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Wisconsin Historical Society. Veteran of Civil War | Newspaper Article/Clipping | Wisconsin Historical Society Newspaper Article/Clipping Wisconsin Local History & Biography Articles Headline: Veteran of Civil War Main Heading: Civil War Sub Heading: Biography.

Wisconsin Historical Society

Further in regard to col. paine of the 4th wisconsin. A shameful history--further in regard to col. paine of the 4th wisconsin | Newspaper Article/Clipping | Wisconsin Historical Society Newspaper Article/Clipping Wisconsin Local History & Biography Articles.

further in regard to col. paine of the 4th wisconsin

Youngest vet of Civil War tells of meeting "Old Abe" at capital during sixties. Youngest vet of Civil War tells of meeting "Old Abe" at capital during sixties | Newspaper Article/Clipping | Wisconsin Historical Society Newspaper Article/Clipping Wisconsin Local History & Biography Articles.

Youngest vet of Civil War tells of meeting "Old Abe" at capital during sixties

The Iron Brigade (all notes) The Iron Brigade - Essential Civil War Curriculum. The Iron Brigade was one of the most celebrated military organizations of the American Civil War.

The Iron Brigade - Essential Civil War Curriculum

Composed originally of the 2nd, 6th and 7th Wisconsin and 19th Indiana Volunteer Infantry regiments, it was reinforced after Antietam in October 1862 by the 24th Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Battery B of the 4th U.S. Artillery was also attached to the brigade for much of the war and volunteers from the infantry regiments were selected and trained to serve the battery. In the first weeks at Washington in 1861, the provisional brigade included the 5th Wisconsin and Governor Alexander Williams Randall of Wisconsin had hoped to form an all-Wisconsin unit. Military History - Civil War. In 1861, Wisconsin was thirteen years old and had a population of a little over 775,000.

Military History - Civil War

Over the course of the next four years, the Badger State grew up in a hurry, sending over 91,000 men (eleven percent of the population) to fight in the Civil War. They organized at thirteen training camps around the state into fifty-three infantry regiments, four cavalry regiments, one heavy artillery regiment, and thirteen light artillery batteries. The Iron Brigade, Old Abe and Military Affairs. Between 1860 and 1861, eleven Southern states defied the authority of the U.S. government and seceded from the Union, asserting a doctrine of states' rights.

The Iron Brigade, Old Abe and Military Affairs

Ironically though, for several years before the war, Wisconsin had been the most thoroughgoing champion of states' rights. Unlike the Southern states, however, Wisconsin had used the doctrine in opposition to, rather than in support of, slavery. States' rights had been the basis of the Wisconsin Supreme Court's decision to nullify the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act after the controversy surrounding the fugitive slave Joshua Glover (see "Abolitionism and Other Social Reforms"). Wisconsin Civil War History and the Iron Brigade. Wisconsin soldiers fought in every major battle of the Civil War.

Wisconsin Civil War History and the Iron Brigade

Many of Wisconsin's regiments were composed primarily of single ethnic groups. For example, the 9th, 26th, and 45th were mainly Germans, while the Norwegians filled the ranks of the 15th Regiment. An indication of the magnitude of Wisconsin's contribution can be gained by viewing the Roster of Wisconsin Volunteers, War of Rebellion, 1861-1865, Vol I (available at www.wisconsinhistory.org). For example, the Roster lists 110 volunteer entries from Beaver Dam, 26 from Juneau, 16 from Horicon, and 57 from Waupun. The 8th Wisconsin became known as the "Eagle Regiment" because of a pet bald eagle, named "Old Abe" they carried into battle.

Iron Brigade Home Page. Wisconsins Involvement in the Civil War. Historical Essay The Civil War touched virtually every Wisconsin family.

Wisconsins Involvement in the Civil War

Between 1861-1865, more than 91,000 young men left Wisconsin to fight in the South. And more than 12,000 never returned. Recent immigrants, Yankee blue-bloods, American Indians, and people of color fought side-by-side. Wisconsin women took men's places in the fields and factories, and fortunes were made and lost supplying wartime goods.