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Medieval Codes : 25 best from the Luttrell Psalter. Thanks for waiting, and here it is: another compilation of weird medieval manuscript images from Medieval Codes researcher Courtney Tuck.

Medieval Codes : 25 best from the Luttrell Psalter

The Luttrell Psalter (London, British Library MS Additional 42130) was created for Sir Geoffrey Luttrell, the lord of Irnham in Lincolnshire, England. It has been dated to 1276-1345 and it is currently housed in the British Library, which has digitized it for online access. Sir Geoffrey and his family are depicted within the Psalter’s pages, as well as scenes of daily life. Those, however, are only some of the intriguing and entertaining marginal illustrations found in the Luttrell Psalter.

As I had previously created a top ten most memorable marginal illuminations from the Macclesfield Psalter for an earlier blog post, I attempted to do the same for the Luttrell. 25 - This horse/human/bat hybrid is standing in a saucy contrapposto position. 24 - This disembodied head is devouring one creature as vines sprout from its ears. 10 - Pew! And finally . . . 9 Principles of Japanese Art and Culture. There are 9 basic principles that underlie Japanese art and culture.

9 Principles of Japanese Art and Culture

They're called aesthetics — concepts that answer the question: what is art? There are 9 Japanese aesthetics. They are the basis for Japanese art, fashion, pop culture, music and movies. 1. Wabi-sabi (imperfect) Can you imagine if all the characters in movies were perfect? 2. Miyabi is often translated "heartbreaker". 3.

Shibui means simple, subtle or unobtrusive. 4. Iki is uniqueness. Iki is the movie character who's a bad-ass with style and grace. 5. RockArt from the Dreamtime. Wandjinas, the other rock art style for which the Kimberley has long been famous, were first recorded by the explorer George Grey in the Kimberley in 1837 .

RockArt from the Dreamtime.

These Wandjina sites are found in the Glenelg River area. At least 4,000 years old, it is a living art form representing ancestral beings originating in the sea and the sky. Images of Wandjina are characterised by halo-like headdresses and mouthless faces with large round eyes, fringed with eyelashes, set either side of an ovate nose The large scale, and solid or static appearance of the Wandjina art contrasts with the Bradshaw/ Gwion art, with its more delicate images of a usually smaller scale, and its less tangible connection with contemporary indigenous culture. Bigge Island rock art – Kimberley WA Kimberly rock art painting – Wandjina Wandjina rock-art at Raft Point in the Kimberley Raft Point Wandjina rock art. Oh my visage. Oh my visage In March 2008, BibliOdyssey unearthed and did thee definitive overview of the Ningyo-Do Bunko database, which features thousands of "late 19th/early 20th century watercolor sketches of toy designs.

Oh my visage

" Very much a Johnny-come-lately to this material and in an insomniac delirium, I dug through the database and found so many faces staring back at me. Here are eleven of them. Also see BibliOdyssey's 2007 post of Japanese toy designs from another database. These two appear to show masks from China. Silversmithing & Metalwork.

Fabricswallpapercarpets screens

WABI SABI Scandinavia - Design, Art and DIY. Free City. Fredericks & Mae Bow — COMING SOON. A bow is a flexible piece of material which shoots aerodynamic projectiles called arrows.

Fredericks & Mae Bow — COMING SOON

A string joins the two ends and when the string is drawn back, the ends of the stick are flexed. The oldest bows in one piece are the elm Holmegaard bows found in Denmark, which were dated to 9,000 BCE. Fredericks & Mae is the art/design team of Jolie Mae Signorile and Gabriel Fredericks Cohen. The two met through a shared love for materials - Fredericks & Mae started in the piles of feathers, thread, gold and paper that decorated their first studio in 2007. Their collaborative practice has since evolved into a series of objects for the home, garden and sky. Japanese graphic design from the 1920s-30s. In the 1920s and 1930s, Japan embraced new forms of graphic design as waves of social change swept across the nation.

Japanese graphic design from the 1920s-30s

This collection of 50 posters, magazine covers and advertisements offer a glimpse at some of the prevailing tendencies in a society transformed by the growth of modern industry and technology, the popularity of Western art and culture, and the emergence of leftist political thought. "Buy Domestic! " poster, 1930 [+] Cover of "Nippon" magazine issue #1, Oct 1934 [+] "Fuji Weekly" cover, Oct 1930 [+] Poster for Japan's first national census, 1920 [+] // "Health for body and country" poster, c. 1930 [+] Grand Nagoya Festival poster by Kenkichi Sugimoto, 1933 [+] Kyoto Grand Exposition to Commemorate the Showa Imperial Coronation, 1928 [+] Poster design by Shujiro Shimomura, 1928 [+] "NAPF" (Nippona Artista Proleta Federacio) magazine cover, Feb 1931 [+] "NAPF" (Nippona Artista Proleta Federacio) magazine covers: Sep 1931 // Oct 1931 "May 1" movie poster by Hiromu Hara, 1928-1929 [+]