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Metacognition in Learning

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7 Research-Based Methods To Improve Student Achievement □□□ (by @john_hattie) #edchat #education #satchat #elearning. Sandrine Thuret: You can grow new brain cells. Here's how. 'Most Likely To Succeed': Schools Should Teach Kids To Think, Not Memorize. Students Tell All: What It’s Like to Be Trusted Partners in Learning.

Inquiry-based learning is not a new pedagogy, but it has come back into fashion in progressive education circles recently because of new emphasis on the power of students’ innate curiosity to drive learning.

Students Tell All: What It’s Like to Be Trusted Partners in Learning

Inquiry-based learning asks students to discover knowledge on their own with guidance from their teachers. Rather than receiving information up front through lectures, students research guiding questions, ask their own follow-ups and get help along the way. Learning through inquiry requires more student agency and demands that teachers and administrators trust that students will ask when they need help. It also places the responsibility for completing tasks and meeting deadlines on the shoulders of students. Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Philadelphia is a partnership between The School District of Philadelphia and The Franklin Institute.

Richard St. John's 8 secrets of success. BRAIN POWER: From Neurons to Networks. Teaching Questioning Skills to Arm Students for Learning - Work in Progress.

In the earliest part of my career, I wrote full procedural lesson plans that spelled out to the letter the questions I would ask AND the answers I considered correct.

Teaching Questioning Skills to Arm Students for Learning - Work in Progress

When the students didn't provide the proscribed answer, I asked helper questions until I elicited the appropriate response. Man, did I have it wrong! This is the battle we fight. It demands our full attention. And if we are going to go to battle, we should appropriately arm our learners. Children are born curious; they have a hunger to learn and a thirst for understanding. Current educational institutions systematically rob curiosity from children, training them to seek one answer, the "right" one. Unfortunately, while on their predictable adventure to the right of truth, kids often lose interest in the passions that once propelled them. One way we change the level of engagement in our classroom is stop doing all of the asking. 5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students. My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom.

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. Um, I don't think she thought it was so cute. I think she was treading lightly on the ever-so shaky ego of a brand-new teacher while still giving me some very necessary feedback. So that day, I learned about wait/think time. Many would agree that for inquiry to be alive and well in a classroom that, amongst other things, the teacher needs to be expert at asking strategic questions, and not only asking well-designed ones, but ones that will also lead students to questions of their own. Keeping It Simple I also learned over the years that asking straightforward, simply-worded questions can be just as effective as those intricate ones.

Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn. Teaching Strategies Bruce Guenter What’s the key to effective learning?

Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn

One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know. To put it in more straightforward terms, anytime a student learns, he or she has to bring in two kinds of prior knowledge: knowledge about the subject at hand (say, mathematics or history) and knowledge about how learning works. Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking. Suggestions from educators at KIPP King Collegiate High School on how to help develop and assess critical-thinking skills in your students.

Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking

Ideally, teaching kids how to think critically becomes an integral part of your approach, no matter what subject you teach. But if you're just getting started, here are some concrete ways you can begin leveraging your students' critical-thinking skills in the classroom and beyond. 1. Questions, questions, questions. Questioning is at the heart of critical thinking, so you want to create an environment where intellectual curiosity is fostered and questions are encouraged. In the beginning stages, you may be doing most of the asking to show your students the types of questions that will lead to higher-level thinking and understanding. 2. Pose a provocative question to build an argument around and help your students break it down. 3. 4. 5. Lively discussions usually involve some degree of differing perspectives. Tools for metacognition.

Metacognition is an important part of intentional learning, since it involves actively thinking about what you know, what you don’t know, and how you can get better at knowing and applying what you know.

Tools for metacognition

A mantra for metacognition State the learning problem with some specificity: identify what you want to know and what you want to do with that knowledgeChoose strategies to solve the learning problem—draw upon your own prior knowledge and the knowledge of othersObserve how you used the strategies—keep a learning journal or blogEvaluate the results: What worked? What didn’t work? Rinse and repeat: Apply successful strategies to new learning problems By definition, metacognition involves individual commitment and reflection.