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San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership Blog: books/publications. Children need time to adjust to the separation caused by having a parent in prison.

San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership Blog: books/publications

But it takes more than time. As we have heard in their voices, children also need to make sense of what has happened to them and to their parent or parents. Because of this, they have many questions. Some of the questions they ask are straightforward. But sometimes their questions come out indirectly or in their challenging behavior.

Children who are present when a parent is arrested, especially young children, are usually not told where their parents are being taken, when they will be coming home, or why they have to go away. Our childhood experiences shape much of our adult lives. Here are questions that children whose parents are incarcerated often ask, along with suggestions about how to answer them. 1) Where is my Mom or Dad? Sooner or later children will realize the truth and know they have been lied to. 2) When is he or she coming home? 3) Why is she or he in jail or prison? 8) Is this my fault? SFCIPP. Since the Bill of Rights was first published in 2003, it has been widely distributed and used in venues around the country to educate the public, provoke discussion, and train service providers.

SFCIPP

In 2005, SFCIPP launched the Rights to Realities Initiative, with the long-term goal of ensuring that every child in San Francisco whose parent is arrested and/or incarcerated is guaranteed the rights that follow. Our current work plan involves assessing the current status of each right in San Francisco, and the availability of model practices from around the nation; identifying which agencies might contribute to addressing each right; and working with those agencies to develop responsive policies and practices.

Our overarching aim is to ensure that every decision about criminal justice policy and practice takes into account the needs and hopes of children. New York Initiative for Children of Incarcerated Parents. More than 2.7 million children currently have a parent in prison or jail.

New York Initiative for Children of Incarcerated Parents

These children interact with multiple systems in communities, including the justice system, the child welfare system, the health care system, and the education system. This collaboration profile is meant to help community-based organizations, advocacy groups, and state and local government agencies that are interested in improving these systems’ responses to the needs of children of incarcerated parents. This collaboration profile describes an example of a successful initiative that brings together organizations from these multiple systems to improve outcomes for children of incarcerated parents. NASA Science. U.S. Mint. U.S. Dept. of The Treasury. The White House. Opening the Doors to the White House President Obama is committed to making this the most open and participatory administration in history.

The White House

Learn How You Can Participate White House Petitions A new way to petition the Obama Administration to take action on a range of important issues. Visit We the People White House Social Media Explore all the ways you can engage with the White House online and see our most recent updates.Visit the Hub Support for Our Heroes Joining Forces is dedicated to connecting our servicemen and women, veterans and military spouses with the resources they need to find jobs at home. U.S. House of Representatives. Internal Revenue Service.

U.S. Dept. of Labor. FAA Fed. Aviation Administration. U.S. Dept. of State. Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) NHTSA Nat. Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Marshals Home Page. U.S. Attorneys' Office. United States Patent and Trademark Office. Digital Public Library of America. Arpa-e > Home. Using Primary Sources on the Web. This brief guide is designed to help students and researchers find and evaluate primary sources available online.

Using Primary Sources on the Web

Keep in mind as you use this website, the Web is always changing and evolving. If you have questions, please consult your instructor or librarian. Primary sources are the evidence of history, original records or objects created by participants or observers at the time historical events occurred or even well after events, as in memoirs and oral histories. Primary sources may include but are not limited to: letters, manuscripts, diaries, journals, newspapers, maps, speeches, interviews, documents produced by government agencies, photographs, audio or video recordings, born-digital items (e.g. emails), research data, and objects or artifacts (such as works of art or ancient roads, buildings, tools, and weapons).

These sources serve as the raw materials historians use to interpret and analyze the past. Joyce Valenza's Primary Source Pathfinder. US History Primary Sources. Congressional Research Service. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. National Archives Online Public Access. National Archives and Records Administration. National Libraries and Archives. Library of Congress Home. Smithsonian Institution Archives. Organizations and Institutions. Welcome to the CIA Web Site. The National Security Archive. December 9, 2014 Torture Report Finally Released Senate Intelligence Committee Summary of CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program Concludes CIA Misled Itself, Congress, the President about Lack of Effectiveness.

