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Digital Literacies

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Digital storytelling: How to tell a story that stands out in the digital age? Yesterday I gave two ‘interactive sessions’ in probably the most beautiful room I ever worked in.

Digital storytelling: How to tell a story that stands out in the digital age?

Wall-high Sol LeWitt murals and wide windows with a view over central Leuven formed the backdrop for a lively discussion on digital storytelling in cultural and heritage institutions on occasion of the Mediation in Transition conference in M-Leuven. To address the most important issue first: there is no such thing as digital storytelling. There’s only storytelling in the digital age, and frankly speaking this isn’t much different from storytelling in the age of hunters, gatherers, dinosaurs and ICQ. This doesn’t mean it cannot be challenging to tell a story people react upon online. On any given moment, hundreds of stories are unfolding around you, on Facebook, Twitter, and in niche social spaces.

So, how do you tell a story in the digital age that stands out, captures people’s attention and gets them to act, engage with your institution? The story is really unique and unexpected. InShare36. Image license Attribution. Developing Academic’s Information Literacy. Developing Digital Literacies Programme. Developing Digital Literacies The programme is focused on promoting the development of coherent, inclusive and holistic institutional strategies and organisational approaches for developing digital literacies for all staff and students in UK further and higher education.

Developing Digital Literacies Programme

Funded Projects The bids of the funded projects are available from this web page. The projects start in August 2011 and will run over a period of 2 years until July 2013. The programme will be supported by a central support project which will be managed by JISC Advance with contributions from JISC CETIS. Emerging findings Summary of project baseline reports (April 2012) is available here.6 Summary of the professional association baseline reports (April 2012) is available here7. Further information Please contact Paul Bailey11 for further information about the projects in this programme. Summary of projects Programme activities Start up meeting for the programme24 - 4 October 2011 Programme Meeting25 - Tuesday 15th May 2012. Digital Literacy – delivering the agenda within colleges and universities at JISC On Air. Episode 6: Delivering Digital Literacy- delivering the agenda within colleges and universities (Duration: 21:34) Listen now Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via iTunes Download MP3 Read the show transcript.

Digital Literacy – delivering the agenda within colleges and universities at JISC On Air

Developing digital literacies. 'By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society.

Developing digital literacies

For example, the use of digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; digital professionalism; the use of specialist digital tools and data sets; communicating ideas effectively in a range of media; producing, sharing and critically evaluating information; collaborating in virtual networks; using digital technologies to support reflection and PDP; managing digital reputation and showcasing achievements.' Developing Digital Literacies was a two-year Jisc-funded programme (2011-2013) to promote the development of coherent, inclusive approaches to digital capability across institutions of further and higher education.

This 'home' page provides access to the activities and outcomes of the programme. Themes - key themes which emerged from the programme. Developing digital literacies. Overview Many learners enter further and higher education lacking the skills needed to apply digital technologies to education. As 90% of new jobs will require excellent digital skills, improving digital literacy is an essential component of developing employable graduates.

Courses that embed core digital skills, as well as subject specific use of technology, enable students to gain the skills and confidence they need to use digital technology not only to support their learning but also in the workplace. We’re working with colleges and universities to embed core digital skills into the curriculum. By digital literacy we mean those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society: for example, the skills to use digital tools to undertake academic research, writing and critical thinking; as part of personal development planning; and as a way of showcasing achievements.

Www.tlrp.org/docs/DigitalLiteracies.pdf. Common Sense Media. Common Sense Media is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.

Common Sense Media

We exist because our nation's children spend more time with media and digital activities than they do with their families or in school, which profoundly impacts their social, emotional, and physical development . As a non-partisan, not-for-profit organization, we provide trustworthy information and tools, as well as an independent forum, so that families can have a choice and a voice about the media they consume. We believe in media sanity, not censorship.We believe that media has truly become "the other parent" in our kids' lives, powerfully affecting their mental, physical, and social development.We believe in teaching our kids to be savvy, respectful and responsible media interpreters, creators, and communicators.