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Google adds in-depth articles to results. Google is rolling out a new addition to search results called “In-depth articles” ( “To understand a broad topic, sometimes you need more than a quick answer.

Google adds in-depth articles to results

Our research indicates perhaps 10% of people’s daily information needs fit this category — topics like stem cell research, happiness, and love, to name just a few. That’s why over the next few days we’ll be rolling out a new feature to help you find relevant in-depth articles in the main Google Search results.” The articles appear as a block of three at the bottom of your results, if you only display 10 results per page, or in the middle of the page if you display more.

As Google says, they appear if your search is fairly broad and they do not appear for every query. My search on thorium reactor started with a Wikipedia article at the top, which seems all too often to be the default. Further down the page was a block of three “in-depth” articles from Wired, Cosmos Magazine and Nature.

How useful are these articles? How To Make Good Use Of Google's Search Operators. Some of you might not have the slightest clue what an operator is, in terms of using a search engine.

How To Make Good Use Of Google's Search Operators

Luckily enough, both Google and MakeUseOf offer some pretty good examples of how to use them with the world’s most popular search engine. In plain English, an operator is a tag that you can include within your Google search to make it more precise and specific. With operators, you’re able to display results that pertain only to certain websites, search through a range of numbers, or even completely exclude a word from your results. Google URL Shortener. Now you see it, now you don’t. April is going to be a very busy month for me this year.

Now you see it, now you don’t

As well as speaking at conferences I am also giving six full day workshops so am having to prepare the presentations, handouts and notes well in advance. When it comes to the Google sessions the material the delegates receive never matches exactly what they see on their screens during the practicals. That’s par for the course where Google is concerned and it’s a great way of getting across to people how Google messes up enhances search results. The problem I had yesterday, and am still having this morning, is that Google seems to have dumped me into several major ‘live experiments’ and results keep changing second by second. The consequence is that it is impossible for me to pull together a set of consistent screen shots but I, and the delegates, will just have to live with that. If you don’t know what Google’s ‘live experiments’ are the YouTube video at will enlighten you.

How search works – sort of. Google Scholar author fail. Eight months after setting up my Google Scholar author profile and “claiming” my papers I have received my first alert.

Google Scholar author fail

If you only use Google Scholar ( to search for papers you may not be aware that if you have published papers you can set up a Google Scholar author profile and add those papers to your profile. Google then creates a page showing a graph of when and how often your papers were cited and generates an H-index and i10-index for you. This only covers the papers that Google Scholar has in its database and there are serious gaps in its coverage for some sectors. On the other hand, it does sometimes include articles, web sites and blog postings that are not peer reviewed in the conventional way. This can be a good thing because it may pick up some very useful grey literature. Another feature of Scholar is that you can create alerts for keyword searches, new papers by an author or new citations to their articles. This was confirmed when I clicked on the ‘Cite’ option.

Google makes it easier for kids to find porn. Not what you expect is it?

Google makes it easier for kids to find porn

However, it happens to be true. Google recently revamped the way in which they display images on the screen to make it easy and quicker to view them. Selecting an image now brings it centre stage so that it can be seen more easily, and you can flip through them just using the keyboard. They talk about it in more depth in their blog. However, what they're also doing is ironically trying to make it harder to view adult images. 3 simple search operators to use with Google. Power Searching with Google. Google Now: behind the predictive future of search. 291inShare Jump To Close For decades, visions of the future have played with the magical possibilities of computers: they'll know where you are, what you want, and can access all the world's information with a simple voice prompt.

Google Now: behind the predictive future of search

That vision hasn't come to pass, yet, but features like Apple's Siri and Google Now offer a keyhole peek into a near future reality where your phone is more "Personal Assistant" than "Bar bet settler. " The difference is that the former actually understands what you need while the latter is a blunt search instrument. Google search to get more personal. Google search is about to get even more personal – possibly.

Google search to get more personal

If you are signed in to your Google account and search, Google includes and highlights content from people in your networks. This has been available for some time but a couple of months ago Google launched a field trial that added your Gmail to the search mix, and a few days ago they added documents from Drive. MsFreckles - Frecklify Your Google Search. Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. Many librarians are still unwilling to fully embrace Google Scholar as a resource.

Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no.

Michelle C. Hamilton, Margaret M. Janz and Alexandra Hauser investigate whether Google Scholar has the accuracy, authority and currency to be trustworthy enough for scholars. One of the reasons science librarians prefer subscription-based databases (ie SciFinder or Web of Science) or those offered as a service of the government (ie PubMed) is the nonstandard behavior of Google Scholar when compared to those resources. Google Scholar is not a bibliographic index, it is a search engine.

