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Stirling Bridge

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In 1297 Longshanks thought he had Scotland under his control, an kingless. The Wallace tho was wagin an effective campaign against the English occupiers, an so Edward sent a force north.

Efter ravagin Berwick an routin the Scots at Dunbar, this force met wi Wallace at Stirlin Brig. Tho fieldin a smaller force, Wallace's tactics won the day, the English were routed, an Wallace became a national hero... Battle of Stirling Bridge. The Battle of Stirling Bridge was a battle of the First War of Scottish Independence. On 11 September 1297, the forces of Andrew Moray and William Wallace defeated the combined English forces of John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, and Hugh de Cressingham near Stirling, on the River Forth.

The main battle[edit] The Scots waited as the english knights and infantry made their slow progress across the bridge on the morning of 11 September. The disorderly Scottish army of 1296 was gone: Wallace and Moray's hold over their men was tight. The present-day Stirling Bridge Surrey, who was left with a pitiful contingent of archers, had remained to the south of the river and was still in a strong position. The location of Stirling Bridge at the date of the battle is not known with certainty, but four stone piers have been found underwater just north ( WikiMiniAtlas Aftermath[edit] The battle in fiction[edit] A Victorian depiction of the battle. Notes[edit] References[edit] Barrow, G. External links[edit] Battle of stirling bridge. The Battle of Stirling Bridge was a battle of the First War of Scottish Independence.

On 11 September 1297, the forces of Andrew Moray and William Wallace defeated the combined English forces of John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey and Hugh de Cressingham near Stirling, on the River Forth. John de Warenne had won a comfortable victory over the aristocracy of Scotland at the Battle of Dunbar, and his belief that he was now dealing with a rabble seems to have affected his judgment. The small bridge at Stirling was only broad enough to allow two horsemen to cross abreast.

The Scots deployed in a commanding position dominating the soft, flat ground to the north of the river. Sir Richard Lundie, a Scots knight who joined the English after the capitulation at Irvine, offered to outflank the enemy by leading a cavalry force over a nearby ford, where sixty horsemen could cross at the same time. Scottish casualties in the battle are unrecorded, with the exception of Andrew Moray.

Scottish History - Summary Index. Sir William Wallace, from his Monument. ............and what led to it. Prologue ----------- The situation leading up the confrontation of loyal Scots under the command of Sir William Wallace against the powerful Anglo-Norman army of Edwards I's Northern English forces at Stirling Bridge is a bit complex. After a properous and relatively peaceful reign under King Alexander III, Scotland was enjoying economic success and some degree of peace with it's southern neighbour England.

With Alexander's tragic death in 1286 A.D., all of the old problems and new ones came crashing down on Scotland leading to what is now called the "First war of Scottish Independence". Background: Scotland, 1286 A.D. Edward I of England had only recently completed phase one of his conquest of Wales by defeating the forces of Prince Llywelyn. Edward had shown his military tactics in battles in Wales, England and France, to be very effective, if not cruel and ruthless. Edward wanted to dominate Scotland. The Battle of Stirling Bridge - Wars of Independence. Edward I’s army under the command of John de Warenne and Hugh de Cressingham planned to cross the River Forth at Stirling. The narrow wooden bridge offered the safest river crossing as the Forth widened to the east and the treacherous marshland of Flanders Moss lay to the west.

William Wallace and Andrew Moray had arrived at Abbey Craig, north of Stirling, before the English army. They watched from the hilltop as the English force - made up of English, Welsh and Scots knights, bowmen and foot soldiers - made camp to the south of the river. The English army had between 200 to 300 cavalry and 10,000 foot soldiers to the Scots' 36 horsemen and 8000 foot. John de Warrene gave orders for the English army to cross Stirling Bridge to face the Scots next morning. Two Dominican friars were sent as envoys to negotiate the surrender of the Scots with Wallace and Moray.

Tell your commander that we are not here to make peace but to do battle, defend ourselves and liberate our kingdom. The Battle of Stirling Bridge, 11th September 1297 - Everything Scottish: Scottish History - Scottish Clans Tartans Kilts Crests and Gifts. Re: The Battle of Stirling Bridge, 11th September 1297 from Leslie T: Ex-Member (deleted:true_thomas) on Fri 10/09/10 19:16 After the English victory at the Battle of Dunbar in 1296, two of the many Scots knights captured and imprisoned in the Tower of London were Sir Andrew de Moray of Petty and his brother, Sir William de Moray.

Sir Andrew's son, also named Andrew de Moray, had been kept in Chester Castle for a while but had either been released or escaped. He returned north to his native Moray, arriving in the spring of 1297. By this time Sir William had been released after agreeing to fight in Edward's campaigns in Flanders. Sir William however languished in the Tower, refusing to take part in any of the English King's campaigns. Edward I was made aware of the rising in the north-east of Scotland until June 1297. It was around this time that William Wallace and Andrew de Moray met in a council of war, gathered their forces and marched south.

