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Oregon judge under investigation after refusing to perform same-sex marriages. Marion County judge Vance Day is being investigated by a judicial fitness commission in part over his refusal to perform same-sex marriages on religious grounds, a spokesman for the judge said.

Oregon judge under investigation after refusing to perform same-sex marriages

When a federal court ruling in May 2014 made same-sex marriage legal in Oregon, Day instructed his staff to refer same-sex couples looking to marry to other judges, spokesman Patrick Korten said Friday. Last fall, he decided to stop performing weddings altogether, aside from one in March that had long been scheduled, Korten said. “He made a decision nearly a year ago to stop doing weddings altogether, and the principal factor that he weighed was the pressure that one would face to perform a same-sex wedding, which he had a conflict with his religious beliefs,” Korten said. In an email, Day declined to comment and referred questions to Korten. Supreme court's gay marriage ruling: a day of elation, but decades of activism. The supreme court has made gay marriage the law of the land across the United States, capping decades of legal steps that have sped up rapidly in the past two years.

Supreme court's gay marriage ruling: a day of elation, but decades of activism

The ruling follows decades of activism across the country. Here’s a timeline of what brought the US to this point. December 1924: The first gay rights group is started in the US. Henry Gerber, who immigrated from Germany in 1913, founded the Society for Human Rights in Chicago after being temporarily committed to a mental institution because of his sexuality. Facing criticism by the families of its few members, as well as concerns about employment and arrest, the group disbanded in 1925. 1950: Gay rights organization the Mattachine Society is founded. 28 June 1969: Stonewall riots. Meet the Alabama judges who refuse to issue marriage licenses – gay or straight. Standing in front of their rural Alabama church, just outside a tiny town called Woodland (population 192), two white women in their 50s are making small talk while they wait for their husbands after evening service.

Meet the Alabama judges who refuse to issue marriage licenses – gay or straight

Impossibly polite and welcoming, and speaking in an enchanting southern drawl, they confide they are worried. New year brings new challenges for both sides of religious freedom divide. While the highest justices in the US prepared to legalize gay marriage last year, a new campaign arose among social conservatives.

New year brings new challenges for both sides of religious freedom divide

Its aim was to counter the supreme court’s ruling with state laws creating religious exemptions. Many saw such laws as licenses to discriminate. Conservative lawmakers argued the bills were necessary to protect religious beliefs. But because the majority of states still lack anti-discrimination protections for sexual orientation and gender identity, rights groups accused such lawmakers of designing loopholes in civil rights. Now, as lawmakers head back to state capitols for a new year, states from Georgia to Colorado are readying for more battles over religious freedom, as officials file bills or start to lobby for them.

In Georgia, state legislators have filed a “religious freedom restoration” bill. Same-sex marriage battles continue across United States. For the first time, a Kentucky county clerk is appealing an order to issue same-sex marriage licenses despite the Supreme Court ruling requiring her to do so.

Same-sex marriage battles continue across United States

On Monday, Federal District Judge David Bunning ordered a temporary stay on the issuing of marriage licenses by the Rowan County Clerk's Office while the appeal is pending, according to court documents. David Moore and David Ermold are one of at least four couples who were refused a marriage license by the Rowan County Clerk in Morehead, Kentucky. Supreme Court rules states must allow same-sex marriage.

In the 5-4 ruling, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote for the majority with the four liberal justices.

Supreme Court rules states must allow same-sex marriage

Each of the four conservative justices wrote their own dissent. Nearly 46 years to the day after a riot at New York's Stonewall Inn ushered in the modern gay rights movement, the decision could settle one of the major civil rights fights of this era. The language of Kennedy's opinion spoke eloquently of the most fundamental values of family, love and liberty. "No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice and family," Kennedy wrote. "In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than they once were. " 'Equal dignity in the eyes of the law' "Their hope," Kennedy wrote, "is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization's oldest institutions. Reaction: People soak up history from coast to coast. How legal tide turned on same-sex marriage in the US.

Same sex marriage is now legal in the entire US after a Supreme Court ruling striking down state marriage bans.

How legal tide turned on same-sex marriage in the US

Huffingtonpost. Democrat backs anti-gay marriage amendment. Rep.

Democrat backs anti-gay marriage amendment

Dan Lipinski (D-Ill.) supports a Federal Marriage Amendment against same-sex marriage. (Photo public domain) Support for a U.S. constitutional amendment against same-sex marriage is often associated with former President George W. Bush’s 2004 State of the Union address or the policy platform of Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz. As it turns out, it’s also associated with a Democratic U.S. Rep.