background preloader

Rational Thinking

Facebook Twitter

Graham's Hierarchy of Disagreement.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Cancel Edit Delete Preview revert Text of the note (may include Wiki markup) Could not save your note (edit conflict or other problem).

Graham's Hierarchy of Disagreement.svg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Please copy the text in the edit box below and insert it manually by editing this page. Upon submitting the note will be published multi-licensed under the terms of the CC-BY-SA-3.0 license and of the GFDL, versions 1.2, 1.3, or any later version. See our terms of use for more details. Add a note Draw a rectangle onto the image above (press the left mouse button, then drag and release). Save To modify annotations, your browser needs to have the XMLHttpRequest object. [[MediaWiki talk:Gadget-ImageAnnotator.js|Adding image note]]$1 [[MediaWiki talk:Gadget-ImageAnnotator.js|Changing image note]]$1 [[MediaWiki talk:Gadget-ImageAnnotator.js|Removing image note]]$1. How to Disagree.

March 2008 The web is turning writing into a conversation.

How to Disagree

Twenty years ago, writers wrote and readers read. The web lets readers respond, and increasingly they do—in comment threads, on forums, and in their own blog posts. Many who respond to something disagree with it. That's to be expected. The result is there's a lot more disagreeing going on, especially measured by the word. If we're all going to be disagreeing more, we should be careful to do it well. DH0. This is the lowest form of disagreement, and probably also the most common. U r a fag!!!!!!!!!! But it's important to realize that more articulate name-calling has just as little weight. Logic.

Logic (from the Ancient Greek: λογική, logike)[1] has two meanings: first, it describes the use of valid reasoning in some activity; second, it names the normative study of reasoning or a branch thereof.[2][3] In the latter sense, it features most prominently in the subjects of philosophy, mathematics, and computer science.


Logic was studied in several ancient civilizations, including India,[4] China,[5] Persia and Greece. In the West, logic was established as a formal discipline by Aristotle, who gave it a fundamental place in philosophy. The study of logic was part of the classical trivium, which also included grammar and rhetoric. Logic was further extended by Al-Farabi who categorized it into two separate groups (idea and proof). Later, Avicenna revived the study of logic and developed relationship between temporalis and the implication. Logic is often divided into three parts: inductive reasoning, abductive reasoning, and deductive reasoning.

The study of logic[edit] List of fallacies. Formal fallacy. In philosophy, a formal fallacy is a pattern of reasoning that is always wrong.

Formal fallacy

This is due to a flaw in the logical structure of the argument which renders the argument invalid. A formal fallacy is contrasted with an informal fallacy, which may have a valid logical form and yet be unsound because one or more premises are false. Informal logic. Informal logic is associated with (informal) fallacies, critical thinking, the Thinking Skills Movement[6] and the interdisciplinary inquiry known as argumentation theory.

Informal logic

Frans H. van Eemeren writes that the label "informal logic" covers a "collection of normative approaches to the study of reasoning in ordinary language that remain closer to the practice of argumentation than formal logic. "[7] History[edit] The field perhaps became recognized under its current name with the First International Symposium on Informal Logic held in 1978. Bias. Cognitive bias. Some cognitive biases are presumably adaptive.

Cognitive bias

Cognitive biases may lead to more effective actions in a given context.[7] Furthermore, cognitive biases enable faster decisions when timeliness is more valuable than accuracy, as illustrated in heuristics.[8] Other cognitive biases are a "by-product" of human processing limitations,[9] resulting from a lack of appropriate mental mechanisms (bounded rationality), or simply from a limited capacity for information processing.[10] A continually evolving list of cognitive biases has been identified over the last six decades of research on human judgment and decision-making in cognitive science, social psychology, and behavioral economics. Cognitive biases are important to study because "systematic errors" highlight the "psychological processes that underlie perception and judgement" (Tversky & Kahneman,1999, p. 582).

Overview[edit] Bias arises from various processes that are sometimes difficult to distinguish. Types[edit] Among the "cold" biases, List of cognitive biases. Cognitive biases are tendencies to think in certain ways that can lead to systematic deviations from a standard of rationality or good judgment, and are often studied in psychology and behavioral economics.

List of cognitive biases

There are also controversies as to whether some of these biases count as truly irrational or whether they result in useful attitudes or behavior. For example, when getting to know others, people tend to ask leading questions which seem biased towards confirming their assumptions about the person. This kind of confirmation bias has been argued to be an example of social skill: a way to establish a connection with the other person.[6]