The National Security Archive

September 28, 2014 THE YELLOW BOOK Secret Salvadoran military document from the civil war era catalogued "enemies," many killed or disappeared. More recent items The National Security Archive is an independent non-governmental research institute and library located at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. National Security Archive, Suite 701, Gelman Library, The George Washington University, 2130 H Street, NW, Washington, D.C., 20037, Phone: 202/994-7000, Fax: 202/994-7005, nsarchiv@gwu.edu. National Register of Historic Places Database and Research Page. Office of Management and Budget. U.S. Department of State. US-CERT: United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team. U.S. Dept. of Transportation. The Official Home of the Department of Defense.

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Welcome to the National Security Agency. Official Home of the United States Marine Corps. United States Air Force - airforce.com. Freer and Sackler Galleries. The Official Web Site of the United States Navy.

The Official Home Page of the United States Army. Visual Understanding Environment. US Environmental Protection Agency. GOVERNMENT. Museums and Historic Sites. HistoryBuff.com. Legislative Branch. FSA Farm Service Agency. Amtrak. Food Safety and Inspection Service. Supreme Court of the United States. Opinions from the U.S. Supreme Court. What's New The Chief Justice’s 2013 Year-End Report.

Opinions from the U.S. Supreme Court

A new exhibition, Capturing Justice: Judicial Portraits by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, has been installed on the ground floor. The Court has adopted a revised version of the Rules of the Court to take effect July 1, 2013. Members of the Bar of the Supreme Court of the U. S. should inform the Court immediately of any address, name or other status changes by forwarding a letter that includes counsel’s name and date-of-birth to: USJFCOM - Joint Forces Command. Journal of the U.S. Supreme Court. What's New The Chief Justice’s 2013 Year-End Report.

Journal of the U.S. Supreme Court

A new exhibition, Capturing Justice: Judicial Portraits by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, has been installed on the ground floor. The Court has adopted a revised version of the Rules of the Court to take effect July 1, 2013. Members of the Bar of the Supreme Court of the U. S. should inform the Court immediately of any address, name or other status changes by forwarding a letter that includes counsel’s name and date-of-birth to: NESDIS Nat. Environmental Satellite, Data, & Info. Service. U.S. Postal Service. NOAA Corps. U.S. Postal Inspection Service. Census Bureau. NASA Nat. Aeronautics & Space Admin. U. S. Bureau of Industry and Security.

GSA General Services Administration. Defense Intelligence Agency. Federal Reserve System. Nat. Agricultural Library. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. U.S. Dept. of Commerce. U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. U.S. Secret Service. Health Resources & Services Admin. Photos of US DoI. U.S. Dept. of Energy. U.S. National Park Service - Experience Your America.

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. NNSA Nat. Nuclear Security Admin. Public Health Srv Commissioned Corps. United States Department of Health and Human Services. FBI Nat. Press room. At a hearing before a House Appropriations Subcommittee this morning, FBI Director James B.

FBI Nat. Press room

Comey laid out the Bureau’s budget request for fiscal year 2015 and summarized the various efforts this funding supports. Also this morning, FBI Criminal Investigative Division Acting Assistant Director Michael T. Harpster briefed a House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Bureau’s efforts to combat child sex trafficking. Comey touched on national security matters of concern to the FBI—including counterterrorism, counterintelligence, weapons of mass destruction, intelligence, and cyber—as well as priority criminal issues such as public corruption, financial crimes, gangs and violent crime, transnational organized crime, crimes against children, and Indian country crime. FBI on YouTube. US Code Office of the Law Rev. Counsel. U.S. Dept. of Defense (defense.gov) USGS U.S. Geological Survey.

U.S. Army. U.S. Navy. FBI PressOffice. FBI Domestic Field Offices. U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security. U.S. Dept. of the Interior. DEA Drug Enforcement Administration. BOP Federal Bureau of Prisons. U.S. Dept. of Justice. U.S. Senate.