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Voyager Image Gallery: Voyager at Jupiter
Cosmicopia -- Ask Us - Space Physics Moving Around in Space If you are free-floating in the middle of space with no gravitational forces nearby, is it possible for you to turn around by moving any body parts (like hitting yourself in the shoulder or swinging your arms)? Remember that in order to move your body, you must be acted on by an external force (a body at rest remains at rest, according to Newton's Law). If you are stationary in space with nothing around you to push off on, you cannot move yourself by pushing on yourself. But you can twist your body around its center of gravity - you just can't move your center of gravity. On Earth, we can walk forward because we push on the Earth and it pushes back on us. So the answer to your question is yes, you can turn yourself around, but you can't move from where you are.Dr. Cosmicopia -- Ask Us - Space Physics
The Planets From tiny Mercury to distant Neptune and Pluto, The Planets profiles each of the Solar System's members in depth, featuring the latest imagery from space missions. The tallest mountains, the deepest canyons, the strongest winds, raging atmospheric storms, terrain studded with craters and vast worlds of ice are just some of the sights you'll see on this 100-page tour of the planets. Hubble Reborn Hubble Reborn takes the reader on a journey through the Universe with spectacular full-colour pictures of galaxies, nebulae, planets and stars as seen through Hubble's eyes, along the way telling the dramatic story of the space telescope, including interviews with key scientists and astronauts.

Astronomy Now Online

Astronomy Now Online
Astronomy News Browse News Stories 1 to 10 of 6,276 stories Ultra-Bright Young Galaxies DiscoveredJanuary 7, 2014 — Astronomers have discovered and characterized four unusually bright galaxies as they appeared more than 13 billion years ago, just 500 million years after the big bang. Although Hubble has previously ... > full story Rare Eclipsing Double Asteroid DiscoveredJanuary 7, 2014 — Students in an undergraduate astronomy class made a discovery that wowed professional astronomers: a previously unstudied asteroid is actually a pair of asteroids that orbit and eclipse one another. ... > full story

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Astronomy Magazine PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all » This photographer caught a meteor in the constellation Cassiopeia the Queen, and also caught its reflection in the water below. You can see the relatively large W asterism of Cassiopeia just to the left of the meteor’s streak in the sky.