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Darrell Issa: Wiretaps reveal Holder and DOJ knew about gunwalking. By The Right Scoop Issa says that he has now seen the wiretap documents and while he can’t reveal what was in the classified documents, they prove that Holder and his crew knew about the gunwalking: About The Right Scoop Blogger extraordinaire since 2009 and the owner and Chief Blogging Officer of the most wonderful and super fantastic blog in the known and unknown universe: The Right Scoop NOTE: If the comments don't load properly or they are difficult to read because they are on the blue background, please use the button below to RELOAD DISQUS.

Darrell Issa: Wiretaps reveal Holder and DOJ knew about gunwalking

Facebook, FBI, US govt. tracking and spying on you 2012. Privacy Class Action Under Federal Wiretap Act Targets Facebook - Free Complaint Download. Privacy and Security Fanatic: FBI Creates Surveillance Unit to Build Backdoors into the Web. The FBI still claims it is going dark and its monitoring abilities could be rendered ineffective without surveillance backdoors built into communications, according to FBI Director Robert Mueller's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Privacy and Security Fanatic: FBI Creates Surveillance Unit to Build Backdoors into the Web

In fact, the feds plowed ahead with their plans that date back to at least 2008 by forming a new electronic communications surveillance unit to be housed in the National Domestic Communications Assistance Center (NDCAC) in Quantico. "Congress included $8,244,000 and 13 positions for the FBI to establish and operate a NDCAC," the FBI reported. But the expansion of eavesdropping capabilities concerns all of us, including people who use VPNs for privacy or security, or both. Should the FBI Be Allowed to Wiretap Facebook? We may all be getting a new Facebook friend soon: the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Should the FBI Be Allowed to Wiretap Facebook?

The FBI wants to shift its wiretapping from old-school telephone lines to person-to-person platforms like email and instant messaging and even social media like Facebook. To help it make the switch, the FBI is asking Congress to require tech companies to rewrite their software so it has a “back door” that the FBI can use to listen in. It is all part of an initiative known as “Going Dark.” The FBI says that its ability to follow suspected criminals is eroding – or “going dark”—as people communicate more online and that it needs new powers to help it track down drug dealers, sex traffickers, and terrorists.

But “Going Dark” has – not surprisingly – set off a major privacy battle, even though the FBI would still need to get court approval to place a wiretap. CIA, FBI, NSA, differents agencies for an unique intent…global monitoring. We have discussed several times regarding the intention of the FBI to create a special unit for internet monitoring and surveillance, a task force established to prevent and fight cyber crimes .In reality the Bureau already has different internal units that work with the same purpose and in the last years has promoted different projects for the development of tools and applications for the web monitoring.

CIA, FBI, NSA, differents agencies for an unique intent…global monitoring

The FBI has recently created a secret surveillance unit to project and develop technologic tools and software for Internet and wireless communications monitoring. FBI is considered one of the most active agencies in this sense, in the last months it has publicly requested the design of a real time monitor for social networks that have to be able to identify suspect behaviors that could be interpreted as indicator of presence for an ongoing crime. UPDATE 2-First wiretap played at Gupta insider-trading trial. Preserving Cabrini-Green's images In the sharp sun of an April afternoon, Nate Lanthrum walks through the remains of Cabrini-Green giving away what he has taken.

UPDATE 2-First wiretap played at Gupta insider-trading trial

He looks out of place, a white guy carrying a $1,500 Nikon D700 camera, but the residents are used to him by now and greet... Blackhawks thrilled to have Brent Seabrook back. Under the U.S. Supreme Court: Spying on the American public. US Federal Bureau of Investigation Forum. Bugged.com Is the Best in Bug Detection. Pinellas Park, FL -- (SBWIRE) -- 05/04/2012 -- Wiretaps and bugs aren’t just something seen in the movies any more.

Bugged.com Is the Best in Bug Detection

With advances in technology, people and businesses are using these devices to listen in on phone conversations for a variety of reasons, including learning business secrets and attempting to catch a cheating spouse or significant other. Bugged.com boasts itself as the first and oldest Internet store that sells products for bug and wiretap detection, as well as offering technical counter surveillance measures, or TCSM. If a company or individual believes they may be dealing with wiretapping or bug issues, Bugged.com offers nationwide services to help detect these issues before they become a problem. In fact, they have found more bugs and wiretaps than any other company around the world that specializes in this area. That is an incredible accomplishment! FBI Wants Wiretap-Ready Social Networks Soon [VIDEO] – Know All That!

