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Wide Sargasso Sea Lecture Series. Women Making Progress?: a Study of Wide Sargasso Sea as a Respons. The Victim of Colonization: Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea. The Victim of Colonization: Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea H.

The Victim of Colonization: Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea

Gul Koparanoglu (Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey) [BIO] Email: gulkop@gmail.com. Identity Crisis for the Creole W. Identity Crisis for the Creole Woman: A Search for Self in Wide Sargasso Sea Stephanie Coartney “‘And how will you like that’ I thought, as I kissed him.

Identity Crisis for the Creole W

‘How will you like being made exactly like other people?’” (Rhys 22). Although some literary critics view Rhys’s representation of Antoinette as the classic case of a woman’s descent into madness to escape masculine domination, the novel itself can more effectively serve as “a reconceptualization of the very concept of identity” (Emery 167). Antoinette’s classification as a Creole, or the mixed product of Caribbean black and European white races, presents one major aspect of her character in which she receives conflicting social messages regarding her overall identity. In the same way that Creoles suffer rejection by the black community of which they are a part, they are also treated as “the other” by their white European counterparts whose political power and wealth allow them to maintain significant influence over Caribbean society. Rochester as the new type of colonizer. In her twentieth-century adaptation of Jane Eyre, Jean Rhys addresses issues of post-colonialism which are only alluded to in Brontë's twentieth-century work.

Rochester as the new type of colonizer

Key Critical Quotations Angela Smith. Panizza. Wide Sargasso Sea – The Dark Continent of Jean Rhys. What I see is nothing – I want what it hides – that is not nothing.

Wide Sargasso Sea – The Dark Continent of Jean Rhys

Identity Crisis for the Creole W. JSS 2014121510222187. The Fated Modernist Heroine: Female Protagonists in <span class="book">Jane Eyre</span> and Wide Sargasso Sea. Ean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea is a modernist revision of Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre.

The Fated Modernist Heroine: Female Protagonists in <span class="book">Jane Eyre</span> and Wide Sargasso Sea

The female protagonists of both novels share many traits of character and circumstance, most notable of which being a marriage to Mr. Rochester. Jane can assert notions of female individuality and self-respect because she operates in a society based on Christian virtues of justice and fairness. The Experience of Womanhood in "Jane Eyre" and "Wide Sargasso Sea"

Wide Sargasso Sea was Jean Rhys's effort to rewrite, or more accurately, to elaborate on and complicate, the history presented by Charlotte Brontë's classic novel, Jane Eyre.

The Experience of Womanhood in "Jane Eyre" and "Wide Sargasso Sea"

The eponymous protagonist of Jane Eyre develops into a fiercely independent, self-assured, moral, and passionate young woman. The protagonist of Rhys's text is the character who Jane will know later only as Rochester's lunatic wife who is locked in the attic. Rhys explores this character who Brontë herself acknowledged was left somewhat unexplained (Thorpe 175). Reading and Discussion Questions for Rhys' "Wide Sargasso Sea" Across the Wide Sargasso Sea: Jean Rhyss Revision of Charlotte Brontës Eurocentric Gothic. Through the character of Christophine, Jean Rhys introduces the motif of witchcraft into the text.

Across the Wide Sargasso Sea: Jean Rhyss Revision of Charlotte Brontës Eurocentric Gothic

Realistically motivated by the West Indian context, witchcraft does not merely function as a picturesque inscription of native culture but as a metaphor of the relationship between language and power, and more specifically of the mechanisms by which the subaltern is silenced by master narratives. Wide Sargasso Sea exhibits the processing, transformation and distortion of reality by the dominant idiom, that "tread machine" (11), to use Christophine's image, which leaves the subaltern with an inoperative language, incapable of acting upon reality. Although, as Gayatri Spivak puts it, Christophine is "a commodified person" who was given to Antoinette's mother as a wedding present and is "tangential to [Jean Rhys's] narrative" (1985, pp. 252-253), she nonetheless plays a prominent role in the drama and in the local communities. Is neither informational nor communicational. Searching for identity and love: An analysis of ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’

Jean Rhys chooses Jamaica—known as the Wide Sargasso Sea—as the setting and climax of Antoinette and Rochester’s marriage.

Searching for identity and love: An analysis of ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’

Rhys also chooses Antoinette as the main protagonist in her novel. Opposing oppositional themes of passion and deception are the circumstantial plot customary in Jamaica. By utilizing scenic imagery, Rhys reinforces images of turbulent weather, chaos, and destruction the two bring into their marriage. The literary tone provides Rhys’ protagonist a chance to narrate her own story before she is renamed Bertha by Rochester in Charlotte Bronte’s novel Jane Eyre,—the maniac with no identity locked in the attic and given commands to “only make less noise” at the Thornfield estate—allowing neither Antoinette nor Rochester escapism. In utilizing literary themes of conflict that life entails, Rhys challenges us to embraces the inevitable destruction. ‘There was no one to tell, no one to listen. These are similar observational themes writer, M.M. Literary critic, John S. Authorial Devices and the Importance of Setting in Rhys' "Wide Sargasso Sea"

Although Wide Sargasso Sea presents itself as a distinctly modern rewriting of Jane Eyre, Jean Rhys clearly adopts more than a general plotline, or paradigm from her Victorian predecessor.

Authorial Devices and the Importance of Setting in Rhys' "Wide Sargasso Sea"

Rhys, for example, maintains an air of the supernatural throughout her novel, and this theme often manifests itself in the author's treatment of nature as something which reflects the internal, emotional and mental chaos of the characters themselves. Thus, like Brontë, Rhys allows this expressionistic tendency to fuse matters of style and text with matters of theme and content in her novel. Using devices such as personification, symbolism, allegory and metaphor . . . sentence fragmentation, ambiguous verb tenses, and infected prose, Rhys, therefore, reveals Wide Sargasso Sea as a work which emerges out of the Victorian aesthetic and roots itself in the definitive struggle of Modernist prose.

Under the oleanders . . .I watched the hidden mountains and the mists drawn over their faces. Questions. Space, place and landscape » Wide Sargasso Sea Study Guide from Crossref-it.info. The significance of location Wide Sargasso Sea uses locations from Jean Rhys' childhood and family history.

Space, place and landscape » Wide Sargasso Sea Study Guide from Crossref-it.info

Both Coulibri and Granbois are based on estates owned by her family. This familiar landscape is very precisely defined in the novel. However, place and landscape are more than simply the setting for the action. We Deal In Dreams. Dreams in Wide Sargasso Sea Dreams are frequently used as a motif in literature. Why? In Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea, dreams are so intricately intertwined with reality that the reader often has a hard time discerning which is which. Jean Rhys uses dreams to manifest Antoinette’s emotions she is unable to express in waking life. Antoinette, the main character, has three significant dreams.

Dreams in Wide Sargasso Sea. This essay is Part II of Alan Gordon's "Dreams in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea. " The first part, which discusses Jane Eyre, reesides in the Victorian Web. Modernism, dreams and the supernatural » Wide Sargasso Sea Study Guide from Crossref-it.info.