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L'eau en Chine

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Floods give Three Gorges Dam biggest test yet. It was the fourth Yangtze flood of the year and, on July 24, the water level at Chaotianmen in Chongqing, western China, hit 187.92 metres – the highest flood peak since 1981.

Floods give Three Gorges Dam biggest test yet

Up to 71,200 cubic metres of water flowed past every second, 28 times faster than the Yellow River and with volumes greater than those recorded during the huge floods of 1998 and 2010. This was the biggest test for the Three Gorges Dam in its nine-year history. Official reports from Chongqing city indicate its outlying districts of Jiangjin and Yongchuan were badly impacted by the floods.

In total, around 163,000 people were affected, including more than 82,000 evacuated from their homes. Though this was the mammoth dam's most serious test to date, in terms of what the structure is built to withstand it was a moderate challenge at worst; the kind of thing its operators expect to see every 20 years. Drying up the Han River: impacts of China's South-North Water Transfer project.

If you wanted to trace the roots of Chinese civilization, you would do well to take a trip along the banks of the Han River.

Drying up the Han River: impacts of China's South-North Water Transfer project

This 1,577-kilometre waterway flows through the heart of China, linking the Yangtze and Yellow River basins as it passes through the ancient states of Qin, Long, Ba and Shu and the Central Plain – known as the “cradle of Chinese civilisation”. Following the Han, you also follow the progress of the Chinese nation. Amazingly, even in our industrialised era, the upper reaches of the Han still run clear. And it is this rare water quality, combined with the river’s convenient location, that has landed the Han a central role in a mega infrastructure scheme – China’s South-North Water Transfer Project.

And it is this project that may cause the Han River to dry up. Beijing va recycler l'eau pour atteindre ses objectifs de consommation. Beijing, une ville où l'eau est rare, va tenter d'atteindre ses objectifs annuels de consommation d'eau en utilisant en partie des approvisionnements recyclés provenant des usines de traitement des eaux usées à des fins environnementales, comme le nettoyage des routes et l'arrosage des jardins municipaux et des ceintures vertes.

Beijing va recycler l'eau pour atteindre ses objectifs de consommation

L’approvisionnement en eau à Beijing grâce au réservoir Danjiangkou est effectif_CCTV.com française_央视网(cctv.com) Vendredi marque une journée importante concernant le projet de transfert d'eau Sud-Nord de la Chine.

L’approvisionnement en eau à Beijing grâce au réservoir Danjiangkou est effectif_CCTV.com française_央视网(cctv.com)

The Ministry of Water Resources the People's Republic of China. MWR History Ministry of Water Resources (MWR), the Chinese Government Department responsible for water administration, was founded in October, 1949.

The Ministry of Water Resources the People's Republic of China

On February 11, 1958, the 5th Session of the 1st National People’s Congress promulgated decisions to consolidate Ministry of Water Resources and Ministry of Electric Power Industry into Ministry of Water Resources and Electric Power. On February 23, 1979, Ministry of Water Resources and Electric Power was separated into two ministries. Comparaisonchinefrance politiqueeau. Evolution des problèmes de l’eau et réformes de sa gestion en Chine - Forum China‑Europa.

Auteurs : 王毅 Synthèse Evolution des problèmes de l’eau et réformes de sa gestion en Chine.

Evolution des problèmes de l’eau et réformes de sa gestion en Chine - Forum China‑Europa

Drinking the Northwest Wind. Like so many of Mao’s pronouncements, it sounded simple.

Drinking the Northwest Wind

“The South has a lot of water; the North lacks water. So if it can be done, borrowing a little water and bringing it up might do the trick.” And thus, in 1952, the spark was lit for what would blaze to life four decades later as China’s most ambitious engineering project—a scheme to bring some 45 billion cubic meters of water, mostly from the mighty Yangtze and its tributaries, up to the north China plain to Beijing and the parched farmland and factory towns around it. The central route of the project began carrying water from Hubei to Beijing in late 2014, and, like so many of Mao’s plans, it has left a swath of human devastation in its wake. Lovell and Wang’s focus is on the direct human costs of the transfer—who has won, and who has lost. —Susan Jakes. RD 20070125.

Fleuves

Chine : les raisons d'une crise de l'eau qui s'aggrave. La plupart des experts font à peu près la même analyse : la rapide et spectaculaire croissance économique de la Chine s’est largement faite au détriment de la protection de ses ressources naturelles au point qu’aujourd’hui ce pays doit faire face à une crise de l’eau douce de plus en plus grave : gestions déficientes, surexploitations, pénuries, pollutions.

Chine : les raisons d'une crise de l'eau qui s'aggrave

Le développement de l’industrialisation et de l’urbanisation en Chine a provoqué une augmentation considérable de la demande d’eau et certaines projections font penser que cette demande augmentera encore de 20 % supplémentaires dans les deux décennies à venir. Même si l’agriculture reste le principal consommateur d’eau (les deux tiers environ), sa part est en constante baisse du fait des besoins des autres secteurs : en un quart de siècle, la part de l’industrie dans l’utilisation de l’eau a doublé pour dépasser les 20 % et la part des municipalités a triplé.

Les grandes villes doivent de plus en plus faire face à la pénurie.