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Black Pullet. This design for an amulet comes from the Black Pullet grimoire.

Black Pullet

Embroider it upon blacksatin, and say "Nades, Suradis, Maniner", and a djinn is supposed to appear; tell the djinn "Sader, Prostas, Solaster", and the djinn will bring you your true love. Say "Mammes, Laher" when you tire of her. The Black Pullet (La poule noire) is a grimoire that proposes to teach the "science of magical talismans and rings", including the art of necromancy and Kabbalah.

It is believed to have been written in the 18th century[1] by an anonymous French officer who served in Napoleon's army. The text takes the form of a narrative centering on the French officer during the Egyptian expedition led by Napoleon (referred to here as the "genius") when his unit is suddenly attacked by Arab soldiers (Bedouins). Necronomicon. A fan-created prop representing the Necronomicon (2004) The Necronomicon is a fictional grimoire appearing in the stories by horror writer H.


P. Lovecraft and his followers. It was first mentioned in Lovecraft's 1924 short story "The Hound",[1] written in 1922, though its purported author, the "Mad Arab" Abdul Alhazred, had been quoted a year earlier in Lovecraft's "The Nameless City".[2] Among other things, the work contains an account of the Old Ones, their history, and the means for summoning them. Other authors such as August Derleth and Clark Ashton Smith also cited it in their works; Lovecraft approved, believing such common allusions built up "a background of evil verisimilitude. " Capitalizing on the notoriety of the fictional volume, real-life publishers have printed many books entitled Necronomicon since Lovecraft's death.

Origin Donald R. The Cats of Ulthar. "The Cats of Ulthar" is a short story written by American fantasy author H.

The Cats of Ulthar

P. Lovecraft in June 1920. Cosmicism. Cosmicism is the literary philosophy developed and used by the American writer H.


P. H. P. Lovecraft. Howard Phillips "H.

H. P. Lovecraft

P. " Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author who achieved posthumous fame through his influential works of horror fiction. Virtually unknown and only published in pulp magazines before he died in poverty, he is now regarded as one of the most significant 20th-century authors in his genre. Lovecraft was born in Providence, Rhode Island, where he spent most of his life. His father was confined to a mental institution when Lovecraft was 3 years old. Although he seems to have had some social life, attending meetings of a club for local young men, Lovecraft in early adulthood was established in a reclusive 'nightbird' lifestyle without occupation or pursuit of romantic adventures. The Age of Reason. Title page from the first English edition of Part I Most of Paine's arguments had long been available to the educated elite, but by presenting them in an engaging and irreverent style, he made deism appealing and accessible to a mass audience.

The Age of Reason

The book was also inexpensive, putting it within the reach of a large number of buyers. Fearing the spread of what they viewed as potentially revolutionary ideas, the British government prosecuted printers and booksellers who tried to publish and distribute it. Nevertheless, Paine's work inspired and guided many freethinkers. Historical context[edit] Intellectual context: eighteenth-century British deism[edit] Paine's book followed in the tradition of early eighteenth-century British deism. While some deists accepted revelation, most argued that revelation's restriction to small groups or even a single person limited its explanatory power. T. S. Eliot. Thomas Stearns Eliot OM (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965) was an essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic and "one of the twentieth century's major poets.

T. S. Eliot

"[1] Born in St. Louis, Missouri in the United States, he moved to the United Kingdom in 1914 (at age 25) and was naturalised as a British subject in 1927 at age 39. Life[edit] Early life and education[edit] Eliot was born into the Eliot family, a middle class family originally from New England. Several factors are responsible for Eliot's infatuation with literature during his childhood. Following graduation, Eliot attended Milton Academy in Massachusetts for a preparatory year, where he met Scofield Thayer, who would later publish The Waste Land. After working as a philosophy assistant at Harvard from 1909 to 1910, Eliot moved to Paris, where from 1910 to 1911, he studied philosophy at the Sorbonne. Little Gidding (poem) Little Gidding is the fourth and final poem of T.

Little Gidding (poem)

S. Eliot's Four Quartets, a series of poems that discuss time, perspective, humanity, and salvation. It was first published in September 1942 after being delayed for over a year because of the air-raids on Great Britain during World War II and Eliot's declining health. Arthur Conan Doyle.

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish physician and writer who is most noted for his fictional stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction.

Arthur Conan Doyle

He is also known for writing the fictional adventures of a second character he invented, Professor Challenger, and for popularising the mystery of the Mary Celeste.[1] He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, and historical novels. Life and career[edit] Early life[edit]