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Apr 2017

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How Climate Scientists Feel About Climate Change Deniers - Jason Box Tweet Controversy. Now, sitting behind his desk in his office at Penn State, he goes back to his swirl of emotions.

How Climate Scientists Feel About Climate Change Deniers - Jason Box Tweet Controversy

"You find yourself in the center of this political theater, in this chess match that's being played out by very powerful figures—you feel anger, befuddlement, disillusionment, disgust. " The intimidating effect is undeniable, he says. Some of his colleagues were so demoralized by the accusations and investigations that they withdrew from public life. One came close to suicide. 350.org – Peoples Climate Sister Marches from Coast to Coast.

More than 100,000 people joined hundreds of Peoples Climate sister marches that spanned from coast to coast in the United States.

350.org – Peoples Climate Sister Marches from Coast to Coast

Here’s just a taste: Denver, CO Photo Credit: Christian O’Rourke. Congress must take bold action on climate change. With every passing day, the climate crisis continues spinning out of control, and the Trump administration is in full denial mode.

Congress must take bold action on climate change

As Trump filled his cabinet with climate deniers and fossil fuel executives, the Earth experienced yet another hottest year on record and the highest levels of CO2 in 3 million years.1,2 Progressive champions Sens. Jeff Merkley and Bernie Sanders have just introduced the 100 By '50 Act, sweeping climate legislation to wean the United States completely off fossil fuels by 2050. It's long past time for action to reverse the catastrophic havoc climate change has wreaked on the Earth. We must demand Congress act on this legislation before it gets any worse. Tell Congress: Commit America to 100% renewable energy by 2050. Candidats à la présidentielle: Pour une politique climatique responsable. Les impressionnantes images de la rupture d'un énorme iceberg au Groenland. Un énorme iceberg flottant au large du Canada attire les curieux.

We just hit 410 ppm of CO2. Welcome to a whole new world. Ten years ago, Mark Magaña was a D.C. lobbyist, when the Bipartisan Policy Center hired him to rally Latino support for an ill-fated bill to limit corporate carbon emissions.

We just hit 410 ppm of CO2. Welcome to a whole new world.

As Magaña soon found, there was no network to tap. Even within green groups in Washington, most Latino environmentalists didn’t know each other. Une rivière entière a disparu au Canada en à peine quatre jours. 5 Foods With Huge Carbon Footprints. When you bite into a hamburger or enjoy a pile of roast asparagus, do you think about the impact it has on the environment?

5 Foods With Huge Carbon Footprints

Well, maybe you should. See, the food that we eat has an incredible impact on climate change. In fact, agriculture is one of the largest sources of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane. What foods we choose to buy, how we choose to purchase them and how often we consume them matter to global warming. And not all foods have an equal impact. Study: 10 Yrs. to Stop Climate Damage or Else! (as Pruitt Calls for U.S. to ‘Exit’ Paris Accord) - EnviroNews. (EnviroNews USA Headline News Desk) — Humanity has about a decade to reduce carbon emissions and meet the climate goals set by the monumental Paris Agreement (Paris accord) of 2016, according to an International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) study called, Pathways for balancing CO2 emissions and sinks.

Study: 10 Yrs. to Stop Climate Damage or Else! (as Pruitt Calls for U.S. to ‘Exit’ Paris Accord) - EnviroNews

The study’s urgent recommendations are in stark contrast with the mindset of Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt, who on April 13, called for a complete “exit” from the historic Paris Agreement, calling it “a bad deal for America.” The Austrian study, published in the journal Nature Communications in February 2017, analyzes the release and uptake of carbon through both natural and anthropogenic (human-caused) sources. The 1.5°C target he refers to is the secondary goal of the Paris accord, which has a primary goal of keeping the rise in global temperature to below 2°C.

Scientists say that human-caused climate change rerouted a river. For years, oil and gas companies have plumbed the earth beneath Los Angeles.

Scientists say that human-caused climate change rerouted a river.

And in most cases the companies and city — surprise! — allegedly sidestepped environmental laws in the process. Poor communities of color have suffered the most. “The city disproportionately exposed people of color to greater health and safety impacts,” says attorney Gladys Limón of the environmental justice nonprofit Communities for a Better Environment. Ifaw. Artist shows what climate change will do to our national parks. National parks are at the front lines of climate change.

Artist shows what climate change will do to our national parks

The creep of change is playing out in places that Americans have set aside to be preserved for the enjoyment of future generations. A new poster series takes the landscapes that have inspired countless road trips and daydreams of summer vacation and imagines what they’ll look like in 2050 if climate change is allowed to continue unchecked.

Pour protéger la Terre, sauvons les océans. A crucial climate mystery is just under our feet. What Jonathan Sanderman really wanted was some old dirt.

A crucial climate mystery is just under our feet

He called everyone he could think of who might know where he could get some. He emailed colleagues and read through old studies looking for clues, but he kept coming up empty. Sanderman was looking for old dirt because it would let him test a plan to save the world. Soil scientists had been talking about this idea for decades: farmers could turn their fields into giant greenhouse gas sponges, potentially offsetting as much as 15 percent of global fossil fuel emissions a year, simply by coaxing crops to suck more CO2 out of the air. Farmers could lead the way on climate action. Here’s how. President Trump, congressional Republicans, and most American farmers share common positions on climate change: They question the science showing human activity is altering the global climate and are skeptical of using public policy to reduce greenhouse gas pollution.

Farmers could lead the way on climate action. Here’s how.

But farmers are in a unique position to tackle climate change. We have the political power, economic incentive, and policy tools to do so. What we don’t yet have is the political will. As a fifth-generation Iowa farmer and the resilient agriculture coordinator at the Drake University Agricultural Law Center, I deal with both the challenges and opportunities of climate change. Géoingénierie : un test pour refroidir la Terre est à l'étude. Driven by heat and high winds, wildfires are 10 times worse this year than average. Wildfire season, or the period between spring and late fall when dry weather, heat, and ignition sources make wildfires more likely, is already off to a devastating start, with fires already burning through a combined 2 million acres across the country — ten times the average for mid-March. According to data from the National Interagency Fire Center, more acreage has already burned in 2017 than burned during the entire fire season in 1989, 1993, and 1998.

Record-high temperatures combined with low humidity and high wind have created the ideal environment for wildfires throughout much of the Great Plains and into the West, destroying homes and property and resulting in several deaths. Late last week, a blaze near Boulder, Colorado, forced hundreds to evacuate from their homes. The fire, which burned 74 acres, was fully contained as of Monday.