1297 Battle of Stirling Bridge Scottish Clans Tartans Kilts Crests and Gifts. Scotland was entirely submissive to England by 1296. Following English victories at Dunbar and Berwick, John Balliol had surrendered himself and was taken as a prisoner to England. Edward I toured his new possession as far north as Elgin and removed the Stone of Destiny from Scone to take it back to London. He installed the Earl of Surrey, John de Warenne as Governor of Scotland and Hugh de Cressingham was made the treasurer. Until now, William Wallace was considered by the English as merely an irritating criminal. On 10 September the English reached the Forth. The army of Wallace and Murray had been waiting up on the Abbey Craig and on the morning of the 11th, once roughly half of Cressingham’s men had crossed the bridge, the rebels attacked. Amid huge English losses, Surrey turned and ran for Berwick.

Cressingham’s skin was used to make souvenirs. The beautiful Wallace Monument was built upon Abbey Craig. The battle of Stirling Bridge : Scotland Magazine Issue 34. James Irvine Robertson describes the battle of Stirling Bridge and Wallace's legendary defeat over the English One of the problems about early Scottish history is the lack of sources. Edward I deliberately removed and destroyed most of the records that existed before the 14th century. Those that survived were taken by Oliver Cromwell and, at the Restoration, the ships carrying them back north sank. Thus the activities of William Wallace are very difficult to tease out of myth. Andrew Wytoun said ‘Hym worthyed a gret buke to wryte’ but he did not write it, and Blind Harry was a propagandist two centuries later for whom accuracy was not an issue. But if Scots sources do not help, the English ones, through a fog of bile, are rather better.

The earliest map of Scotland gives the country an extraordinary wasp waist with the sea being separated by only the tiniest isthmus at Stirling. Wallace joined forces with him and the two charismatic men shared leadership of the resulting Scots army. 13th Century Scotland - History - The battle of stirling bridge 1297 - Scottish wars of independence. The Battle of Stirling Bridge The Battle of Stirling Bridge took place near the Old Bridge over the River Forth which connects the town to the causeway leading west towards Bridge of Allan.

The more modern (although still 500 years old) present day stone bridge, lies more or less, on the spot of the ancient, narrow wooden bridge where the outcome of the battle hinged. Wallace and Murray arrived at Stirling before the English did and took up position near and on the Abbey Craig. The approaching English army has been estimated at some two hundred knights and mounted men-at-arms and ten thousand foot-soldiers, against the waiting Scottish force of thirty-six cavalry and eight thousand foot, made up of lesser gentry, burgesses and countrymen. Before the battle the English side made peace overtures to the Scots but they were refused point blank by Wallace. This sensible tactical advice was rejected and was to be the downfall of the English troops.

Battle of Stirling Brig' Date - 11th September 1297Combatants - William Wallace of Elderslie .v. Earl of Surrey (commander-in-chief of Scotland under Edward I)Setting - Royal Burgh of Stirling, ScotlandDescription - First of all. Forget everything you've seen in Braveheart. Wallace's victory was not in a field, it was over a bridge - Stirling Bridge. This is the real account of what happened at the battle. This is quite a long report, so I've highlighted a few main point if you don't want to read the whole thing. The beggining of the descriptionWallace goes into action as he hears of the English approachThe account of the battle With many of his Barons hostile, Edward was desperately trying to raise an army to use against France.

When the nobles arrived north, they found the situation far worse then they had been told. Wallace and Moray had not been idle. Finally, the Earl of Surray, Edwards Viceroy in Scotland, decided he should do something. Painting of the Battle. The Battle of Stirling Bridge. William Wallace led his troops to victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge on the 11th of September, 1297.

Sir William Wallace is one of the most recognised figures of Scottish history. His deeds as ‘Braveheart’ took place over a very short period of time and he only fought two major battles against the English invaders. Wallace’s record was 1:1, but the battle he won was a magnificent result. Scotland at the time was without its King as John Balliol was held prisoner in the Tower of London after having lost the Battle of Dunbar, in 1295.

Much has been made of the ‘inactivity’ of the Scottish Nobles, but many of them were caught between a rock and a hard place. The Battle of Stirling Bridge took place on the 11th of September, 1297, by the original wooden bridge on the north bank of the River Forth at Stirling, in the shadow of Abbey Craig. The main problem of the English was that they could cross the bridge only a couple of Knights at a time. The Battle Of Stirling Bridge 12 97. With many of his Barons hostile, Edward was desperately trying to raise an army to use against France. This situation left him with no troops to send north against the Scots. He therefore decided to release several of the Scottish nobles he had been keeping prisoner since Dunbar.

