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Ray McGovern

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Ray McGovern on Torture

Government Watch Lists, Ray McGovern and Post-Constitutional America. Ray McGovern is on the State Department’s BOLO list– Be On the Look Out.

Government Watch Lists, Ray McGovern and Post-Constitutional America

The Passion of Ray McGovern Ray McGovern is a hell of a guy. An Army veteran, he worked for the CIA from the Kennedy administration up through the first Bush presidency, preparing the president’s daily intel brief and other important stuff. Along the way, McGovern began to see the fraud and evil of much of the government’s work, and has since become an outspoken critic of the intelligence world and an advocate for free speech. He speaks on behalf of people like Julian Assange, Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden. McGovern is also a very nice person, soft-spoken, serious, kinda looks like your uncle playing Santa Claus, full of fascinating Cold War history. A Wanted Man Ray McGovern is also on the State Department’s BOLO list– Be On the Look Out– one of a series of government watch lists. A Dangerous Man What did McGovern do to end up on Diplomatic Security’s dangerous persons list? An Enemy of the State McGovern v. Current, Ray McGovern (raymcgovern) sur Twitter. Ray McGovern, common dreams.

Ray McGovern's Blogs, Ray McGovern, wikipedia. 11 April 2008, Phoenix, Ariz.

Ray McGovern, wikipedia

Raymond McGovern (born August 25, 1939) is a retired CIA officer turned political activist. McGovern was a CIA analyst from 1963 to 1990, and in the 1980s chaired National Intelligence Estimates and prepared the President's Daily Brief. He received the Intelligence Commendation Medal at his retirement, returning it in 2006 in protest at the CIA's involvement in torture.[1] McGovern's post-retirement work includes commentating on intelligence issues and in 2003 co-founding Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity.

Personal life[edit] Ray McGovern was born in the Bronx in New York City and grew up there. McGovern has been married to Rita Kennedy for 50 years. Career[edit] McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years (1963 to 1990), "routinely presenting the morning intelligence briefings at the White House".[2] His CIA career began under President John F. He worked as an officer for the CIA, where he was responsible for the analysis of Soviet policy in Vietnam. DN! Ray McGovern. Thomas Fingar. Thomas Fingar Charles Thomas Fingar is a professor at Stanford University.

Thomas Fingar

In 1986 Fingar left Stanford to join the State Department. In 2005, he moved to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence as the Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Analysis and concurrently served as the Chairman of the National Intelligence Council until December 2008.[1] In January 2009, he rejoined Stanford University as a Payne Distinguished Lecturer in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.[2] Background[edit] Early life[edit] Education[edit] Fingar received his B.A. in Government and History from Cornell University (1968), and his M.A.(1969) and Ph.D.(1977) in Political Science from Stanford University. Honors and Awards[edit] The US Office of Personnel Management (OPM) awarded Fingar the 2005 Presidential Rank Award for Distinguished Senior Professional.

Dr. "Dr. Those pressing for an attack on Iran in 2008 found themselves fighting uphill. Standing Up to War and Hillary Clinton. This piece was reprinted by OpEdNews with permission or license.

Standing Up to War and Hillary Clinton

It may not be reproduced in any form without permission or license from the source. Source: Consortium News(Originally published Feb. 23, 2011) Former CIA analyst Ray McGovern(image by Consortium News) It was not until Secretary of State Hillary Clinton walked to the George Washington University podium on Feb. 15, 2011, to enthusiastic applause that I decided I had to dissociate myself from the obsequious adulation of a person responsible for so much death, suffering and destruction.

I was reminded of a spring day in Atlanta almost five years earlier when then-Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld strutted onto a similar stage to loud acclaim from another enraptured audience. Introducing Rumsfeld on May 4, 2006, the president of the Southern Center for International Policy in Atlanta highlighted his "honesty. " With the others at Clinton's talk, I stood.