Tragedy of the Commons The concept of the Tragedy of the Commons is extremely important for understanding the degradation of our environment. The concept was clearly expressed for the first time by Garrett Hardin in his now famous article in Science in 1968, which is "widely accepted as a fundamental contribution to ecology, population theory, economics and political science." Hardin: University of California Santa Barbara. Tragedy of the Commons Tragedy of the Commons
Rio Declaration - Rio Declaration on Environment and Development - United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Rio Declaration on Environment and Development The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, Having met at Rio de Janeiro from 3 to 14 June 1992, Reaffirming the Declaration of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, adopted at Stockholm on 16 June 1972, and seeking to build upon it, With the goal of establishing a new and equitable global partnership through the creation of new levels of cooperation among States, key sectors of societies and people, Rio Declaration - Rio Declaration on Environment and Development - United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
Agenda 21
habitat.igc.apc.org/agenda21/forest.htm Rio Declasration | Agenda 21 | Alternative Treaties | Information Ecology | Information Habitat Non-Legally Binding Authoritative Statement of Principles for a Global Consensus on the Management, Conservation and Sustainable Development of all Types of Forests Preamble Forest Principles - from the 1992 Earth Summit Forest Principles - from the 1992 Earth Summit
Water for Life
Environment - Data & Statistics DATA and STATISTICS SEARCH Search for Data by Topic Search for Data by Country Search for Data by Region or Income GEF Secretariat Project Map: This database provides a list of all Global Environment Facility (GEF) projects, worldwide, from all implementing agencies. Environment Monitors: This publication series, which includes seven countries and numerous environmental themes, is an excellent source of data and statistics on the environment. Environment - Data & Statistics
Environment - Major Reports Related to China AAA China Water Scarcity AAA Reports Available for Download Other Recent Bank Contributions and Involvement The Bank has been assisting in the water sector, both urban and rural, for many years. This assistance has included sectoral analyses, technical assistance, and lending. Environment - Major Reports Related to China AAA
Environment - Addressing Water Scarcity in China Chinese Version- 中文 Objective of the AAA Program Design Major Thematic Studies Major Expected Outputs Links to Further Information Environment - Addressing Water Scarcity in China
Water Resources Management | World Bank – Water
Water crisis Water crisis "In Meatu district, Shinyanga region, Tanzania, water most often comes from open holes dug in the sand of dry riverbeds, and it is invariably contaminated." Physical water scarcity and economic water scarcity by country. 2006 Water scarcity is the lack of sufficient available water resources to meet the demands of water usage within a region. It already affects every continent and around 2.8 billion people around the world at least one month out of every year.
0221-waterstress-EN.jpg (JPEG Image, 1200×783 pixels) - Scaled (81%)
Water for Life
The Increasing Currency and Relevance of Rights-Based Perspectives in the International Negotiations on Climate Change Lavanya Rajamani* + Author Affiliations It is axiomatic that the climate impacts documented by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are likely to undermine the realisation of a range of protected human rights. Yet it is only in the recent past that an explicit human rights approach has been brought to bear on the climate change problem. The Increasing Currency and Relevance of Rights-Based Perspectives in the International Negotiations on Climate Change
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

Safeguarding Future Retirement Funds – Time for Investors to Move Out of High-Carbon Assets Says UN’s Top Climate Official At the Investor Summit on Climate Risk on 15 January in New York, UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres urged investors to accelerate the greening of their portfolios as one crucial step towards a low-carbon economy that can better cope with the threats and seize the opportunities from climate change. Press release (151 kB) esp (204 kB)
2007 United Nations Climate Change Conference 2007 United Nations Climate Change Conference Secretary of UNFCCCYvo de Boer opens the United Nations Climate Change Conference on December 3, 2007, in Bali Indonesia. The 2007 United Nations Climate Change Conference took place at the Bali International Conference Centre, Nusa Dua, in Bali, Indonesia, between December 3 and December 15, 2007 (though originally planned to end on 14 December).[1] Representatives from over 180 countries attended, together with observers from intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations.[2] The conference encompassed meetings of several bodies, including the 13th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 13), the 3rd Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (MOP 3 or CMP 3), together with other subsidiary bodies and a meeting of ministers.[2] Negotiations on a successor to the Kyoto Protocol dominated the conference.
2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference Connie Hedegaard, former president of the UN Climate Change Conference 2009 in Copenhagen (left chair to Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen on 16 December)[1] The 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference, commonly known as the Copenhagen Summit, was held at the Bella Center in Copenhagen, Denmark, between 7 and 18 December. The conference included the 15th Conference of the Parties (COP 15) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the 5th Meeting of the Parties (MOP 5) to the Kyoto Protocol.
After the 2007 United Nations Climate Change Conference on the island Bali in Indonesia in December, 2007 the participating nations adopted the Bali Road Map as a two-year process to finalizing a binding agreement in 2009 in Copenhagen. The conference encompassed meetings of several bodies, including the 13th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 13) and the 3rd Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (MOP 3 or CMP 3). The Bali Road Map includes the Bali Action Plan (BAP) that was adopted by Decision 1/CP.13 of the COP-13. Bali Road Map
United Nations Climate Change Conference, 3-14 December, Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, (COP 13 and CMP 3) Bali Climate Change Conference - December 2007 The Bali Road Map The 13th session of the Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC and the 3rd session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol took place in Bali and was hosted by the Government of Indonesia. Also sitting were the twenty-seventh sessions of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI) and the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) and the resumed fourth session of the Ad hoc Working Group on Further Commitments for Annex I Parties under the Kyoto Protocol (AWG-KP).
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a scientific intergovernmental body,[1][2] set up at the request of member governments.[3] It was first established in 1988 by two United Nations organizations, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and later endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly through Resolution 43/53. Its mission is to provide comprehensive scientific assessments of current scientific, technical and socio-economic information worldwide about the risk of climate change caused by human activity, its potential environmental and socio-economic consequences, and possible options for adapting to these consequences or mitigating the effects.[4] It is chaired by Rajendra K. Pachauri.

IPCC

Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis The Summary for Policymakers of the Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report was approved, and the full report accepted, by the IPCC on 27 September 2013. The finalized version of the Summary for Policymakers was published on 11 November 2013 and is available for download below. For more on how the Working Group I report was prepared click here. Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability

IPCC - Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Tim Flannery

Environment
China's dam projects

The List: The World's Lost Environmental Causes
The environment: Defending science
The Stories You Missed in 2010 - By Joshua E. Keating
By invitation: The truth about the environment
"It's Going to Make a Huge Mess" - An Interview with Wallace Broecker
Mean and Green
Bjorn Lomberg

Greenwashing Hydropower: The Problems with Big Dams
Seven Answers to Climate Contrarian Nonsense