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Stereotype & Appropriation

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Racism 101. This list includes many of the terms commonly used in anti-racism and equity discourse today.

Racism 101

They are gleaned from a variety of sources, most of which are listed at the end. Many of the terms have been in the public domain so long that the source of the original definition is no longer known as they have come into common parlance. The terminology in this field is constantly evolving, so the list remains a work in progress. Should any discrepancies arise during a training session or discussion, it is best to take a moment to determine the current understanding and why people may be more comfortable adding further definitions to the list in the present context. Ableism The cultural, institutional and individual set of practices and beliefs that assign different (lower) value to people who have developmental, emotional, physical, sensory or health-related disabilities, thereby resulting in differential treatment. Tokenism Presence without meaningful participation. Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Exercise - Learning Materials. Before reviewing these clarifications, please refer to the Typical Statements page.

Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Exercise - Learning Materials

Feigns ignorance of legitimate minority demands for the basic ideals of all humans - justice, equity, pluralism, human treatment.Same as #1 above.Assumes that racism is an individual matter rather than one of all Whites who take advantage of the benefits of a White racist dominated society.Shows a deep ignorance of the special deprivations suffered by Black people by Whites.A denial of White responsibility for dealing with White racism.

Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Exercise - Learning Materials. Put an "X" before those statements that represent your present beliefs or an "O" before those that represent previously held beliefs.

Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Exercise - Learning Materials

Once you have completed the exercise, please refer to the Clarification To The Typical Statements page. ___ Just what do these people want anyway? ___ I don't understand what you people are saying.___ On the whole, the educated, the upper classes, the emotionally mature, and the deeply religious are much less racist___ Other ethnic groups had to struggle. Why is it so different for the Blacks? ___ Angry minorities make me feel so helpless.___ Racism exists only where minorities exist. . © Judith Katz. How Racist Are You? - Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Exercise. Why the 'Cowboys-and-Indians' photo is not OK - Aboriginal - CBC.

Holly Ann McKenzie is a doctoral student at the University of British Columbia and self described 'white settler'.

Why the 'Cowboys-and-Indians' photo is not OK - Aboriginal - CBC

She grew up in Treaty Four territory and attended the University of Regina where she was a cheerleader for three years. A hard pit started to form in my stomach as I looked at the ‘Cowboys-and-Indians’ photos posted by the University of Regina cheer team: white women (well, they appear white anyways) dressed in short, tan buckskin-like dresses, one of the women with a feather in her hair, another making a ‘whooping motion.’

Cultural appropriation in and of itself is not a new phenomenon, nor is cultural appropriation by sports teams. Neither is indigenous resistance. Indigenous activists, communities and their allies are holding white-settler folks accountable for cultural appropriation, such as the recent (and recurring) misuse of headdresses as a ‘fashion’ statement and the names of many sports teams, such as the Washington Redskins. Indigenous women are hyper sexualized. The Dos and Don'ts of Cultural Appropriation. Sometime during the early 2000s, big, gold, “door-knocker” hoop earrings started to appeal to me, after I’d admired them on girls at school.

The Dos and Don'ts of Cultural Appropriation

It didn’t faze me that most of the girls who wore these earrings at my high school in St. Louis were black, unlike me. And while it certainly may have occurred to me that I—a semi-preppy dresser—couldn’t pull them off, it never occurred to me that I shouldn’t. Native Americans Weigh In On Cultural Appropriation At Music Festivals. What's Wrong with Cultural Appropriation? These 9 Answers Reveal Its Harm. Cheer Team Photo Controversey. Performance art challenges public's perception of indigenous stereotypes - Home. Sunday December 13, 2015.

Performance art challenges public's perception of indigenous stereotypes - Home

The Powerful Super Bowl Ad That Washington Redskins' Owner Dan Snyder Needs to See. This Sunday, football fans across America will be tuning into the Super Bowl for the commercials and expecting a few good laughs.

The Powerful Super Bowl Ad That Washington Redskins' Owner Dan Snyder Needs to See

But every once in a while, there's an ad that makes you really think. A new commercial from the National Congress of American Indians does exactly that: For years, America has been debating the use of the term "Redskin" by Washington's NFL team, the Washington Redskins. Though the NFL says they're listening, nothing has been done. But with this ad, the NCAI has put a human face on the story and shows exactly why the term "Redskin" is so problematic, in compressing an entire people's rich and varied identity into one stereotype. The Guardian. Reel Injun by Catherine Bainbridge, Neil Diamond, Jeremiah Hayes.

Credits director Neil Diamond co-director Catherine Bainbridge Jeremiah Hayes editor producer Christina Fon Linda Ludwick writer director of photography Édith Labbé executive producer Ernest Webb Catherine Olsen Adam Symansky Ravida Din researcher.

Reel Injun by Catherine Bainbridge, Neil Diamond, Jeremiah Hayes