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News Corp. Said to Consider Naming Chase Carey as CEO, Succeeding Murdoch. News Corp. is considering elevating Chief Operating Officer Chase Carey to chief executive officer to succeed Rupert Murdoch, people with knowledge of the situation said.

News Corp. Said to Consider Naming Chase Carey as CEO, Succeeding Murdoch

A decision hasn’t been made and a move depends in part on Murdoch’s performance today before the U.K. Parliament, the people, who weren’t authorized to speak publicly, said yesterday. Murdoch would remain chairman, the people said. Murdoch and his son James appeared today to discuss the company’s role in the alleged phone hacking of murder victims, members of the royal family and others by the News of the World, which was closed on July 10. The 80-year-old executive said he wasn’t considering resigning. “The News of the World is less than 1 percent of our company,” Murdoch told Parliament’s Culture, Media and Sport Committee. News Corp. News Corp deputy chairman, president and chief operating officer Charles "Chase" Carey. News Corp deputy chairman, president and chief operating officer Charles "Chase" Carey. Close Open. Does British Scandal Risk Murdoch's Hold On Empire? Hide captionNews Corp.

Does British Scandal Risk Murdoch's Hold On Empire?

CEO Rupert Murdoch (right), testifying alongside his son James, said his appearance Tuesday before a British parliamentary inquiry in London was "the most humble day of my life. " Parbul/AFP/Getty Images News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch (right), testifying alongside his son James, said his appearance Tuesday before a British parliamentary inquiry in London was "the most humble day of my life. " As News Corp. executives Rupert and James Murdoch gave testimony to members of a parliamentary panel in London on Tuesday, they were also speaking to a different audience: The people who own their company's shares and sit on its board. From the opening moments, Rupert Murdoch made clear that even in crisis, News Corp., while a publicly traded company, is very much propelled by the vision of one man.

"I'd just like to say one sentence: This is the most humble day in my life," he said. The problem for the Murdochs is fundamental. 'I Didn't Know Of It' "I didn't know of it. 'People ... Scandal Splinters the Murdoch Family Business. Phone Hacking Charges Spread to Other British Tabloids. Just when you though the phone hacking scandal was stabilizing, a fresh batch of journalists are blowing the whistle on even more British tabloids.

Phone Hacking Charges Spread to Other British Tabloids

After Prime Minister David Cameron declared to Parliament Wednesday that investigators would be naive to think that phone hacking happened only at News Corp. -owned papers, a number of journalists came forward with reports of phone hacking at News of the World's competitors. In addition to renewed interest in Jude Law's lawsuit against The Sun, the new reports venture beyond Murdoch's empire.

The New York Times reports: Five former journalists at The News of The World’s rival Sunday newspaper, The People, run by the Mirror group, said in interviews that they regularly witnessed hacking in that newsroom in the late 1990s to early 2000. RELATED: Why the Murdochs Are Second Guessing Their Escape Route Meanwhile, more details have been revealed about the Sean Hoare, the News of the World whistleblower who was found dead in his home on Monday.