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USGS Open-File Report 2015–1070: Incorporating Induced Seismicity in the 2014 United States National Seismic Hazard Model—Results of 2014 Workshop and Sensitivity Studies. Skip Links Open-File Report 2015–1070 By Mark D.

USGS Open-File Report 2015–1070: Incorporating Induced Seismicity in the 2014 United States National Seismic Hazard Model—Results of 2014 Workshop and Sensitivity Studies

Petersen, Charles S. Mueller, Morgan P. Moschetti, Susan M. Suggested citation: Petersen, M.D., Mueller, C.S., Moschetti, M.P., Hoover, S.M., Rubinstein, J.L., Llenos, A.L., Michael, A.J., Ellsworth, W.L., McGarr, A.F., Holland, A.A., and Anderson, J.G., 2015, Incorporating induced seismicity in the 2014 United States National Seismic Hazard Model—Results of 2014 workshop and sensitivity studies: U.S. ISSN 2331-1258 (online) Contents Acknowledgments Abstract Introduction Hazard Models for Induced Seismicity Seismic Hazard Products Suggested at the Workshop USGS Research Agenda for Induced Seismicity Hazard Studies Conclusions References Cited Appendix 1: Initial Likelihood Tests of Potential Seismicity-Rate Models for Induced Seismicity in Oklahoma, Southern Kansas and North-Central Texas Appendix 2: Recurrence Analysis in Recent (2001–14) Oklahoma Earthquakes Appendix 3: Ratio Maps for Figures 13 through 17 Skip Links Open-File Report 2015–1070 Contents.

Potentially induced earthquakes in Oklahoma, USA: Links between wastewater injection and the 2011 Mw 5.7 earthquake sequence. + Author Affiliations Significant earthquakes are increasingly occurring within the continental interior of the United States, including five of moment magnitude (Mw) ≥ 5.0 in 2011 alone.

Potentially induced earthquakes in Oklahoma, USA: Links between wastewater injection and the 2011 Mw 5.7 earthquake sequence

Concurrently, the volume of fluid injected into the subsurface related to the production of unconventional resources continues to rise. Here we identify the largest earthquake potentially related to injection, an Mw 5.7 earthquake in November 2011 in Oklahoma. The earthquake was felt in at least 17 states and caused damage in the epicentral region. What is fracking and why is it controversial? Drilling companies suggest trillions of cubic feet of shale gas may be recoverable from underneath parts of the UK through a process known as "fracking".

What is fracking and why is it controversial?

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a technique designed to recover gas and oil from shale rock. But how does it work and why is it controversial? What is fracking? Fracking is the process of drilling down into the earth before a high-pressure water mixture is directed at the rock to release the gas inside. Water, sand and chemicals are injected into the rock at high pressure which allows the gas to flow out to the head of the well. The process can be carried out vertically or, more commonly, by drilling horizontally to the rock layer and can create new pathways to release gas or can be used to extend existing channels. The term fracking refers to how the rock is fractured apart by the high pressure mixture.

Report Warns Of Human-Induced Earthquakes. A report on United States earthquake risk areas reveals what seismologists have gradually come to suspect: The interior states are now more likely to experience earth tremors than the famously quake-prone cities of the West Coast.

Report Warns Of Human-Induced Earthquakes

Most of the time, human activity is to blame, but the question remains—how much damage can human-induced earthquakes do? The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has for the first time attempted to estimate the scale of earth movement that human activities generate. It acknowledges that oil and gas drilling operations are setting off thousands of earthquakes. So far, however, these have done little damage, often being too small to even detect without sensitive equipment. However, the USGS warns that there is a danger of human-induced quakes with magnitudes as large as 7, the size of the 1989 disaster that killed 63 San Franciscans and did more than $5 billion dollars in damage. Oil and gas operations could trigger large earthquakes. The U.S.

Oil and gas operations could trigger large earthquakes

Geological Survey (USGS) has taken its first stab at quantifying the hazard from earthquakes associated with oil and gas development. The assessment, released in a preliminary report today, identifies 17 areas in eight states with elevated seismic hazard. And geologists now say that such induced earthquakes could potentially be large, up to magnitude 7, which is big enough to cause buildings to collapse and widespread damage.

The new bull’s-eyes on the map, regions such as central Oklahoma, have short-term hazards that are comparable to the those in traditional earthquake states, like California, says Mark Petersen, chief of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project in Golden, Colorado. “These earthquakes are occurring at a higher rate than ever before and pose a much greater threat to people living nearby,” he says. The report is a preliminary study that is going to be revised later this year, Petersen says. Promiscuous women cause earthquakes, Iran cleric says. Survivors of an earthquake search debris in Bam, Iran, in late 2003.

Promiscuous women cause earthquakes, Iran cleric says

That quake killed tens of thousands of people. "When promiscuity spreads, earthquakes increase," hard-line cleric says in videoVideo on YouTube apparently shows cleric leading Friday prayers in TehranIran suffers regular earthquakes, including one that killed tens of thousands in 2003 (CNN) -- Women who dress provocatively and tempt people into promiscuity are to blame for earthquakes, a leading Iranian hard-line cleric has apparently said.

The prayer leader, Hojatoleslam Kazim Sadeghi, says women and girls who "don't dress appropriately" spread "promiscuity in society. "