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Etsy or Indiemade? And should you blog on Indiemade? I received a question yesterday from Sandy, of Sandra Fox Designs, and I wanted to post this here because I think this is something that just about all of us handmade sellers have wondered about at some point or another. With so many options for selling, and hosting, and blogging, and ugh... how do you know which is the best to choose?

This was her question: I have two etsy shops www.paintedsilkgifts.etsy.com and www.SandraFoxDesigns.etsy.com. I am thinking of creating a website with Indiemade that will maybe push back to my etsy shop ( haven’t decided yet about that ). Alrighty, so here’s what I’ve got to say about this: I definitely do recommend Indiemade as a shopping cart solution, but that’s all I use it for.

Indiemade is great as a shopping cart because you can make it look a little more like a part of your own website than you can an Etsy shop, and it’s just nice and simple and cheap. With that being said, I do still have a shop on Etsy. I hope that helps! Lorelei's Blog: Etsy Vs. Indiemade. I have been getting a lot of emails lately from people wondering what I think of Indiemade, why I have both shops, and if I think they should start an Indiemade site. I thought it might be a good time to lay it all out on the table and share my experiences here. These are only my opinions and of course, you should do your research completely before making a decision either way. Here's a screen shot of my Indiemade site. It's pretty right? :)I like the look of it, I like the big banner, I like the layout. Everything is easy to read and not confusing. I can post links to my tutorials, ebooks, etsy shop, blog etc. Here's a screen shot of my Etsy shop. Etsy is a marketplace.

Also- Indiemade rivals etsy when it comes to customer service. Purchasing: A misconception about Indiemade- you need to be a member to purchase from an Indiemade store. You also can pay using a credit card instead of a paypal account by merely clicking the link at the sign-in screen to says "pay with credit card"! 15 DIY crafts you need to make right now. It's cold, it's raining and quite frankly, it's utterly miserable outside at the moment. So stay in! But then it hits you. It's not that great inside either. You're young, so you haven't got all of that furniture and all of the little decorative trinkets that accumulate over time, and if you have, you haven't got nearly enough. So we say, make them! Instead of spending your time sitting around moaning about the weather, why not spend your time doing something useful? Why not spend your time crafting some of these?

Freshers Fields is back for 2013! 1. Source Stick your button collection around a balloon (and importantly) to each other. 2. Source Glue, buttons, cardboard and a bit of artistic ingenuity and you'll have yourself a great sign for your bedroom door (assuming you use the first letter of your first name). 3. Simply wash out a screw top spirit bottle, find a screw top soap dispenser and put it together. 4. Source 5. 6. Source 7. 8. 9. Source 10. Source 11. Source Hollow them out and plant. 100 Ways to Repurpose Everything (Mega Roundup!) Think this title is a tall order? Well, you’re in for a post of epic eco-tastic proportions. So epic that you may need to give your computer or mobile device an extra moment to load all of our pretty pictures. Seeing as we love to repurpose just about anything under the sun, we’re celebrating Earth Day by serving up 100 of our favorite ways to upcycle, reuse, and transform everyday materials into creative new things to wear, hang on the wall, and give to friends. 1.

Newspaper Party Hats: We’ll kick things off with a must for any celebration: party hats! 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. How to Make Clothing Buttons from Shrink Plastic… | scissors.paper.wok - StumbleUpon. This tutorial is an old one of mine that’s too good not to share again. Since posting the first time, I’ve had lots of questions about these buttons which will hopefully be answered in this revised post. Equipment Some handy notes: 1. The buttons. The buttons are cut from shrink paper.

The brand of shrink paper I used was called Shrinkles which I got from the UK. Single hole, hole punch (like this one here). 2. 3. Okay.. lets get started! Tracing tips: You can use either coloured pencils or permanent pens. Words must be writted backwards in order to be readable. Shrinking the buttons: To shrink the buttons, you can use an oven or a heat gun (the kind used for embellishing). After the buttons have twisted and twirled, and are LYING FLAT, it’s time to take them out. Note: If the skrinking is taking too long, you may need to turn your oven up. Here’s a short little stop-motion to make sure you’ve got the gist of how easy this is! Shrink Paper {here} Circle Punch {here} Hole punch {here} Pens {here} Notebook Stories: A Blog About Notebooks, Journals, Moleskines, Blank Books, Sketchbooks, Diaries and More. Art Journal Every Day Archive. Watercolor Cards.

If you have been loving the watercolor and ombre trend recently, you are going to LOVE this amazing DIY Sarah is bringing us today! She is sharing a sweet way to ask your bridesmaids if they will stand by your side on your wedding day. This DIY is so adorable and super easy! It is even more awesome because this technique can be applied to so many elements in your wedding (hello, fabulous escort cards and favor tags!)

It’s DIY time again, lovely readers! Materials Watercolor paper cut into 9″x6.25″ rectangles, folded into cards(size A6: 4.5″x6.25″), 1 per bridesmaidWatercolor paints (the cheap Crayola one will work just fine!) Helpful hints: Using a bone folder to fold the paper is very helpful, since watercolor paper tends to be thicker than printer or scrapbooking paper. Step 1: Cut all of the paper (watercolor and scrapbook) to the sizes indicated above. Step 2: After the design is fully traced onto the card, un-tape and place on your work surface.

Share: Spectacular Moleskine Doodles Explode with Energy - My Modern Met. Philippines-based illustrator Kerby Rosanes proves that doodling can be so much more than scratching unintelligible scribbles on paper. Through his Sketchy Stories blog, Rosanes shares his wonderful world of doodling in a simple Moleskine sketchbook. Equipped with an ordinary Moleskine, a few Uni Pin drawing pens, and his innate gift for drawing, the artist is able to transport viewers to a world where tiny, cartoonish creatures explode with gusto to make up larger entities. Each of the illustrator's complex and crowded sketches are filled with minute details that allow the eye to wander and discover new characters and designs at every turn. The portraits are immediately mesmerizing, but even more spectacular when looked upon closely. Rosanes says that he's on a bit of an illustration high from merging animals with his "crazy doodle monsters" but admits, "I’m liking the results of every fusion.

" Kerby Rosanes websiteKerby Rosanes on deviantART via [Gaks] 100 Amazing Ways to Hack Your Moleskine Notebook. Gesso. ©2004 - 2006 by Aisling D'Art Gesso is a useful option for art journaling. It's also used for painting and mixed media art. I use gesso often. However, many (perhaps most) artists never use gesso in their journals. Here's what gesso is and tips for how you can use it. Gesso can go under paint or heavy collage or embellishments, to make your journal pages stronger. Gesso is a primer. Originally, gesso only came in white. Gesso makes the surface a little stiffer. Today, gesso comes in many colors. It's useful for mixed media work as well as fine art paintings.

Gesso is different from paint. Originally, gesso was a mixture of calcium--like chalk--in a thin base of animal glue. When you see religious paintings and icons on wood, they were probably painted over gesso. But, gesso changed in the 20th century. In recent years, some artists have begun to question whether or not acrylic gesso is the right product to use under oil paint. When I journal, I use white gesso as well as black gesso.