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Description of the SDG and the SDG in an Australian context

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Improved water source (% of population with access) Home National Water Initiative - Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. ​​The National Water Initiative (NWI), agreed in 2004 by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), is the national blueprint for water reform.

Home National Water Initiative - Department of Agriculture and Water Resources

See Intergovernmental agreement on a National Water Initiative (PDF 348 KB) Building on the 1994 COAG Water Reform Framework, the NWI is a shared commitment by governments to increase the efficiency of Australia's water use, leading to greater certainty for investment and productivity, for rural and urban communities and for the environment. Under the NWI, governments have made commitments to: prepare comprehensive water plansachieve sustainable water use in over-allocated or stressed water systemsintroduce registers of water rights and standards for water accountingexpand trade in water rightsimprove pricing for water storage and deliverybetter manage urban water demands.

Water in Australia 2013-14 summary: Water Information: Bureau of Meteorology. Water in Australia provides a country wide picture of water availability and use in a particular financial year.

Water in Australia 2013-14 summary: Water Information: Bureau of Meteorology

It addresses: Water in Australia builds on the former biennial Australian Water Resource Assessment and the annual National Water Account summary. It’s a fallacy that all Australians have access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene. Nations are gathering in New York this week to discuss the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which aim to improve health, wealth and well-being for countries both rich and poor.

It’s a fallacy that all Australians have access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene

As a developed nation, it might be assumed that Australia will easily meet these new goals at home – including goal number 6, to ensure “availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all”. But the unpalatable truth is that many Australians still lack access to clean water and effective sanitation. The World Bank’s Development Indicators list Australia as having 100% access to clean water and effective sanitation. 2012. Goal 6: Clean Water & Sanitation. <a id="mobile-version-link" class="mobile-version-link" href=" the mobile version of globalgoals.org</a> Targets.

Goal 6: Clean Water & Sanitation

Access to clean water and sanitation around the world – mapped. Around the world, 946 million people still go to the toilet outside.

Access to clean water and sanitation around the world – mapped

Eritrea is top of the list, with 77% of its population practising open defecation, a practice which can lead to the contamination of drinking water sources, and the spread of diseases such as cholera, diarrhoea, dysentry, hepatitis A and typhoid. A huge global effort has been focused on reducing these numbers and new data from the WHO/Unicef Joint Monitoring Programme, which has measured the progress made on access to drinking water and sanitation since 1990, shows that there have been improvements in certain areas. 4613.0 - Australia's Environment: Issues and Trends, 2006. Drinking water quality in Australia is high by world standards, considering that globally more than one billion people still do not have access to safe drinking water.

4613.0 - Australia's Environment: Issues and Trends, 2006

In Australia, 93% of households were connected to mains/town water in March 2004. Almost all households (98%) in capital cities were connected, compared with 85% of households outside of capital cities. This discrepancy was largest in Tasmania, where 96% of households in Hobart were connected to mains/town water, compared with 77% for the rest of the state. Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin : Environmental health challenges in remote Aboriginal Australian communities: clean air, clean water and safe housing. Environmental health challenges in remote Aboriginal Australian communities: clean air, clean water and safe housing Holly D.

Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin : Environmental health challenges in remote Aboriginal Australian communities: clean air, clean water and safe housing

Clifford1*, Glenn Pearson1, Peter Franklin1,2, Roz Walker1, Graeme R. Zosky3 Environmental health challenges in remote Aboriginal Australian communities: clean air, clean water and safe housing. Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin 15(2). Water and Sanitation - United Nations Sustainable Development. Water and SanitationFlorencia Soto Nino2016-08-17T17:54:39+00:00 Share this story, choose your platform!

Water and Sanitation - United Nations Sustainable Development

Clean, accessible water for all is an essential part of the world we want to live in. There is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this. But due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, every year millions of people, most of them children, die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene. Water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation negatively impact food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world.

The Sustainable Development Goals Explained: Clean Water and Sanitation.