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10 Apps To Aid Pupil Revision. Reading Time: 3 minutes How can we help students prepare for their exams?

10 Apps To Aid Pupil Revision

Teaching and support staff in our schools will be working very hard to create amazing resources to support pupils. During this busy time of year, apps can come to the rescue for busy teachers and help reduce the stress of planning in order to improve pupils’ grades. Here are 10 apps to consider: 1. gojimo.com This can be accessed via PC or the app downloaded on to tablets. 2. socrative.com This allows teachers to create simple quizzes that students can take quickly on laptops or via classroom tablet computers or their own smartphones. 3. quizlet.com/live. Retrieval Practice For Revision. Reading Time: 3 minutes How can we support students in their revision?

Retrieval Practice For Revision

Retrieval practice is defined by Mark Enser as ‘retrieving something from our memories to make it easier to recall in future.’ If using it makes recall easier, surely this is a big win for learning and the progress of our students. It has had a lot of press recently and is cited by The Learning Scientists as the most effective study method according to much solid research. Proof it’s important, then, if we perceive learning as something entering long-term memory. Www.retrievalpractice.org helpfully offers this explanation of retrieval: ‘looking back and pulling information out of your head.’ Top 10 Revision Apps For Students.

Reading Time: 3 minutes.

Top 10 Revision Apps For Students

How can you help your students revise? Revising isn’t easy. So, how can you help your students to become a ‘study ninja’? Revision apps can help students with organisation, investigation and memory. Take a look below at out top-10 suggestions. Study Ninja. Having Your Smartphone Nearby Takes a Toll on Your Thinking (Even When It’s Silent and Facedown) Test Anxiety: Crash Course Study Skills #8. Tips for the 9-1 MFL GCSE Speaking, Reading and Writing Exams – ‘Homestraight’ Part 2. This month we’re delighted to be welcoming back David Shanks with his second post about preparing for GCSE 9-1.

Tips for the 9-1 MFL GCSE Speaking, Reading and Writing Exams – ‘Homestraight’ Part 2

Have an effective and organised general approach Measuring what works in education is a notoriously tricky business with so many variables acting upon the learning process. However, advances in the world of cognitive science and educational research are indicating firmly that spaced repetition, retrieval practice, interleaving, elaboration and worked examples are some of the main strategies that have been shown to be effective in improving the teaching and learning cycle. The excellent Learning Scientists website concisely summarises such research-backed strategies and even provides them in visual, student friendly language, as well as in other languages.

Share these strategies explicitly with your students and incorporate them into your planning and teaching in the final run-up to the exams. BBC Bitesize - Exams: how to believe in yourself. BBC Bitesize - Top 7 exam day tips. BBC Bitesize - Revision: timetables and planning. BBC Bitesize - Revision: mind map essentials.

BBC Bitesize - Revision: how to use past exam papers. BBC Bitesize - Revision: memory hacks and tips. Stress handout for teenagers. √√EXAM PLAN. TipsEXAMS. Coping with exams - tips for wellbeing and performance. It’s that time of year again, as some of you need no reminding. There are schools with stressful, shouty posters saying 20 DAYS TO GCSEs, which is really hardly necessary – and, in my opinion, could well be detrimental. Most students’ stress levels are perfectly high enough. Post-it notes, iPhones and other memory aids.

During exam season, attention is focused on how to register facts, ideas or techniques in students’ memories, and how to get them to recall the ideas or techniques from this mysterious store.

Post-it notes, iPhones and other memory aids

In preparation for last summer’s exams I tried an approach using Post-it notes. As we work through past papers, when facts or techniques are needed we add a Post-it note to the Campaign Wall. Simply sticking the note on the wall is kinaesthetic, as is rearranging them (the adhesive is very forgiving) into topic areas, or into I KNOW and I DON’T KNOW lists.

