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Time management

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GTD Cheatsheet – An Intro on the GTD system. The system created by David Allen in his popular book Getting Things Done focuses on freeing up your mind’s RAM (or resources). The GTD system simply takes all or our mental and physical “stuff” in our lives and organizes it into a system where we can easily: 1) Act on it or 2) Store it and retrieve it later. The GTD Cheatsheet is a small, condensed version of GTD. In no ways is it a substitute, but a quick reference guide to get you back on track with Getting Things Done (or introduced if you’re never seen it before). Hopefully this mult-part series will help you quickly get your life back to organized. 1. 2. 3. The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time - Tony Schwartz. By Tony Schwartz | 8:53 AM March 14, 2012 Why is it that between 25% and 50% of people report feeling overwhelmed or burned out at work?

It’s not just the number of hours we’re working, but also the fact that we spend too many continuous hours juggling too many things at the same time. What we’ve lost, above all, are stopping points, finish lines and boundaries. Technology has blurred them beyond recognition. Wherever we go, our work follows us, on our digital devices, ever insistent and intrusive.

It’s like an itch we can’t resist scratching, even though scratching invariably makes it worse. Tell the truth: Do you answer email during conference calls (and sometimes even during calls with one other person)? The biggest cost — assuming you don’t crash — is to your productivity. I know this from my own experience. If you’re a manager, here are three policies worth promoting: 1. 2. 3. It’s also up to individuals to set their own boundaries. 1. 2. 3. 6 Things The Most Productive People Do Every Day. Ever feel like you’re just not getting enough done? Know how many days per week you’re actually productive? About 3: People work an average of 45 hours a week; they consider about 17 of those hours to be unproductive (U.S.: 45 hours a week; 16 hours are considered unproductive). We could all be accomplishing a lot more — but then again, none of us wants to be a workaholic either.

It’d be great to get tons done and have work/life balance. But how do we do that? And who better to ask than Tim Ferriss, author of the international bestseller, The 4-Hour Workweek? (Tim’s blog is here and his podcast is here.) Below are six tips Tim offered, the science behind why they work, and insight from the most productive people around. 1) Manage Your Mood Most productivity systems act like we’re robots — they forget the enormous power of feelings. If you start the day calm it’s easy to get the right things done and focus. Here’s Tim: I try to have the first 80 to 90 minutes of my day vary as little as possible.

Monotasking Is The New Multitasking. We all know multitasking is inefficient. A classic 2007 study of Microsoft workers found that when they responded to email or instant messaging alerts, it took them, on average, nearly 10 minutes to deal with their inboxes or messages, and another 10-15 minutes to really get back into their original tasks. That means that a mere three distractions per hour can preclude you from getting anything else done. Then there’s the relationship “inefficiency” that comes from multitasking. You can spend hours rebuilding the good will torched by a single glance at your phone during an inopportune time. We know this, yet we keep doing it. No human activity is immune. Fortunately, there are ways to learn to focus. Live right There are many reasons to exercise, hydrate, and get enough sleep--and the ability to fight distractions is one of them.

Tie yourself to the mast To resist the original siren song, Odysseus bound himself to his ship so he couldn’t pursue these tempting creatures. Play offense Plan. Time Management Tips: How to Find the Right Mindset to Succeed With Time Management | The Best Time Management Tips. For the past several years I have worked with time management techniques such as lists, prioritization, planning and so on. But it wasn’t until I adopted a Quadrant 2 mindset that I really started seeing results. The phrase “Quadrant 2” comes from Stephen Coveys book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People . Every task you need to do can be split into one of the 4 quadrants: 1. How to tackle the different tasks Each task needs to be tackled in a specific way, at a specific time and handled right.

Them the repercussions could be bad. Tasks as you do when working in Quadrant 1 but without all the stress and pressure of the first quadrant. Working on time management I want you to remember this mindset, use all the exercises we discuss to further increase the time you spend in Quadrant 2 and decrease the time you spend in the other Quadrants. On how to become efficient you should join The Time Management Expert Course.

I have something you are going to be interested in checking out. Comments. The Pomodoro Technique® What is The Pomodoro Technique? EASY for anyone to use! Improves productivity IMMEDIATELY! FUN to do! Why Pomodoro? The Pomodoro Technique isn’t like any other time-management method on the market today. For many people, time is an enemy. Essential to the Pomodoro Technique is the notion that taking short, scheduled breaks while working eliminates the “running on fumes” feeling you get when you’ve pushed yourself too hard. Whether it’s a call, a Facebook message, or suddenly realizing you need to change the oil in your car, many distracting thoughts and events come up when you’re at work.

Most of us are intimately acquainted with the guilt that comes from procrastinating. Who does the technique work for? These are all ways real folks use the Pomodoro Technique: Motivate yourself to write.Limit distractions.Keep track of how long you’re spending brainstorming / writing / revising.Reduce back and neck pain by walking around during Pomodoro breaks.Draft a book in three weeks. How It works.