FVR en AFRIQUE

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OIE - NOV 2012 - Economic impact of RVF outbreaks on trade within and between East Africa and Middle East OIE - NOV 2012 - Economic impact of RVF outbreaks on trade within and between East Africa and Middle East Upon downloading a document (article, communication, etc.) from ORBi, the University of Liège's Institutional Repository website, the User (i.e. an individual or a corporate body) agrees to respect the terms of the present licence in his/her use of said document. The University, duly authorized by the authors or their legal representatives, herewith authorizes the User, in accordance with the principles of the "Budapest Open Access Initiative"(BOAI, 2002), to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself. The present licence does not authorize the use of the document for commercial purposes. The present licence is applicable worldwide and for the legal duration of the copyright protection.
Kenyatta University (Kenya) - 2009 - Thèse en ligne : Molecular Characterization of Rift Valley Fever Virus during the East Afri Molecular Characterization of Rift Valley Fever Virus during the East African Outbreak, 2006 – 2007 Abstract Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a disease caused by Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV). Kenyatta University (Kenya) - 2009 - Thèse en ligne : Molecular Characterization of Rift Valley Fever Virus during the East Afri
VETERINARIA ITALIANA - 2007 - A Rift Valley fever risk surveillance system for Africa using remotely sended data: potential for
FVR dans différents pays Africains

CDC EID – DEC 2011 - Rift Valley and West Nile Virus Antibodies in Camels, North Africa CDC EID – DEC 2011 - Rift Valley and West Nile Virus Antibodies in Camels, North Africa Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options CDC Home CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People
FAO 06/06/11 Réunion Transfrontalière des Services Vétérinaires et des Laboratoires Nationaux pour le Renforcement de la Surveil
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010 August 5; 83(2_Suppl): 38–42. Pathologic Studies on Suspect Animal and Human Cases of Rift Valley Fever Introduction Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic, arthropod-borne viral disease that affects domestic animals and humans. The disease is caused by the RVF virus (RVFV), a member of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010 August 5; 83(2_Suppl): 38–42. Pathologic Studies on Suspect Animal and Human Cases of Rift Valley Fever
A Peer-Reviewed Open-Access Journal
Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a neglected, emerging, mosquito-borne disease with severe negative impact on human and animal health and economy. RVF is caused by RVF virus (RVFV) affecting humans and a wide range of animals. The virus is transmitted through bites from mosquitoes and exposure to viremic blood, body fluids, or tissues of infected animals. PLOS 27/09/11 The 2007 Rift Valley Fever Outbreak in Sudan PLOS 27/09/11 The 2007 Rift Valley Fever Outbreak in Sudan
FAO 06/06/11 Réunion Transfrontalière des Services Vétérinaires et des Laboratoires Nationaux pour le Renforcement de la Surveil
Pathologic Studies on Suspect Animal and Human Cases of Rift Valley Fever from an Outbreak in Eastern Africa, 2006–2007
Decision_SupportTool.pdf (Objet application/pdf)
TD05-1.pdf (Objet application/pdf)
Nouveaux vecteurs de la fièvre de la vallée du Rift en Afrique de l'Ouest Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options CDC Home CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People.

Nouveaux vecteurs de la fièvre de la vallée du Rift en Afrique de l'Ouest

Future Medicine - Future Virology - 3(5):411 - Full Text Future Medicine - Future Virology - 3(5):411 - Full Text September 2008, Vol. 3, No. 5, Pages 411-417 , DOI 10.2217/17460794.3.5.411 † Author for correspondence Teams composed of local and international public health and veterinary officials and scientists were dispatched to various locations in Kenya and Tanzania to investigate the outbreak, identify risk factors, define principle mosquito vectors, provide clinical care and infection control, study the clinical syndrome and its sequelae, establish surveillance in livestock and wildlife, and assess economic impact.