The Federal Bureau of Investigation wants to make Facebook and other social networks easier to use for spying on suspected criminals — and it wants access ASAP.

FBI Wants Wiretap-Ready Social Networks Soon [VIDEO] – Know All That!

High-ranking FBI officials and other government representatives have been meeting with Internet industry leaders to ask them not to oppose a proposed law that would give federal agencies backdoor access to social networking sites, CNET reports. The FBI’s argument? As communication has shifted more and more online, previous laws allowing wiretaps on phone lines are becoming less and less useful. FBI lawyers have reportedly drafted a proposal that if passed into law would require social networking sites to rework their code for easier surveillance. It would also apply to instant messaging, VoIP and email providers that exceed a certain number of users.

FBI Looks to have Websites Wiretap Ready « Ironpaper: Current. The FBI is pushing a plan to force surveillance backdoors on social networks, VoIP, and e-mail providers.

FBI Looks to have Websites Wiretap Ready « Ironpaper: Current

The FBI is asking Internet companies not to oppose a laws designed to make it easier to do so. FBI officials claim that the Internet has made it more difficult for agents to wiretap Americans suspected of illegal activities. The FBI has drafted a proposed law that require these alter their code to ensure their products are wiretap-friendly. “If you create a service, product, or app that allows a user to communicate, you get the privilege of adding that extra coding,” an industry representative who has reviewed the FBI’s draft legislation. FBI asking Internet Companies for Wiretap-Friendly Back Door.

The push to make the internet a controlled space used to spy on citizens, where supposedly “private” information is automatically shared with authorities, might soon reach another threshold.

FBI asking Internet Companies for Wiretap-Friendly Back Door

A new report suggests that the FBI is currently discussing with major internet companies such as Microsoft, Facebook, Yahoo and Google to build backdoor accesses to their services to facilitate government surveillance. The FBI is also attempting to convince these companies to support an upcoming law that would allow the outright spying of social networks, VoIP, and Web e-mail providers.

Report: FBI Seeking More Wiretap-Friendly Internet Code. The FBI wants legislation that would require Internet companies to build backdoors into their communication technologies that would allow government surveillance, CNET reports.

Report: FBI Seeking More Wiretap-Friendly Internet Code

White House, Senate and FBI representatives held a meeting discussing technological shifts in communication that make it difficult for investigators to conduct wiretapping and other “going dark” surveillance practices. Proposed legislation would require social networking sites, instant messaging, voice-over Internet Protocol and email services to redesign their code in order to be more wiretap-friendly, the report said. An amended Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act would include Web companies in addition to broadband networks and telecommunications providers, which are already included under CALEA. FBI Proposes Expansion of Wiretap Law. [Video] FBI Wants Wiretap-Ready Social Networks Soon. The Federal Bureau of Investigation wants to make Facebook and other social networks easier to use for spying on suspected criminals — and it wants access ASAP. High-ranking FBI officials and other government representatives have been meeting with Internet industry leaders to ask them not to oppose a proposed law that would give federal agencies backdoor access to social networking sites, CNET reports.

The FBI ’s argument? As communication has shifted more and more online, previous laws allowing wiretaps on phone lines are becoming less and less useful. FBI Wants Wiretap Ready Websites. The FBI is asking Internet companies not to oppose a controversial proposal that would require firms, including Microsoft, Facebook, Yahoo, and Google, to build in backdoors for government surveillance. That's according to a story being reported by CNET, a technology news website.

FBI officials said the communication from the telephone system to the Internet has made it far more difficult for agents to wiretap Americans suspected of illegal activities, according to CNET. The FBI general counsel's office has drafted a proposed law that the bureau claims is the best solution: requiring that social-networking Web sites and providers of VoIP, instant messaging, and Web e-mail alter their code to ensure their products are wiretap-friendly. FBI Wants to Read Facebook, Gmail, Skype Messages, and More. This article has nothing to do with genealogy. However, I do believe every American should read this, or similar, articles. I admit to being a bit of a privacy nut, but this proposal really bothers me. What do you think? FBI Pushes for Wiretap Access to Social Media Sites. ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE The FBI wants a new backdoor to the Internet. CNET reports the bureau is proposing legislation that would require social networks and other Internet companies to allow wiretapping.

Under the proposal, companies like Google, Microsoft and Facebook would have to make their online services more accessible to the FBI, so it can monitor and record conversations when legally permitted to do so. Companies would have to provide the bureau with decryption tools to make sense of the information it captures.