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It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop

Don't Expect Toddlers To Behave Consistently — They Literally Can't. One day, when my oldest daughter was not quite 2, she wouldn’t sit still to let me change her diaper.

Don't Expect Toddlers To Behave Consistently — They Literally Can't

Squirrelly and writhing, she made a game out of staying half naked. She wasn’t fussing about it or anything — in fact, she was giggling maniacally. The problem was that we were running late. Nothing I did seemed to faze her. I tried distracting her with a toy. It was just once, and it was barely even hard enough to register. Once I gathered my wits, it dawned on me that I was punishing my daughter simply for being a goofy, growing, learning, experimenting almost-2-year-old. Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids? Over the past 50-60 years, play time in kids’ lives has been drastically cut.

Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids?

School days and years are longer and parents often schedule enrichment activities for their children instead of giving them space to direct their own play. Children are rarely given the freedom to direct their own activities, leading to a persistent rise in children feeling that they have no control over their lives. And, while correlation doesn’t prove causation, Dr. Peter Gray, who has been studying play for years, says there’s strong evidence that in this case, the decline in play is leading to a rise in depression and acute anxiety among young people.

Which Early Childhood Experiences Shape Adult Life? By Maanvi Singh, NPR Most of us don’t remember our first two or three years of life — but our earliest experiences may stick with us for years and continue to influence us well into adulthood.

Which Early Childhood Experiences Shape Adult Life?

Just how they influence us and how much is a question that researchers are still trying to answer. Two studies look at how parents’ behavior in those first years affects life decades later, and how differences in children’s temperament play a role. The first study, published Thursday in Child Development, found that the type of emotional support that a child receives during their her first three and a half years has an effect on education, social life and romantic relationships even 20 or 30 years later. Page from English in Early Childhood - British Council. I Said I Want the Red Bowl! Responding to Toddlers' Irrational Behavior. Pin It Amelia, told that she can’t have a fifth book before bedtime, shouts: “You are the meanest mommy!

I Said I Want the Red Bowl! Responding to Toddlers' Irrational Behavior

Does my toddler have a short attention span because she won’t sit still for a story? A: It is perfectly normal for toddlers to not sit still very long—period.

Does my toddler have a short attention span because she won’t sit still for a story?

Most don’t like to stay in one place for long now that they can explore in so many new ways—by running, jumping, and climbing. So, an adult’s idea of snuggling on the couch to hear a story may not be the same idea a toddler has for story-time. You may only be able to read or talk about a few pages in a book at a time. Here are some ways to engage active children in reading: Groupe public VIETNAM HOMESCHOOL GROUP. How can parents and teachers best educate young children? What principles can both teachers and parents bring to the education of very young children?

How can parents and teachers best educate young children?

Gillian Craig, who was part of the Learning Time with Shaun and Timmy writing team, explains. As teachers and parents, we follow certain principles in our roles. Often though, these principles overlap and all we need to do is recognise and reinforce these areas. Ask (the right) questions When my daughter came out of her class one day shortly after her course started, I asked her, 'What did you do in class today? '. Carol Dweck: The power of believing that you can improve.

Play to Learn: Discussion. Symbolic play and language development. Open Access Highlights Longitudinal indication for the link between simple symbolic action and symbolic development.

Symbolic play and language development

Simple symbolic actions link to babbling and complex symbolic outputs. Frequency at initiation of babbling associated with initiation of complex symbolic behaviors. Results support a direct-path hypothesis and an indirect one, rather than a dual-path hypothesis. Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain : NPR Ed. Deion Jefferson, 10, and Samuel Jefferson, 7, take turns climbing and jumping off a stack of old tires at the Berkeley Adventure Playground in California.

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain : NPR Ed

The playground is a half-acre park with a junkyard feel where kids are encouraged to "play wild. " David Gilkey/NPR hide caption toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR Deion Jefferson, 10, and Samuel Jefferson, 7, take turns climbing and jumping off a stack of old tires at the Berkeley Adventure Playground in California. The cognitive benefits of play: Effects on the learning brain.

© 2008 - 2014, Gwen Dewar, Ph.D., all rights reserved Science supports many of our intuitions about the benefits of play.

