Liberal Arts, Philosphy, and Personal Reading

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Fear of Being Useful
Wonky Water Bunk Wonky Water Bunk "Energized" waters of various kinds It's a good bet that neither the vendors who promote "energizing" products, nor the science-challenged people who buy them, have the slightest idea of what the term means, or how its presence can be demonstrated. The answer is that when applied to water, it's nothing but marketing hokum! See also our Energized Water debunking page.
The Natural Productivity Cycle In your personal life, when attending to business or working on side projects, how often do you spend 8 consecutive hours in front of a computer? It doesn’t make sense because we lose the ability to concentrate effectively within a few hours. Everyone goes through alternating periods of high and low mental acuity. There are days when I work on personal projects for well over 8 hours, but the time is always divided into multiple sessions. Why the 9 to 5 Office Worker Will Become a Thing of the Past Why the 9 to 5 Office Worker Will Become a Thing of the Past
Taoism

Ein Sof, or Ayn Sof, (/eɪn sɒf/, Hebrew אין סוף), in Kabbalah, is understood as God prior to His self-manifestation in the production of any spiritual Realm, probably derived from Ibn Gabirol's term, "the Endless One" (she-en lo tiklah). Ein Sof may be translated as "no end", "unending", "there is no end", or infinite. Ein Sof is the divine origin of all created existence, in contrast to the Ein (or Ayn), which is infinite no-thingness. It was first used by Azriel ben Menahem, who, sharing the Neoplatonic view that God can have no desire, thought, word, or action, emphasized by it the negation of any attribute. Of the Ein Sof, nothing ("Ein") can be grasped ("Sof"-limitation). Ein Sof Ein Sof
Kabbalah

Kabbalah

Kabbalah (Hebrew: קַבָּלָה‎, literally "receiving/tradition"; also transliterated Cabala, Qabbālâ etc.; different transliterations now tend to denote alternative traditions[1]) is an esoteric method, discipline, and school of thought that originated in Judaism. A traditional Kabbalist in Judaism is called a Mekubal (Hebrew: מְקוּבָל‎). Kabbalah's definition varies according to the tradition and aims of those following it,[2] from its religious origin as an integral part of Judaism, to its later Christian, New Age, and Occultist syncretic adaptations.
Kabbalah

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