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EU AI REGULATION

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EPRS IDA(2021)698021 EN. ARTIFICIAL INTELLigence and Democratic values - Center for AI and Digital Policy. ARTIFICIAL INTELLigence and Democratic values The Event Speech by President von der Leyen at the World Leader for Peace and Security Award (Brussels, Dec. 12, 2020)

ARTIFICIAL INTELLigence and Democratic values - Center for AI and Digital Policy

A European approach to artificial intelligence. The European approach to artificial intelligence (AI) will help build a resilient Europe for the Digital Decade where people and businesses can enjoy the benefits of AI.

A European approach to artificial intelligence

It focuses on 2 areas: excellence in AI and trustworthy AI. The European approach to AI will ensure that any AI improvements are based on rules that safeguard the functioning of markets and the public sector, and people’s safety and fundamental rights. To help further define its vision for AI, the European Commission developed an AI strategy to go hand in hand with the European approach to AI. The AI strategy proposed measures to streamline research, as well as policy options for AI regulation, which fed into work on the AI package. The Commission published its AI package in April 2021, proposing new rules and actions to turn Europe into the global hub for trustworthy AI.

Draft AI Act: ALLAI analysis and recommendations – ALLAI. Catelijne Muller and Virginia Dignum did a thorough analysis of the draft AIA and decided to make a number of practical recommendations for improvement.

Draft AI Act: ALLAI analysis and recommendations – ALLAI

In order to give policy makers something to work with, their analysis does not resort to more general insights or a repetition of high level principles, but provides actual textual proposals to improve and clarify a number of provisions of the AIA Objective, scope and definition Prohibited AI-practices ALLAI welcomes the fact that the European Commission took up the courage to actually prohibit certain AI practicesThe two first prohibitions centre around ‘distorting a person’s behaviour’, but in their current form only capture rare cases.

They however provide a grand opportunity to address one of the most worrying and widespread capabilities of AI: harmful conditioning and manipulation.It is important that the AIA halts the current trajectory of public and private actors using ever more information to assess, categorise and score us. European Commission. The EU Draft AI Regulation: what you need to know now. Minesh Tanna summarises the main points of the Draft EU AI Regulation set to make its way through the EU law making process over the next few years The EU has now published its draft Regulation on AI (“Draft Regulation”), which was promised by President von der Leyen shortly after her appointment in 2019.

The EU Draft AI Regulation: what you need to know now

The Draft Regulation is the first of its kind: it is a comprehensive (and bold) legal framework for the regulation of AI systems; it is directly applicable in Member States (it is not, for example, a “directive”, which relies on domestic implementing legislation); and it aims to put at its core the protection of EU citizens from the harm that could be caused by AI systems. The Draft Regulation adopts a “risk-based approach”: all AI systems are affected to some extent and some AI uses are prohibited; but the main focus is on “high-risk AI systems”, which are subject to various onerous obligations. ’s response to the European Commission’s proposed regulation on Artificial Intelligence – A major step with major gaps - AlgorithmWatch. Disclaimer: Our analysis below is a first take and a provisional analysis of selected issues that we find particularly relevant to our work.

’s response to the European Commission’s proposed regulation on Artificial Intelligence – A major step with major gaps - AlgorithmWatch

A profound and comprehensive assessment of the 100+-page document certainly requires more time and in-depth analysis. Yesterday, the European Commission unveiled its eagerly awaited proposal for the regulation of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Europe. It represents the Commission’s attempt to protect fundamental rights while encouraging innovation in the field of AI and make Europe’s economy “fit for the future”.

Likely, the new regulation will profoundly shape AI regulation in the next decades, not only in Europe but across the globe – through its direct extraterritorial effects as well as through its standard-setting potential. The proposal builds upon the White Paper on Artificial Intelligence, which was published by the European Commission in February 2020 and which was followed by a public consultation phase until June 2020. Youtube. The EU unveils its AI Regulation proposal: Key takeaways of this human-centric draft legislation. Artificial Intelligence or "AI" can be used for the better and for the worse (e.g. understanding cancers to reduce mortality rates, creating deep fake pornographic videos to harass someone…).

The EU unveils its AI Regulation proposal: Key takeaways of this human-centric draft legislation

The European Commission has now come up with an ambitious proposal for a comprehensive legal framework regarding the use of AI. It aims to be human-centric and is focused on the concrete utilisation of the technology (and the risks potentially deriving from it).