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International Conference on Thinking. Learning & Brain Society. Wikipedia: Critical Thinking. Critical thinking is a type of clear, reasoned thinking.

Wikipedia: Critical Thinking

According to Beyer (1995) Critical thinking means making clear, reasoned judgements. While in the process of critical thinking, ideas should be reasoned and well thought out/judged.[1] The National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking defines critical thinking as the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action.'[2] Etymology[edit] In the term critical thinking, the word critical, (Grk. κριτικός = kritikos = "critic") derives from the word critic, and identifies the intellectual capacity and the means "of judging", "of judgement", "for judging", and of being "able to discern".[3]

Critical thinking web. We have over 100 online tutorials on different aspects of thinking skills.

Critical thinking web

They are organized into modules listed below and in the menu above. Our tutorials are used by universities, community colleges, and high schools around the world. The tutorials are completely free and under a Creative Commons license. More info We are currently updating the website. Maintained by Joe Lau, Philosophy Department, University of Hong Kong. Companion textbook An Introduction to Critical Thinking and Creativity: Think More, Think Better. Chinese version of this site. Concise Learning™ Youthink! Mind Tools.

Habits of Mind. OECD: Brain & Learning. EDUCERI › Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) - Brain and Learning Is the current classroom model of learning “brain-unfriendly”?

OECD: Brain & Learning

Why are students failing to master numeracy and literacy skills efficiently enough to be employable? Why are one out of six students disruptive and school-haters? Since 1999, CERI's “Brain and Learning” project has been working towards a better understanding of the learning processes of an individual’s lifecycle. The first phase of the project (1999 – 2002) brought together an international group of researchers in several fora to review potential implications of recent research findings in brain and learning sciences for policy-makers. The second phase (2002-2006), channelled its activities on three main issues: Literacy, Numeracy and Lifelong Learning within three trans-disciplinary and international networks, in which cognitive neuroscientists were challenged to tackle questions of direct educational relevance. Intute: Encouraging Critical Thinking Online.

Encouraging Critical Thinking Online is a set of free teaching resources designed to develop students' analytic abilities, using the Web as source material.

Intute: Encouraging Critical Thinking Online

Two units are currently available, each consisting of a series of exercises for classroom or seminar use. Students are invited to explore the Web and find a number of sites which address the selected topic, and then, in a teacher-led group discussion, to share and discuss their findings. The exercises are designed so that they may be used either consecutively to form a short course, or individually. The resources encourage students to think carefully and critically about the information sources they use.

The subject matter of the exercises is of relevance to a range of humanities disciplines (most especially, though by no means limited to, philosophy and religious studies), while the research skills gained will be valuable to all students. Teacher's Guide (Units 1 and 2) Printable version (PDF) Resources for Unit 1 Resources for Unit 2. Thinking Foundation. Simplicity. Organization makes a system of many appear fewer.


The home is usually the first battleground that comes to mind when facing the daily challenge of managing complexity. Stuff just seems to multiply. There are three consistent strategies for achieving simplicity in the living realm: 1) buy a bigger house, 2) put everything you don’t really need into storage, or 3) organize your existing assets in a systematic fashion. These typical solutions have mixed results. At first, a larger home lowers the clutter to space ratio. Concealing the magnitude of clutter, either through spreading it out or hiding it, is an unnuanced approach that is guaranteed to work by the first Law of reduce. However, in the long term an effective scheme for organization is necessary to achieve definitive success in taming complexity.

Net Art - Dr. Hugo Heyrman ( ( (Motions of the Mind) ) )