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Photography. Are You a Synthesizer? (click above for larger image) So let’s say you are a planner.

Are You a Synthesizer?

You’re probably looking up at the visual and thinking to yourself—"yup, I do a lot of that”. Or maybe you’re a designer (or design strategist) and you might be thinking the same thing. Or you could be a business analyst or brand strategist and think “yeah, I do that”. Maybe you are an interaction designer, writer, information architect or creative director and feeling the same way.

Could it be that you are a human “synthesizer”? I believe that the more options technology gives us—the more complexity, and potential—then the more important it becomes to hone in that core set of "truths" AND be able to articulate them to a diverse set of project influencers. I believe that these soft skills are needed now more than ever because design, technology, business, brand and human needs have never been so intertwined before—so co-dependent.

Synthesizer does not = job title. Let’s be clear. 1. The Online Tool for Precision Bitmap to Vector Con. Inside Architecture : Understanding the root causes of poor sof. If I had a nickel for every time I've heard a developer complain about poor quality requirements, I'd... well... have a lot of nickels.

Inside Architecture : Understanding the root causes of poor sof

Let's look, for a moment, at the root causes of poor requirements and business rules. While I consider this to be a business problem, and not a technology problem per se', I'll use root cause analysis (discussed in a prior post) to organize the analysis. The problem, as perceived by developers, can be quoted this way: Problem Statement: The requirements for software, as delivered by typical business analysts, is not sufficiently clear, insightful, or well understood to develop software systems that meet the needs of business users.

There is an assumption here. Assumption: Improving the quality of software requirements will have a net positive effect on the quality, reliability, applicability, usability, and value of custom software as perceived by the business users who use it. Interesting assumption, that one. How to read this analysis: The User Experience of Enterprise Software Matters. Column by Paul J.

The User Experience of Enterprise Software Matters

Sherman Published: December 15, 2008 “As important as the user experience of enterprise software is to a business’s success, why isn’t its assessment usually a factor in technology selection?” Over the past twenty years, the field of user experience has been fortunate. Software and hardware product organizations increasingly have adopted user-centered design methods such as contextual user research, usability testing, and iterative interaction design. However, there’s one area that I believe has lagged behind: the enterprise software space. Just as the mass market has demanded and is receiving more usable products, so should businesses demand that their technology vendors make their software easier to learn, more efficient to use, and easy to remember. Consider this column a call to action to organizations that buy enterprise-level software.

Your technology selection processes are incomplete. Enterprise Software “Enterprise software products are complex, powerful tools. Inside Architecture : The bizarre assumption of functional decom. Hi pr, You are asking valuable questions.

Inside Architecture : The bizarre assumption of functional decom

I'm glad to be discussing this point with you, because I think other folks feel like you do. Here is the core question that I'm hearing you ask: What is the business value of elegance? Before I answer, I want you to think about the things that you use in your life. Do you drive a car? When you go to a store to purchase a new shirt, what do you look for? What is the most popular feature on the new Google telephone... is it the weight? The car you drive, the shirt you wear, the phone you carry... they all reflect you. If your business customer is writing a check to your IT group for $80,000 USD for a software solution (or $800,000, or $8,000,000), don't you think that they are aware of that money?

I've had business customers who loved my product because they could choose a background photo that sat right behind the data entry fields. The point is that we do more than deliver a technical solution. ShapeShop.