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Black Pullet. This design for an amulet comes from the Black Pullet grimoire.

Black Pullet

Embroider it upon blacksatin, and say "Nades, Suradis, Maniner", and a djinn is supposed to appear; tell the djinn "Sader, Prostas, Solaster", and the djinn will bring you your true love. Say "Mammes, Laher" when you tire of her. The Black Pullet (La poule noire) is a grimoire that proposes to teach the "science of magical talismans and rings", including the art of necromancy and Kabbalah.

It is believed to have been written in the 18th century[1] by an anonymous French officer who served in Napoleon's army. The text takes the form of a narrative centering on the French officer during the Egyptian expedition led by Napoleon (referred to here as the "genius") when his unit is suddenly attacked by Arab soldiers (Bedouins). The book itself contains information regarding the creation of certain magical properties, such as talismanic rings, amulets and the Black Pullet itself. See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Necronomicon. The Cats of Ulthar. "The Cats of Ulthar" is a short story written by American fantasy author H.

The Cats of Ulthar

P. Lovecraft in June 1920. Cosmicism. Cosmicism is the literary philosophy developed and used by the American writer H.


P. Lovecraft in his weird fiction.[1] Lovecraft was a writer of philosophically intense horror stories that involve occult phenomena like astral possession and alien miscegenation, and the themes of his fiction over time contributed to the development of this philosophy. Principles of cosmicism[edit] The philosophy of cosmicism states that there is no recognizable divine presence, such as a god, in the universe, and that humans are particularly insignificant in the larger scheme of intergalactic existence, and perhaps are just a small species projecting their own mental idolatries onto the vast cosmos, ever susceptible to being wiped from existence at any moment. This also suggested that the majority of undiscerning humanity are creatures with the same significance as insects and plants, who, in their small, visionless and unimportant nature, do not recognize a much greater struggle between greater forces.

H. P. Lovecraft. Howard Phillips "H.

H. P. Lovecraft

P. " Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author who achieved posthumous fame through his influential works of horror fiction. Virtually unknown and only published in pulp magazines before he died in poverty, he is now regarded as one of the most significant 20th-century authors in his genre. Lovecraft was born in Providence, Rhode Island, where he spent most of his life. His father was confined to a mental institution when Lovecraft was 3 years old. Although he seems to have had some social life, attending meetings of a club for local young men, Lovecraft in early adulthood was established in a reclusive 'nightbird' lifestyle without occupation or pursuit of romantic adventures. Lovecraft returned to Providence in 1926, and over the next nine months he produced some of his most celebrated tales including "The Call of Cthulhu", canonical to the Cthulhu Mythos. Early life[edit] Family[edit] Lovecraft at c. nine years old. The Age of Reason.

Title page from the first English edition of Part I Most of Paine's arguments had long been available to the educated elite, but by presenting them in an engaging and irreverent style, he made deism appealing and accessible to a mass audience.

The Age of Reason

The book was also inexpensive, putting it within the reach of a large number of buyers. Fearing the spread of what they viewed as potentially revolutionary ideas, the British government prosecuted printers and booksellers who tried to publish and distribute it. Nevertheless, Paine's work inspired and guided many freethinkers. Historical context[edit] Intellectual context: eighteenth-century British deism[edit] Paine's book followed in the tradition of early eighteenth-century British deism. While some deists accepted revelation, most argued that revelation's restriction to small groups or even a single person limited its explanatory power. George Cruikshank'sThe Radical's Arms (1819), pillorying the excesses of the French revolution. T. S. Eliot.

Little Gidding (poem) Little Gidding is the fourth and final poem of T.

Little Gidding (poem)

S. Eliot's Four Quartets, a series of poems that discuss time, perspective, humanity, and salvation. It was first published in September 1942 after being delayed for over a year because of the air-raids on Great Britain during World War II and Eliot's declining health. The title refers to a small Anglican community in Huntingdonshire, established by Nicholas Ferrar in the 17th century and scattered during the English Civil War.

Arthur Conan Doyle. Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish physician and writer who is most noted for his fictional stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction.

Arthur Conan Doyle

He is also known for writing the fictional adventures of a second character he invented, Professor Challenger, and for popularising the mystery of the Mary Celeste.[1] He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, and historical novels. Life and career[edit]