JOURNALISM

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Technology gives journalists unprecedented power to track down information. And technology gives lots of other people the ability to follow journalists’ footprints. Just ask the Associated Press . Now the New Yorker magazine says it can help journalists, and their sources, cover their tracks. It is rolling out an electronic tip box it says will give leakers and tipsters the ability to cloak their identity when they reach out to the magazine. New Yorker Creates Aaron Swartz's Open Source Strongbox Secure Tip Box - Peter Kafka - Media New Yorker Creates Aaron Swartz's Open Source Strongbox Secure Tip Box - Peter Kafka - Media
Who should see what when? Three principles for personalized news I really don’t know how a news editor should choose what stories to put in front of people, because I don’t think it’s possible to cram the entire world into headlines. The publisher of a major international newspaper once told me that he delivers “the five or six things I absolutely have to know this morning.” But there was always a fundamental problem with that idea, which the Internet has made starkly obvious: There is far more that matters than any one of us can follow. In most cases, the limiting factor in journalism is not what was reported but the attention we can pay to it. Yet we still need news. Who should see what when? Three principles for personalized news
Seven_Forces_Media.pdf
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“Journalists have lost control of the story”: Twitter, tech bubbles, and the nostalgia of the technology press » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism “Journalists have lost control of the story”: Twitter, tech bubbles, and the nostalgia of the technology press » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism Editor’s Note: I’m very happy to welcome Tim Carmody — who you may know from Snarkmarket, kottke.org, Wired.com, Twitter, or elsewhere — as a contributor to the Lab. Here he looks at how the increasing speed of media opens us to manipulation — and false nostalgia. There’s nothing new about speculation bubbles, especially in the technology industry. It’s nearly impossible to be certain which new ideas or products will be able to do what they’re supposed to be able to — let alone whether they’ll be able to do so at cost or scale, if they’ll be adopted by the market, or if a competitor will get there first and better. And when everything’s happening quickly and everything seems exciting, it’s nearly impossible to tell a bubble from a real boom.
Journalism Accelerator: A forum about innovation in journalism, beyond the usual suspects