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Product Research (Router/NAS etc)

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QNAP TS-x53 Pro Turbo NAS Family Reviewed - Performance - Comparative, Closing. Performance - Comparative Whether you use Windows File Copy or NASPT File Copy benchmarks, the results show that all the x53 Pro models pretty much max out the capability of a single Gigabit Ethernet connection for RAID 5 writes.

QNAP TS-x53 Pro Turbo NAS Family Reviewed - Performance - Comparative, Closing

But so do their less-expensive dual-core Celeron x51 series equivalents, like the TS-451. On the other hand, RAID 5 read shows a more significant 10 MB/s gap between the TS-451 and TS-453 Pro. NASPT RAID 5 File Copy comparison Comparing two-drive RAID 1 performance tells a similar story, except with closer read results. NASPT RAID 1 File Copy comparison Using the NAS Ranker with no filtering shows the x53 Pro pack trailing Thecus' i3-based N8850 Top Tower, Pentium G620-based N6850 Top Tower and Xeon-based N10850.

Comparing the six bay TS-653 Pro and Thecus N6850 shows a mix of pluses and minuses. QNAP TS-653 Pro, Thecus N6850 Performance Summary Comparison. QNAP TS-251 & TS-451 Turbo NASes Reviewed - Features, Transcoding, Performance - Summaries. Features Section written by Tim Higgins Craig recently reviewed QTS 4.1 QNAP's most recent NAS OS.

QNAP TS-251 & TS-451 Turbo NASes Reviewed - Features, Transcoding, Performance - Summaries

QNAP also has a live demo that allows you to explore the features. Currently, the demo is based on QTS 4.1.0. Since that review, QNAP has released 4.1.1, which appears to introduce some significant changes. HybridDesk Station must first itself be installed and also provides installers for the CodexPack required to enable hardware transcoding in HS-251, TS-X51 and TS-X53 models. HybridDesk Station I'm sure QNAP has its reasons, but having this mini App Center is confusing. On-The-Fly Transcoding A specific example is what happened when I tried to test real-time transcoding. QTS 4.1.0 and 4.1.1 Transcode Management screens I had a false start trying to use the now obsolete QMobile app (replaced with QFile) on a Nexus 7, which sent me chasing my tail working with the now equally obsolete Multimedia Station (replaced with separate Photo, Music and Video Stations NAS apps). Performance Summaries. NAS Charts - File Copy Write Performance.

How To Buy a Wireless Router: 2014 Edition. Tue, 14 Jan 2014 14:16 Tim Higgins Introduction At SmallNetBuilder, we're big on having shoppers understand their requirements so that they can buy a product that best suits their needs.

How To Buy a Wireless Router: 2014 Edition

But not everyone, especially those of us whose first interest is not home networking, wants to know the intimate details of how wireless routers work. So if you don't want (or care) to get into the details behind what makes a wireless router tick and just want the essential information you'll need to avoid taking home the wrong router, then this article is for you. Router Types There are now two basic types of routers: These type abbreviations come from the IEEE 802.11 standard they are based on, i.e. 802.11g, 802.11n and 802.11ac.

All AC routers are dual-band, meaning products operate in both the 2.4 and 5 GHz Wi-Fi frequency bands. The main variations within each router type are: Port Speed - WAN and LAN ports are Gigabit Ethernet (10/100/1000 Mbps) or 10/100 Mbps. Router Charts - WAN to LAN Throughput. How To Convert a Wireless Router into an Access Point. Mon, 10 Mar 2008 02:00 Tim Higgins This article describes a method for routers that do not have a built-in access point (AP) mode.

How To Convert a Wireless Router into an Access Point

If your router has an AP mode, do not use these instructions. I used to have a FAQ that explained how to re-purpose a wireless router as an access point (AP). But it occurred to me that some folks might be able to use a little more of a step-by-step, so here it is. I'm going to use the virtually ubiquitous Linksys WRT54G as the object of our conversion. Step 1: Connect a computer that is set to obtain its IP address information automatically to a LAN port on the wireless router that you want to convert to an AP. Figure 1: Checking for "Obtain an IP address automatically" Log into the admin page of the wireless router that you want to convert to an access point. Step 2: For simple, one segment LANs, there must be only one DHCP server. Figure 2: Shut off the DHCP server; change the IP Step 3: Find your LAN Router's DHCP server range. Figure 3: LAN router settings. How To Buy a Wireless Router: 2014 Edition.