up to 10 years to get a complete picture of everything that happened and what it cost. Earlier this year, insurers estimated they’d be paying out about $3.7 billion for damage caused by the blaze, which firefighters dubbed “the beast.”

Indirect costs are valued at $1 billion. Costs of Alberta wildfire reach $9.5 billion: Study - Article - BNN. EDMONTON -- An assessment of the total financial impact of last spring's Fort McMurray wildfire is pegging the direct and indirect costs of the blaze at almost $10 billion.

Costs of Alberta wildfire reach $9.5 billion: Study - Article - BNN

The $9.9-billion figure includes the expense of replacing buildings and infrastructure as well as lost income, profits and royalties in the oil sands and forestry industries, said MacEwan University economist Rafat Alam. It also includes early estimates on indirect costs such as environmental damage, lost timber and physical and mental-health treatment for residents and firefighters. The estimate will go even higher, Alam said Tuesday. "It's not fully done yet. More data kept coming and I'm sure it will keep coming in. " Alam said it can take up to 10 years to get a complete picture of everything that happened and what it cost. Earlier this year, insurers estimated they'd be paying out about $3.7 billion for damage caused by the blaze which firefighters came to call "the beast.

" Indirect costs are valued at $1 billion. Residents begin returning home after Los Angeles wildfire. MyFireWatch - Bushfire map information Australia.