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Biometrics

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UK 13-year-old defies 'big brother' and refuses to be fingerprinted. © KristieMelody, 13, protesting the United Kingdom's policy of obtaining biometric data from minors at school.

UK 13-year-old defies 'big brother' and refuses to be fingerprinted

Cardiff - Since 2012, over 800,000 children have had their biometric data taken by the government in the United Kingdom via the school system. Pics in the Blink of an Eye: Iris-Reading Biometric Camera. Recent Royal College of Art graduate Mimi Zou is rethinking the way we take pictures.

Pics in the Blink of an Eye: Iris-Reading Biometric Camera

Her Iris Camera concept would use biometric sensing to read a user’s unique iris signature and load his or her preferred camera settings. Once the camera recognizes the user, it identifies precisely what the user is looking at based on the position of the eye. Zooming in and out are as easy as squinting or widening the eye. When you are ready to take a picture, you hold your gaze steady and then blink twice. The camera takes a picture of exactly what you see, exactly as you see it. Review: DigitalPersona U.are.U Personal fingerprint scanner. Biometric authentication seems to be, on the face of it, a groovy idea.

Review: DigitalPersona U.are.U Personal fingerprint scanner.

Do away with hard-to-remember passwords and easy-to-lose keys and cards; authenticate your identity with your voice, or your face, or your fingerprint. FBI Seeks Video Recognition Technology to Automatically ID Suspects. How a New Police Tool for Face Recognition Works - Digits. Next Generation Identification. Vision Driven by advances in technology, customer requirements, and growing demand for Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) services, the FBI has initiated the Next Generation Identification (NGI) program.

Next Generation Identification

This program will further advance the FBI’s biometric identification services, providing an incremental replacement of current IAFIS technical capabilities, while introducing new functionality. You Won't Need a PIN When You Pay for Everything with Your Face. Biometrics − facing the future. Back to Air Transport IT Review - Issue 1, May 2010 With biometric technology fast maturing and becoming increasingly sophisticated, biometric solutions such as SITA's iBorders BioThenticate, are at last starting to make serious inroads as a high-tech identity management and verification tool within the airport environment.

Biometrics − facing the future

Initial deployments have tended to focus on controlling access to restricted areas for staff, aircrew and suppliers. Currently 29% of airports globally use biometrics for this purpose against only 4% that use it in the check-in or boarding process, according to the Airport IT Trends Survey 2009, by SITA and Airline Business. Yemmi Agbebi, Director of Portfolio Marketing, SITA says: "Biometric technology overcomes the limitations of conventional access control systems − based on pin codes, passwords or photo IDs − since unlike most traditional methods of identification, biometrics cannot be lost, forgotten, stolen or easily forged. " Economic advantages. Eye movements could be our new passwords. The amount of different future password methods seems to be growing at an exponential rate, but this is easily one of my favorites.

Eye movements could be our new passwords

I think mostly because it requires me to do nothing but look. This method traces your eye movements and uses them as a password. Eye movement biometrics « CRISISBOOM. Phys.org A biometric security system based on how a user moves their eyes is being developed by technologists in Finland.

Eye movement biometrics « CRISISBOOM

Writing in the International Journal of Biometrics, the team explains how a person’s saccades, their tiny, but rapid, involuntary eye movements, can be measured using a video camera. The pattern of saccades is as unique as an iris or fingerprint scan but easier to record and so could provide an alternative secure biometric identification technology. Martti Juhola of the University of Tampere and colleagues point out that fingerprint and face recognition are perhaps the most usual biometric means to verify identity for secure access to buildings and computer resources and even at international borders. Public Schools Installing Biometric Hand Scanning Lunch Systems. By JG Vibes theintelhub.com October 3, 2012 Carroll County is the first district in Maryland, and one of the first in the country to install a PalmSecure system in their schools, which will force students of all ages to place their hands through an infrared scanner to pay for their lunches.

Public Schools Installing Biometric Hand Scanning Lunch Systems

The PalmSecure system is currently operating in three Carroll County elementary schools, but should be in every school within a year and a half. Lookie here! College scans students’ eyeballs. Text smaller Text bigger A public university in in Rock Hill, S.C., has announced it is implementing a new eye scanner system that collects and records data about the features of students’ eyes before granting access to school buildings this fall.

Lookie here! College scans students’ eyeballs

Winthrop University’s Associate Vice President for Information Technology James Hammond told Campus Reform the college plans to use the devices to stop “bad guys” from accessing buildings at the 445-acre campus. The scanners, or “EagleEye stations,” cost an estimated $2,000 each. FBI launches $1 billion face recognition project - tech - 07 September 2012.

Facebook Facial Recognition: Its Quiet Rise and Dangerous Future. In early April, Engadget posted a short article confirming a rumor that Facebook would be using facial recognition to suggest the names of friends who appeared in newly uploaded photos.

Facebook Facial Recognition: Its Quiet Rise and Dangerous Future

You’d be allowed to opt out of tagging, and only friends would be able to tag each other in albums. Nevertheless, a commenter beneath the story quipped, “Awesome! Now I can take pictures of cute girls at the grocery store or at the park, upload them and Facebook will tell me who they are! Google patent filing would identify faces in videos, spot the You in YouTube. More privacy fears as Facebook buys facial-recognition startup for undisclosed sum. By Daily Mail Reporter Published: 21:58 GMT, 18 June 2012 | Updated: 07:55 GMT, 19 June 2012. Biometric Database of All Adult Americans Hidden in Immigration Reform. The immigration reform measure the Senate began debating yesterday would create a national biometric database of virtually every adult in the U.S., in what privacy groups fear could be the first step to a ubiquitous national identification system. Buried in the more than 800 pages of the bipartisan legislation (.pdf) is language mandating the creation of the innocuously-named “photo tool,” a massive federal database administered by the Department of Homeland Security and containing names, ages, Social Security numbers and photographs of everyone in the country with a driver’s license or other state-issued photo ID.

Employers would be obliged to look up every new hire in the database to verify that they match their photo. This piece of the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act is aimed at curbing employment of undocumented immigrants. Biometric Database of All Adult Americans Hidden in Immigration Reform. Illustration: National Institutes of Health The immigration reform measure the Senate began debating yesterday would create a national biometric database of virtually every adult in the U.S., in what privacy groups fear could be the first step to a ubiquitous national identification system.

International Journal of Biometrics (IJBM. This site uses some unobtrusive cookies to store information on your computer. Biometric Database Of All Adult Americans Hidden In Immigration Reform. ( David Kravets ) The immigration reform measure the Senate began debating yesterday would create a national biometric database of virtually every adult in the U.S., in what privacy groups fear could be the first step to a ubiquitous national identification system.