For some students this act can help them recall a fact from the position it was placed, or even from something unexpected such as the note falling to the floor and having to be picked up. When we look at other exam papers subsequently and a fact or technique is required, rather than just repeating it we tear the note from the wall and place it on the desk next to the exam paper. There is probably not much new here. Campaign wall screen example. Memory techniques and exam success. I am able to commit a huge amount of information to memory in a very short space of time.

Memory techniques and exam success

I can memorise the order of a shuffled deck of playing cards in less than 2 minutes, a list of 240 random words within a 15-minute time limit and, given an hour, I can memorise the precise sequence of well over 1000 randomly generated digits. I can recall all of this perfectly, no delay, no errors. Many people dismiss this as being largely inaccessible for all but the most dedicated of competitive memorisers but the reality is quite different. The ability to perform these feats is based on the application of simple techniques that have been in use for millennia. Memory Palaces – What they are and how to use them. In a previous blog post I outlined a very basic memory technique which works by creating a story out of to-be-remembered information.

Memory Palaces – What they are and how to use them

This makes the information more memorable than recalling a list of unrelated words and the technique itself requires no real groundwork, after all, you are just making up a story. Whilst impressive results can be obtained by using the story method, it is limited in scope and it is only when you delve a little deeper that memory techniques truly come into their own, enabling students to make a real difference to their exam preparation. The most popular of these more advanced methods is the so-called “memory palace”, popularised by BBC’s Sherlock – albeit in a slightly misleading way. In this post my goal is to convey a sense of what a memory palace really is and how students can use it to great effect. In simple terms, a traditional memory palace is a building that you know very well indeed. There is someone with serious health problems at your front door. Revision technique ideas. Over the past few weeks my GCSE and A Level students have had their mock exams which has inevitably meant a number of revision lessons.

Revision technique ideas

I don’t know about you, but I find that it gets difficult to think of new and engaging ideas as the lessons continue and students learn in different ways, so here are some of the revision techniques that I have used with my classes. Mind palaces The New Year’s Day special of Sherlock on BBC 1 showed his use of mind palaces, a mnemonic device where a familiar setting is used to remember key details. Effective Revision. For the first few years of my teaching career, I would set revision lessons without much expectation.

Effective Revision

If you were going to do a test, you should at least give some chance of success by providing the lesson before for ‘revision’. I would often provide a list of suggested activities that students could pick from: posters, mindmaps, crosswords, flashcards, highlighting. In the mid-2000s, I may have even suggested students pick something that matched their preferred Learning Style: visual (comic), auditory (write a rap) or kinesthetic (act it out). I now know these were all lessons of totally wasted opportunities for learning. On 7 September 2013, I attended the first ever ResearchEd inspired by some of the people I followed on Twitter. The Mallinson Library, Wellington College. Revision and exam preparation in the run up to external exams.

The Mallinson Library, Wellington College

Here is some excellent advice from Mr Morris, Head of Wellbeing: We are in the midst of a busy, exciting and challenging period as you prepare to complete your courses. Exam Prep Toolkit: Literature part 2. Our regular blog author, Jill Carter, has prepared some revision tips and advice for your students – pass it on! You have two English Literature exams so get clear about what each of these requires. Exam Prep Toolkit: Literature part 1. Our regular blog author, Jill Carter, has prepared some revision tips and advice for your students – pass it on! You have two English Literature exams so get clear about what each of these requires. Look for patterns so you can prepare more effectively for both. For both exams, you will need to be able to show that you know your texts well and that you can read critically.

I will be looking at these skills more closely now. English Language: Exam Prep Writing toolkit. Our regular blog author, Jill Carter, has prepared some revision tips and advice for your students – pass it on! You have two English Language exams so get clear about what each of these requires. Look for patterns so you can prepare more effectively for both. For both exams, you will need to be able to read critically. You will need to be able to analyse fiction and non-fiction texts. Don’t forget, there are many similarities. English Language: Exam Prep Reading Toolkit.