The cognitive benefits of play: Effects on the learning brain

Playful behavior appears to have positive effects on the brain and on a child’s ability to learn. In fact, play may function as an important, if not crucial, mode for learning. Want specifics? Here are some examples. How do I stop my toddler hitting, biting and fighting? (Video) Gemma: “All children will go through a stage probably where they hit or bite or push another child or their parent, so it's nothing to be worried about.

How do I stop my toddler hitting, biting and fighting? (Video)

Children often use their mouths to explore the world around them. They don't understand they might hurt somebody if they hit or bite. Sometimes they're just copying things that they've seen, so it's quite normal they should do it. Sometimes children bite or hit out of frustration. Glenn Doman 5 language – Google Drive. Reggio Emilia – Google Drive. Các blog và trang web về montessori – Google Drive. Mon_Địa lý.pdf. Tài liệu Mon 0-3 – Google Drive.

Kiến thức Mont cơ bản – Google Drive. PP Montessori  – Google Drive. PP Shichida (Nhật) – Google Drive. PP Glenn Doman (Mỹ) – Google Drive. Thai Giáo-Mang Bầu – Google Drive. Ngan Jp. Importance of play for babies & children. Play is more than just fun for babies and children. It’s how they learn, and how they work out who they are, how the world works and where they fit into it. You can read this article in a selection of languages other than English. The importance of play Playing is one of the most important things you can do with your child. The time you spend playing together gives your child lots of different ways and times to learn. Play also helps your child: build confidence feel loved, happy and safe develop social skills, language and communication learn about caring for others and the environment develop physical skills connect and refine pathways in her brain.

Your child will love playing with you, but sometimes he might prefer to play by himself and won’t need so much hands-on play from you. Different types of play Unstructured, free play is the best type of play for young children. This is play that just happens, depending on what takes your child’s interest at the time. Languages other than English. Play in children s development health and well being feb 2012. Page from English in Early Childhood - British Council. Heuristic play. Heuristic play is rooted in young children’s natural curiosity. As babies grow, they move beyond being content to simply feel and ponder objects, to wanting to find out what can be done with them. Toddlers have an urge to handle things: to gather, fill, dump, stack, knock down, select and manipulate in other ways. Household or kitchen utensils offer this kind of activity as every parent knows, and can occupy a child for surprising stretches of time.

When toddlers make an enjoyable discovery – for instance when one item fits into another, or an interesting sound is produced – they often repeat the action several times to test the result, which strengthens cognitive development as well as fine muscle control and hand/eye coordination. In their book, People under Three, Elinor Goldschmied and Sonia Jackson coined the term heuristic play, to explain how to provide a more structured opportunity for this kind of activity. Heuristic play with objects is not a novel idea. Patricia Kuhl: The linguistic genius of babies. Benefits of word repetition to infants: Repeat after me! Parents who repeat words to 7-month-olds have toddlers with larger vocabularies. New research from the University of Maryland and Harvard University suggests that young infants benefit from hearing words repeated by their parents.

With this knowledge, parents may make conscious communication choices that could pay off in their babies' toddler years and beyond. "Parents who repeat words more often to their infants have children with better language skills a year and a half later," said co-author Rochelle Newman, professor and chair of UMD's Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences (HESP).

"A lot of recent focus has been on simply talking more to your child -- but how you talk to your child matters. It isn't just about the number of words. " What Parents Can Gain From Learning the Science of Talking to Kids. The widening education gap between the rich and the poor is not news to those who work in education, many of whom have been struggling to close the gap beginning the day poor children enter kindergarten or preschool.

But one unlikely soldier has joined the fight: a pediatric surgeon who wants to get started way before kindergarten. She wants to start closing the gap the day babies are born. When Dr. Let's Talk. What do babies need in order to learn and thrive? One thing they need is conversation — responsive, back-and-forth communication with their parents and caregivers. This interactive engagement is like food for their developing brains, nurturing language acquisition, early literacy, school readiness, and social and emotional well-being.

A dispiriting number of children don’t get that kind of brain-fueling communication, research suggests. In early childhood policy (and in the wider media), much attention has been paid to the so-called word gap — findings that show that low-income children hear 30 million fewer words, on average, and have less than half the vocabulary of upper-income peers by age three. But putting that alarming number in the spotlight obscures a more critical component of the research, says Harvard Graduate School of Education literacy expert Meredith Rowe: it’s not so much the quantity of words but the quality of the talk that matters most to a child’s development. Why does my toddler love repetition?