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Meat. I’m honored that this often shows up on the internet.

Meat

Here’s the correct version, as published in Omni, 1990. "They're made out of meat. " "Meat? " "Meat. They're made out of meat. " "There's no doubt about it. "That's impossible. "They use the radio waves to talk, but the signals don't come from them. "So who made the machines? "They made the machines. "That's ridiculous. "I'm not asking you, I'm telling you. "Maybe they're like the orfolei. "Nope. "Spare me. "Nope. "No brain? " "Oh, there's a brain all right. "So ... what does the thinking? " "You're not understanding, are you? "Thinking meat! "Yes, thinking meat! "Omigod. "Thank you. "Omigod. "First it wants to talk to us. "We're supposed to talk to meat. " "That's the idea. "They actually do talk, then. "I thought you just told me they used radio.

" "They do, but what do you think is on the radio? "Omigod. "Officially or unofficially? " "Both. " "I was hoping you would say that. " "It seems harsh, but there is a limit. "I agree one hundred percent. 10 great science fiction novels that have been banned. @djscruffy: And that's why you're a heathen and should be burned at the stake.

10 great science fiction novels that have been banned

@djscruffy: In defense of public schools, I would suggest that the reason many of these books are challenged so often is that they're frequently included in school curriculums and libraries. I grew up in a state that, according to these links, engaged in book-burning less than a decade before my birth. That makes me shudder. But I'm also the child of a public school teacher and am familiar with my mother's and many of her peers' views on children's reading materials. Despite the generally conservative views in my community, my elementary school encouraged me to read A Wrinkle in Time and The Giver and Are You There God, It's Me, Margaret.

I suppose I've wandered a bit. @djscruffy: To be fair, it's not usually the schools that want to ban the books, but the few overprotective parents who make wild assumptions about the books we try to teach.