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10 Psychological Experiments That Went Horribly Wrong. Psychology as we know it is a relatively young science, but since its inception it has helped us to gain a greater understanding of ourselves and our interactions with the world.

10 Psychological Experiments That Went Horribly Wrong

Many psychological experiments have been valid and ethical, allowing researchers to make new treatments and therapies available, and giving other insights into our motivations and actions. Sadly, others have ended up backfiring horribly — ruining lives and shaming the profession. Here are ten psychological experiments that spiraled out of control. 10. Stanford Prison Experiment Prisoners and guards.

Spy Gear.


Hidden Fingerprint of Weapons-Grade Plutonium Finally Found. After 50 years of searching, physicists have spotted the fingerprint of radioactive plutonium, revealing the secrets of this complex molecule behind nuclear weapons.

Hidden Fingerprint of Weapons-Grade Plutonium Finally Found

The researchers found the "plutonium signal" using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which is often used to peer into the electronic structure of atoms and molecules. Their findings, detailed in the May 18 issue of the journal Science, could help scientists and others figure out the relative amounts of different types of plutonium (and its many compounds) in nuclear reactors, for instance. "When someone has a nuclear reactor, with plutonium sitting there for a long time, you don't really know how much is in there," said study researcher Georgios Koutroulakis of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

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LED Lights Make Augmented Vision a Reality. LED Lights Make Augmented Vision a Reality Okay, this is just freaky.

LED Lights Make Augmented Vision a Reality

We know LED lights are versatile enough to be used for practically anything, but LED contact lenses? Really?! Yes, as it turns out, really. University of Washington researchers have figured out how to implant semitransparent red and blue LED lights in contact lenses, for the purpose of receiving and displaying data in sharp visual images and video. Once miniature green LEDs are developed (and they’re in the works, as of now), full color displays will be possible.

Lead researcher Babak Parvis comments “You won’t necessarily have to shift your focus to see the image generated by the contact lens,” it would just appear in front of you and your view of the real world will be completely unobstructed when the display is turned off. Ah, the real world. Thanks to Extreme Tech for the quote and Trendhunter for the images. Gadgets. Koalas to the Max dot Com.


Earth. Newly discovered Mayan calendar goes way past 2012. Newly discovered wall writings found in Guatemala show the famed Maya culture's obsession with cycles of time.

Newly discovered Mayan calendar goes way past 2012

But they also show calendars that go well beyond 2012, the year when the vanished civilization, according to popular culture, expected the end of the world. "So much for the supposed end of the world," says archaeologist William Saturno of Boston University, lead author of a study in the journal Science, which reported the discovery on Thursday. Discovered in the ruins of Xultun (SHOOL-toon) , the astronomical calendar was unearthed from a filled-in scribe's room. While about 7 million Maya people still live in Central America today, the "Classic" Maya civilization of pyramid temples had collapsed there by about 900 A.D., leaving only a few birch-bark books dating to perhaps the 14th century as records of their astronomy, until now.

CBBC Newsround - 'Ghost town' being built in US to test new technologies. Nikola Tesla - The Forgotten Wizard. 12.08.2009 - Social scientists build case for 'survival of the kindest'. By Yasmin Anwar, Media Relations | 08 December 2009 BERKELEY — Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, are challenging long-held beliefs that human beings are wired to be selfish.

12.08.2009 - Social scientists build case for 'survival of the kindest'

In a wide range of studies, social scientists are amassing a growing body of evidence to show we are evolving to become more compassionate and collaborative in our quest to survive and thrive. (Photo illustration by Jonathan Payne) In contrast to "every man for himself" interpretations of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, Dacher Keltner, a UC Berkeley psychologist and author of "Born to be Good: The Science of a Meaningful Life," and his fellow social scientists are building the case that humans are successful as a species precisely because of our nurturing, altruistic and compassionate traits.


Android integration comes to your car's mirror [w/video] Scope.swf (application/x-shockwave-flash Object) Computers. Intermission: The Robots Can Now Fly and Juggle at the Same Time - Technology. Glow-in-the-dark mushroom rediscovered after 170 years. It's something you would never expect to go missing, but one of the world's brightest glow-in-the-dark mushrooms has been rediscovered after an absence of more than 170 years, according to USA Today.

The bioluminescent shrooms had become a Brazilian legend of sorts. They were first spied in 1840 by an English botanist named George Gardner, who was alarmed after he saw some boys playing with a glowing object in the streets of Vila de Natividad, a village in the Goiás state in central Brazil. After that, no more sightings of the brightly glowing fungus had ever been reported. The mushroom was nearly forgotten until 2002, when Brazilian chemist Cassius Stevani came across Gardner's early reports. Then, in 2005, a breakthrough occurred. Izar and Fragaszy scooped up specimens and contacted Stevani, who later confirmed that the mushrooms were indeed Gardner's long lost species.