Classroom Management

Facebook Twitter

Powerful Words: Read It (30 Photos) Academic lists - Templates. Parts may come and go! Besides using the "Rockin' Behavior" chart in our classroom, which is individual behavior, we are also using Mr.

Parts may come and go!

Potato head as a whole group behavior incentive. When the class is caught being good or behaving appropriately as a whole, we allow a student to add a Potato Head body part. Once Mr. Potato Head is completely together, we have a celebration. We finally got him put together a week or so ago and the kids got to have an ice cream party. Born to Learn ~ You are Born to Learn. KidRex - Kid Safe Search Engine. TeacherTube - Teach the World. 10 Great Classroom Icebreakers. 1.

10 Great Classroom Icebreakers

Self-Portrait. Have your students draw themselves. After they have done this, collect the papers and hang them up for the whole class to see. Now have students try to guess who the artists was for each picture. 2. At the beginning of the year, write a short letter about yourself as the teacher. 3. Give each student an index card. 4. Have the students get into a circle. 5. Pass around a sheet of paper and some pens. Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class. The following is a guest post from Michelle Doman, a 7th and 8th grade Language Arts teacher at Brandon Middle School in Wisconsin.

Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class

Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class Many people get a little squeamish, wiggly, and offer a scrunched expression when I respond to the question, “What grades do you teach?” I teach middle school, and with heart and honesty, I find great joys (and challenges) in teaching the group referred to as “tweens” and adolescents. So, I invite you into the quirky world of middle school. Do not fear…you will become comfortable in a beanbag, find a new young-at-heart-love-for reading air, and (at times chuckle) as I give you a sneak-peek into the crevices (oh, look out for that dirty sock) of the teenage minds. Here are the Top 10 Ways to Wake-up Students in Class... A Model of Learning Objectives. A statement of a learning objective contains a verb (an action) and an object (usually a noun).

A Model of Learning Objectives

The verb generally refers to [actions associated with] the intended cognitive process. The object generally describes the knowledge students are expected to acquire or construct. (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 4–5) The cognitive process dimension represents a continuum of increasing cognitive complexity—from remember to create. Anderson and Krathwohl identify 19 specific cognitive processes that further clarify the bounds of the six categories (Table 1). (Table 1 adapted from Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 67–68.) The knowledge dimension represents a range from concrete (factual) to abstract (metacognitive) (Table 2). (Table 2 adapted from Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, p. 46.).

Recommended resources Bloom et al.' Bloom's Taxonomy - An Overview and Bloom's Taxonomy - Designing Activities (Colorado Community College System Faculty Wiki) Revising Bloom's Taxonomy. *Anderson, L.W. Classroom Architect.