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Inspiring Spaces. Deserving Faces by Amy Fadeji. What does your classroom say about the learning that takes place within the four walls of your room?

Inspiring Spaces. Deserving Faces by Amy Fadeji

Music Education Can Help Children Improve Reading Skills. Children exposed to a multi-year programme of music tuition involving training in increasingly complex rhythmic, tonal, and practical skills display superior cognitive performance in reading skills compared with their non-musically trained peers, according to a study published in the journal Psychology of Music.

Music Education Can Help Children Improve Reading Skills

According to authors Joseph M Piro and Camilo Ortiz from Long Island University, USA, data from this study will help to clarify the role of music study on cognition and shed light on the question of the potential of music to enhance school performance in language and literacy. Several studies have reported positive associations between music education and increased abilities in non-musical (eg, linguistic, mathematical, and spatial) domains in children.

All Research. Rhythm and Music Help Math Students. Stuck on a tricky math problem?

Rhythm and Music Help Math Students

Start clapping. Grade school kids who learned about fractions through a rhythm-and-music-based curriculum outperformed their peers in traditional math classes. The work is in Educational Studies in Mathematics. The Correlation Between Music and Math: A Neurobiology Perspective. Biology 2022002 First Paper On Serendip Cindy Zhan I remember the first time I heard the statement "Did you know that listening to classical music enhances your mathematical abilities?

The Correlation Between Music and Math: A Neurobiology Perspective

" Duncan calls for NCLB repeal. In his speech, Duncan called for Congress to improve access to high-quality preschool in the law.

Duncan calls for NCLB repeal

He also announced that President Obama will include an extra $2.7 billion in his budget proposal for schools, including $1 billion for schools that serve the most vulnerable children. Duncan also proposed new steps to reduce the burden of testing and test preparation on classroom time and to limit unnecessary testing in schools – without sacrificing annual statewide assessments that give educators and parents the information they need to help every child be successfu­­l. Duncan also pushed for more support for states and districts that pursue bold innovations and act on evidence about what works. Duncan called for Congress to ensure that funds are distributed among schools so that all students–regardless of zip code–have access to excellent teaching and resources like technology, instructional materials and safe facilities. Material from a press release was used in this report.

Brush Up On Your EdTech Vocabulary With This Cheat Sheet. Do you know what a flipped classroom requires?

Brush Up On Your EdTech Vocabulary With This Cheat Sheet

How about a 1:1 classroom? If you’re a regular reader of Edudemic, then you probably are more than informed about what these terms mean and how they’re implemented in modern classrooms. That’s probably because we started Edudemic many moons ago on the same day Apple launched the iPad. Since then, a lot has changed in the world of education technology. For one, the edtech vocabulary has expanded quite a bit. The guide is designed to help you understand “the latest trends in educational technology” but really – let’s be honest – it’s a great way to finally figure out what a lot of terms mean before your next staff meeting.

Study: Middle School Teachers as Savvy as Students with Tech. Researchers found that science teachers inside and outside the classroom aren't lagging behind the "digital natives" they teach when it comes to using technology.

Study: Middle School Teachers as Savvy as Students with Tech

The study comes from the work of five researchers, hailing from the New York Institute of Technology, University of Connecticut and Utah State University. The result of their research, posted on the academic research website Springer in October, should bolster the confidence of teachers who feel intimidated about using technology in the classroom. The team surveyed 1,079 middle school students, 774 from Utah and 305 New York, as well as 24 middle school science teachers from those states, ages 23–56, to discover how they compare in terms of tech experience. “Our results indicated that today’s school-age learners are no more technology savvy than their teachers. The previous assumption used to profile students as digital natives … did not apply to the students in this study,” the research team wrote.

Teacher to parents: About THAT kid (the one who hits, disrupts and influences YOUR kid) Amy Murray is the director of early childhood education at the Calgary French & International School in Canada.

Teacher to parents: About THAT kid (the one who hits, disrupts and influences YOUR kid)

The following post, which appeared on her blog, Miss Night’s Marbles and which I am republishing with her permission, is a powerful open letter directed to parents about THAT kid, the one other kids go home and talk about, the one who is violent, curses and gets angry in class, the one who parents worry will hurt, disrupt and perhaps influence their own children. Murray is also the co-founder of #Kinderchat (www.kinderchat.net), a twitter-based global community for educators of young children. She is a speaker and trainer on learning through play, self-regulation, behavior management, and the use of technology within the classroom. What it really means to be a public school educator today. You think you know what teachers do. Right? Wrong. - The Washington Post. (By Charles Rex Arbogast/ AP) You went to school so you think you know what teachers do, right?

You think you know what teachers do. Right? Wrong. - The Washington Post

You are wrong.