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58 Free Professional, Beautiful Website Templates for You. Kahoot! — Kahoot! user guide We’ve created this Kahoot!... 50 Education Technology Tools Every Teacher Should Know About. Technology and education are pretty intertwined these days and nearly every teacher has a few favorite tech tools that make doing his or her job and connecting with students a little bit easier and more fun for all involved.

50 Education Technology Tools Every Teacher Should Know About

Yet as with anything related to technology, new tools are hitting the market constantly and older ones rising to prominence, broadening their scope, or just adding new features that make them better matches for education, which can make it hard to keep up with the newest and most useful tools even for the most tech-savvy teachers.

Here, we’ve compiled a list of some of the tech tools, including some that are becoming increasingly popular and widely used, that should be part of any teacher’s tech tool arsenal this year, whether for their own personal use or as educational aids in the classroom. Social Learning. Digital Citizenship. Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education. Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17).

Curriculum: Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship – Google in Education

The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: 15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers. Google is usually one of the first places students turn to when tasked with an assignment. Whether it’s for research, real-time results, or just a little digital exploration … it’s important they know how to properly Google. Lucky for teachers (and students, of course), Google has a handy set of lesson plans that are just waiting to be unleashed upon the leaders of tomorrow. While I understand there’s a LOT more to research than just Googling, it’s important to note that this is where nearly all students start their research.

Therefore, it’s a critical skill if they’re going to start down the right paths. Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: A Great New Technology Integration Matrix for Teachers. 20 Basic Rules For Digital Citizenship. The definition of digital citizenship has to do with the quality of behaviors that impact the quality of digital content and communities.

20 Basic Rules For Digital Citizenship

To help clarify what that “quality” can look like, knowthenet.org.uk put together the following infographic framed around Dos and Don’ts. While seemingly written for a more general audience than students and educators, the thinking is sound, including “Treat others they way you want to be treated,” “Don’t forget the human behind the screen,” “Listen first, talk later,” and “Use proper grammar.” (Yes, please do.) Overall it’s a bit basic, but it does take the important step of moving beyond rhetoric to offer concrete tips to realize the idea. Digital Literacy and Citizenship Classroom Curriculum.

Teaching Screenagers:Character Education for the Digital Age. Our current technological trajectory promises unfathomable, roller-coaster innovation with no braking system.

Teaching Screenagers:Character Education for the Digital Age

While the ride is exciting, it moves so quickly that we typically don't have time to think about the possible unintended consequences that might accompany it. The result is that we find ourselves unable to effectively respond to hot-button issues like cyberbullying and sexting because they seem to come out of nowhere. What is Digital Citizenship? Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship. "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues.

Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship

Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. Media Awareness Network (MNet)

Media Literacy Links & Resources. Incorporating Media Into the Curriculum (Elementary & Secondary)

Media Literacy Links & Resources

Critical Media Literacy Online CD. Social Media for Kids. Digital Literacy and Citizenship Classroom Curriculum. Connect Safely. Open thinking » 80+ Videos for Tech. & Media Literacy. Update December 3/09: There has been much interest in this list so I have transferred this resource to a wiki. This post will remain, but I would be happy if others contributed to the wiki version found here.

Thanks for your interest in media education. Over the past few years, I have been collecting interesting Internet videos that would be appropriate for lessons and presentations, or personal research, related to technological and media literacy. Here are 70+ videos organized into various sub-categories. These videos are of varying quality, cross several genres, and are of varied suitability for classroom use. Conversation Starters: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 21st Century Learning: 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 21st Century Schools – This is a video prepared by the Department of Children, Schools and Families in the United Kingdom. 17. The 5 Resources Framework - The 5 Resources Model of Critical Digital Literacy. Accelerating Change: What is 21st Century Media Literacy? Unless you're 50 years old or older, your attention has turned away from newspapers, magazines, TV and radio and shifted toward internet and electronic delivery of content.

Accelerating Change: What is 21st Century Media Literacy?

That attention is directed at such diverse areas as using search to find any of the ONE TRILLION sites in Google's index; reading any of the 2.6M articles on Wikipedia; watching some of the 70M+ videos on YouTube; trying to read even a fraction of the 133M blogs; act as one of the 100M users who log on to Facebook daily; or attempt to follow some of the more than 3M tweets sent through Twitter daily. How can a student possibly think critically about the multitude of competing messages and stimuli generated by that flood of content?

How can you teach them to handle it all? Of course, this flood is being generated by both actual media organizations but more often by the audience, formerly known as consumers, who have also become producers of media.