Google reducing the number of search results. Noticed anything different about your Google results recently?

Google reducing the number of search results

It might be down to the fact that instead of seeing 10 results on the screen, you're now quite probably only seeing 7. I really don't see the point of doing this, although their reasoning is that if the search is specific enough to warrant less results, that's what you'll get. Yet another irritating Google feature. There was a time when Google would aggregate pages from the same website in your search results.

Yet another irritating Google feature

There might be just a couple of entries for the site with a “More from….” link next to the result. Alternatively you might see a mini sitemap: This has the advantage that you are not swamped with results from a single website but are given instead a variety of options that might provide you with a better answer to your question. Not any more. Beating Google into submission – top tips. Oh what fun we had beating Google into submission on June 28th! This advanced Google workshop was held at Reading University and covered some of the new goings on at Google (no more ‘ANDing’ for search terms, personalisation of results) as well as the some of the established techniques for making Google behave itself.

The following is what the group came up with at the end of the day as their collaborative top tips for persuading Google to run your search the way you want it run. How Much Do Social Signals Play Into Google Rankings? If there's been one thing that tends to get me going, it's when people in the industry start talking about social signals. In particular, Google using them as a ranking factor. Is this truly the case? Or do a lot of folks have it wrong? Google Knowledge Graph. Google looks as though it's returning to its roots of search with the introduction of the Knowledge Graph. It's only just rolling out, and I haven't got it yet, so I'm using their video to introduce it: What this means is that Google can understand the things in your search query, so we're slowly getting towards the concept of semantic searching.

It's also widening out the opportunity to look more broadly (or indeed more narrowly) at a particular subject. When you run a search, you'll get to see something like this: Google+ hangouts for libraries. Google+ hangouts have many benefits for a library or information service, and I thought it was time to take a little more of a look at what the functionality is, together with ways in which it can be used. So - first steps - what exactly is a Google+ hangout?

I'm presuming that you have at least a passing vague understanding of Google+ - their take on social media networking; if you've got a Google account then you'll already have a G+ account (just click on the little +YourName in the top left hand corner of the black Google bar that appears on the screen when you're using Google functionality. A 'hangout' is simply a way that you can have of chatting with up to 10 colleagues, real time, via video. Who Googled You? This Website Knows. After a date, a pitch or a job interview, there's a good chance you're going to get Googled. Online reputation manager BrandYourself now helps you figure out who is searching for your name. The startup, which helps individuals control Google results for names through SEO, launched a new feature on Tuesday that shows users where visitors to their BrandYourself profiles work and where they're located. BrandYourself built a database of organizations' publicly-available IP addresses in order to create the feature.

They use it to match IP addressees of profile visitors with the companies that own those addressses. Visitors most frequently reach BrandYourself profiles through Google, but the feature works the same way if visitors reach a user's profile from another search engine or website. New Site Helps You Control Google Search Results for Your Name. Google Gives Search a Refresh. The Link Prospector's Guide to the Tilde. Google Knowledge Graph Could Change Search Forever. 2lingual Google Search. How To Switch Off Google's Search Plus Your World Permanently - Google, How to, Social search.

Why Google Search Plus is a disaster for search. Making Public Data More Accessible on the Web. Google Advanced Search Showdown. Beating Google into Submission. How to Use Google Search More Effectively [INFOGRAPHIC] Search using your terms, verbatim. Behind the simplicity of Google search is a complex set of algorithms that expands and improves the query you’ve typed to find the best results.

Automatic spelling correction ([vynal] to “vinyl”) and substituting synonyms (matching [pictures] to “photos”) are just two examples of the improvements we make. In most cases, Google’s algorithms make things better for our users - but in some rare cases, we don’t find what you were looking for. In the past, we provided users with the “+” operator to help you search for specific terms. However, we found that users typed the “+” operator in less than half a percent of all searches, and two thirds of the time, it was used incorrectly. A couple of weeks ago we removed the “+” operator, encouraging the use of the double quotes, which are more likely to be used correctly. Dear Google, stop messing with my search. I have been complaining for several months that Google does not always “AND” your search terms and delivers results that do not contain all of your terms, or their synonyms, in the page itself or in links to the page.

More Google search insanities. The Google+ Cheatsheet Is a Quick Reference To Using Google+ Good to Know – Google. Google Search Algorithm Change For Freshness To Impact 35% Of Searches; Twitter Firehose Remains Off. Google Blog: Giving you fresher, more recent search results.