Character archetypes

Facebook Twitter

Caradoc. Caradoc Vreichvras (/kəˈrædək/[1] or /ˈkærədɒk/;[2] in modern Welsh spelling, Caradog Freichfras, meaning Caradoc Strong (or Stout) Arm) was a semi-legendary ancestor to the kings of Gwent.

Caradoc

He lived during the 5th or 6th century. He is remembered in Arthurian legend as a Knight of the Round Table as Carados Briefbras (French 'Caradog Short Arm'). Identification and historicity[edit] Viridios. Viridios, or Viridius is the supposed deified masculine spirit of verdure, in ancient Roman Britain.

Viridios

Centres of worship[edit] Viridios was worshipped in Roman Britain and altar-stones raised to him have been recovered in the United Kingdom, at Ancaster. Ancaster is so far the only place where inscriptions to this god have been found. The Latin name "Visidius" is known from Cicero as the name of a brave and loyal Roman soldier ("Vis" means strength and force").

As the Ancaster inscriptions are in Latin it is therefore not unlikely that the name (as there is a similar Latin name documented) is also in Latin. Category:Cephalophores. Ysbaddaden. Ysbaddaden props up his eyelids (Illustration by John D. Batten, 1892) Culhwch at Ysbadadden's court. Sabazios. Bronze hand used in the worship of Sabazios (British Museum).

Sabazios

Roman 1st-2nd century CE. Hands decorated with religious symbols were designed to stand in sanctuaries or, like this one, were attached to poles for processional use. Sabazios (Ancient Greek: Σαβάζιος) is the nomadic horseman and sky father god of the Phrygians and Thracians. Giants (Welsh folklore) In the Mabinogi of Branwen ferch Llyr, Britain is ruled by the giant Bran the Blessed, who has never been able to fit inside any dwelling.

Giants (Welsh folklore)

In Culhwch and Olwen, giants feature as antagonists throughout. Ysbaddaden, chief of giants, is the father of Olwen, a beautiful maiden sought by Culhwch fab Cilydd, a cousin of King Arthur's. Year and a day rule. The year and a day rule has been a common traditional length of time for establishing differences in legal status.

Year and a day rule

The phrase "year and a day rule" is associated with the former common law standard that death could not be legally attributed to acts or omissions that occurred more than a year and a day before the death. It is elsewhere associated with the minimum sentence for a crime to count as a felony. Green Man. Types of Green Men[edit] Lady Raglan coined the term "Green Man" in her 1939 article "The Green Man in Church Architecture" in The Folklore Journal.[3] Some commentators conflate or associate the term with "Jack in the Green".[4] Usually referred to in works on architecture as foliate heads or foliate masks, carvings of the Green Man may take many forms, naturalistic or decorative.

Green Man

The simplest depict a man's face peering out of dense foliage. Dying god. The methods of death can be diverse, the Norse Baldr mistakenly dies by the arrow of his blind brother, the Aztec Quetzalcoatl sets himself on fire after over-drinking, and the Japanese Izanami dies of a fever.[2][15] Some gods who die are also seen as either returning or bringing about life in some other form, in many cases associated with a vegetation deity related to a staple.[2][16] The very existence of the category "dying-and-rising-god" was debated throughout the 20th century, and the soundness of the category was widely questioned, given that many of the proposed gods did not return in a permanent sense as the same deity.[1][2][17] By the end of the 20th century, scholarly consensus had formed against the reasoning used to suggest the category, and it was generally considered inappropriate from a historical perspective.[2][18] Overview[edit] Odin whispering to a dead Baldr as he is to be sent out to sea.

Dying god

Saint George. Saint George (Greek: Γεώργιος (Georgios), Classical Syriac: ܓܝܘܪܓܝܣ (Giwargis), Latin: Georgius; c. 275/281 – 23 April 303 AD), born in Lydda, Roman Palestine, was a soldier in the Roman army and was later venerated as a Christian martyr.

Saint George

His father was Gerontius, a Greek Christian from Cappadocia, and an official in the Roman army. His mother, Polychronia was a local Greek Christian of Palestine.[3] Saint George became an officer in the Roman army in the Guard of Diocletian. Mother goddess. Mother goddess is a term used to refer to a goddess who represents and/or is a personification of nature, motherhood, fertility, creation, destruction or who embodies the bounty of the Earth.

Mother goddess

When equated with the Earth or the natural world, such goddesses are sometimes referred to as Mother Earth or as the Earth Mother. Many different goddesses have represented motherhood in one way or another, and some have been associated with the birth of humanity as a whole, along with the universe and everything in it. Others have represented the fertility of the earth. Paleolithic figures[edit] The Venus of Dolní Věstonice, one of the earliest known depictions of the human body, dates to approximately 29,000–25,000 BC (Gravettian culture of the Upper Paleolithic era)