Among them were Alexander Comyn and the Earl of Buchan, who were released on the condition that they quell the disturbances. When the nobles arrived north, they found the situation far worse then they had been told. They sent various letters to King Edward expressing their loyalty and hopes of success. Wallace and Moray had not been idle. Finally, the Earl of Surray, Edwards Viceroy in Scotland, decided he should do something. On hearing of this approach, Moray and Wallace joined forces and moved south to meet him and defend Stirling. James Stewart and the Earl of Lennox were hovering on the outskirts with a troop of cavalry, uncertain weather to join Moray and Wallace. William Wallace, Battles of Stirling Bridge & Falkirk. William Wallace and the Battle of Stirling Bridge, Pt.1. William Wallace and the Battle of Stirling Bridge, Pt.1 Part One Background: Scotland, 1286 A.D. Edward I of England had only recently completed phase one of his conquest of Wales by defeating the forces of Prince Llywelyn.

Edward, for all of his disreputable charateristics, was indeed one of England's most powerful and effective rulers, particularly in his military campaigns. At the time, Anglo-Norman England commanded the most powerful, best equipped, armed military forces in all of Europe. Edward had shown his military tactics in battles in Wales, England and France, to be very effective, if cruel and ruthless. He was indeed an enemy to be feared.

It was Welsh misfortune to choose to fight with one of England's most powerful rulers. Alexander III Alexander's heirs, his daughter and wife had died before him, and no direct adult heir was available to fill the now vacant throne of Scotland. Edward Becomes Involved in the Political Situation Longshanks Edward wanted to dominate Scotland. Scotland's Past - William Wallace. The site of the bridge itself was discovered in the early 1990's only a little way from where the later stone bridge was built. The English army under John de Warenne and Hugh Cressingham, arrived early in September 1297 and Walter of Guisborough gives the numbers in the English army as 50,000 foot soldiers and 1,000 cavalry, although these numbers are almost certainly exaggerated there would still have been many more English than the 10,000 or so Scots.

It seems that James the Steward and Malcolm, the Earl of Lennox had negotiations with the English but these may only have been stalling tactics to allow the Scots army to finish its preparations. Wallace had instructed that the bridge be weakened so: Blind Harry then goes on to describe in detail the battle and this is the version of events that are still used in most accounts of that day in Stirling: "The day of battle does approach at length, The English then advance with all their strength. From Blind Harry's 'Wallace'

The Battle of Stirling Bridge was William Wallace's greatest victory over the English. 11th September, 1297 The Battle of Stirling Bridge was William Wallace´s most famous battle. A Scottish force of around 7,000 infantry and 150 cavalry under the command of Wallace and Andrew Murray defeated an English force of 18,000 infantry and 750 cavalry under the command of John de Warenne, the Earl of Surrey and Hugh de Cressingham. On the morning of battle the Scots occupied a commanding position to the north of the river on the Abbey Craig hill. They waited patiently as the English slowly began to cross the narrow bridge and when as many as they thought they could overcome had crossed they charged and cut the English army in two. The heavy cavalry was slaughtered along with around 5,000 infantry as the rest of the English looked on helplessly from the south bank of the river, only one English knight, Sir Marmaduke Tweng, made it back across the bridge and the hated Cressingham himself was killed in the attack.

Battle of Stirling Bridge. 5,000 infantry killed[2] Scottish Independence The Battle of Stirling Bridge was a battle of the First War of Scottish Independence. On 11 September 1297, the forces of Andrew Moray and William Wallace defeated the combined English forces of John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey and Hugh de Cressingham near Stirling, on the River Forth. The battle The Scots waited as the English knights and infantry made their slow progress across the bridge on the morning of 11 September.

The disorderly Scottish army of 1296 was gone: Wallace and Moray's hold over their men was firm. Full article ▸ Stirling Council - The Wars - Stirling Bridge. The Battle Of Stirling Bridge. Wallace monument abbey craig stirling scotland. 4. The Battle Of Stirling Bridge - Glow Wikis. An Engineer's Aspect: The Stirling Bridge Collapse of 1297. Scotland's History - The Battle of Stirling Bridge, 1297. Battle of Stirling Bridge. The 11th of September 1297 AD, Battle of Stirling Bridge.

Battle of Stirling Bridge - War of Scottish Independence - William Wallace. Medieval - The Battle of Battle of Stirling Bridge. Inventory of Scottish Battlefields NGR centred: NJ 562 163 - Walking the Battlefields: Stirling Bridge (1297), Falkirk (1298) and Bannockburn (1314) Historic Scotland Data Website - Battlefields: Battle of Stirling Bridge. Traditional Scottish Songs - Battle of Stirling. Andrew Murray Feature Page on Undiscovered Scotland. William Wallace. Sir William Wallace.

Wallace Monument. Wallace Monument. Stirling Castle. Stirling Castle.