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Mohalla Clinics

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Mohalla clinics: in India, the internet permits new model of healthcare for the poor. Mohalla clinics: Delhi's mohalla clinics proving popular with residents: Lancet - Times of India. NEW DELHI: The Delhi government's 'mohalla clinics' scheme which aims to provide better primary care coverage in the national capital is proving "popular" with residents, offering "key advantage" to the beneficiaries, according to a report published in The Lancet journal.

mohalla clinics: Delhi's mohalla clinics proving popular with residents: Lancet - Times of India

The clinics opened as part of a flagship programme by the AAP government launched in July last year. The initiative is aimed at expanding the reach and range of health services in unserved and underserved areas such as slums, the report said. Former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan Commends Delhi Government's Mohalla Clinics. New Delhi: Former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan has lauded the Delhi government for providing free primary health care through Mohalla Clinics -- an initiative that is "consistent with the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) goal" of the World Health Organization.

Former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan Commends Delhi Government's Mohalla Clinics

In a letter to Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal, Mr Annan has termed the scheme "successful and impressive" and said, "...you have scaled up the provision of universal free health services, most notably in providing free primary healthcare services through your new Mohalla Clinics". "We understand that this initiative is proving very successful and we commend you on this impressive achievement," said Mr Annan, who heads "The Elders", an independent organisation promoting peace, justice and human rights worldwide.

The Delhi government plans to build some 1,000 Mohalla Clinics across the city. After Kofi Annan, another world leader praises AAP govt’s mohalla clinics. Mohalla clinics may not just bring universal healthcare (UHC) to Delhi’s residents, it may also partially solve the problem of anti-microbial resistance, former World Health Organisation director general and Gro Harlem Brundtland said on Thursday.

After Kofi Annan, another world leader praises AAP govt’s mohalla clinics

“The healthcare reforms being undertaken in Delhi strike me as an excellent strategy to build an exclusive health system in India and bring UHC to its people,” Brundtland, who is the former Prime Minister of Norway, said. The praise for the project came at the ongoing Prince Mahidol Award Conference at Bangkok, Thailand after a presentation by Delhi health minister Satyendar Jain. This is the second time in a week that the project has received international acclaim. Former secretary general of United Nations Kofi Annan had written to Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal on January 25 to commend the mohalla clinic project. The project could be a model for states trying to move towards UHC, he had written. Read more. Kofi Annan lauds AAP’s Mohalla Clinics project, suggests reforms.

Former Secretary-General of United Nations (UN), Kofi Annan, has commended Delhi government’s flagship Mohalla Clinic project that is aimed at providing free primary healthcare to city residents closer home.

Kofi Annan lauds AAP’s Mohalla Clinics project, suggests reforms

In a letter on January 25 to Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal, in capacity as chair of The Elders, an organisation of independent global leaders founded by Nelson Mandela, Annan also shared suggestions that could help reform the project and “provide further important lessons for other Indian states embarking on the UHC (Universal Health Care) journeys”. Mohalla Clinics have been one of the flagship projects of the AAP government. Even as the Opposition parties accused AAP government of having “failed” to deliver on its electoral promises, Kejriwal government has been showcasing these clinics as a unique achievement and a reflection of AAP’s model of governance.

Kofi Annan praises mohalla clinics. Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan has lauded the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government’s mohalla clinics initiative for providing free primary healthcare.

Kofi Annan praises mohalla clinics

In a letter to Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal, Mr. Annan said that the initiative was “consistent with the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) goal” of the World Health Organisation. ‘We commend you’ Mr. Annan wrote that the mohalla clinic scheme was ‘successful and impressive’ and added: “You have scaled up the provision of universal free health services, most notably in providing free primary healthcare services through your mohalla clinics. Mr Annan heads ‘The Elders’, an independent organisation promoting peace, justice and human rights worldwide. “We are aware that your administration has implemented a series of health reforms consistent with the UHC goal,” Mr. SCMP: New Delhi’s high-tech clinics help ease overburdened public health system.

For asthma sufferer Mohan Lal, regular visits to the Indian capital’s hospitals were a nightmare of waiting in endless queues in sweltering corridors that swarm with mosquitoes.

SCMP: New Delhi’s high-tech clinics help ease overburdened public health system

But a spotless and air-conditioned clinic boasting innovative diagnostic technology and sharply-dressed doctors has just opened in Lal’s neighbourhood, bringing health care into the 21st century. For Lal, who needs regular treatment for his asthma, the sparkling free clinic and 100 others developed by the New Delhi government in mostly low-income neighbourhoods are a revelation. Like most of the city’s millions of poor, he was used to the traditional state-run hospitals, often stretched to breaking point, where patients face long delays for even minor treatment and are forced to share beds. “The hospital is far from my house, I had to walk quite a bit and then I had to wait in long queues for hours in smelly, sweaty hallways,” he said, grimacing at the memory. “Your blood report is not good. “It’s still early days.

Dawn.com: Sick throng Delhi's new, high-tech clinics. NEW DELHI: For asthma sufferer Mohan Lal, regular visits to the Indian capital's hospitals were a nightmare of waiting in endless queues in sweltering corridors that swarm with mosquitoes.

Dawn.com: Sick throng Delhi's new, high-tech clinics

But a spotless and air-conditioned clinic boasting innovative diagnostic technology and sharply-dressed doctors has just opened in Lal's neighbourhood, bringing healthcare into the 21st century. For Lal, who needs regular treatment for his asthma, the sparkling free clinic and 100 others developed by the New Delhi government in mostly low-income neighbourhoods are a revelation. Like most of the city's millions of poor, he was used to the traditional state-run hospitals, often stretched to breaking point, where patients face long delays for even minor treatment and are forced to share beds.

"The hospital is far from my house, I had to walk quite a bit and then I had to wait in long queues for hours in smelly, sweaty hallways," he said, grimacing at the memory. 'Can't afford treatment' SCMP: Neighbourhood clinics bring healthcare to India’s poor. Whenever Arif Wazir got gastrointestinal problems, he used to visit Ram Manohar Lohia, a 1½ -hour bus ride away and the nearest government hospital to Todapur, north Delhi.

SCMP: Neighbourhood clinics bring healthcare to India’s poor

Bursting at the seams, Wazir, a slum dweller who sells shoes on a street stall, waited for five to six hours to see the doctor, in sweltering corridors filled with the chaos of many other anxious people. Getting there cost him 200 rupees (HK$23), more than a quarter of his daily wage. The only bonus: the hospital’s treatment is free. But the most recent time he fell ill, a relative told him to visit a mohalla clinic in Todapur, a bold new experiment by the Delhi government to take good and free primary healthcare to the doorsteps of the poor. “Mohalla” means neighbourhood or community.

When Wazir walked in at 9.30am, he found a clean, air-conditioned room. “I was so surprised. Neither of these two options suit the poor. At the Todapur clinic, Richpal is having a busy day. Richpal has Pinkie’s records on his tablet. WaPo: What New Delhi’s free clinics can teach America about fixing its broken health care system. Chicago Tribune: Are India's free health clinics a model for urban America? Rupandeep Kaur, 20 weeks pregnant, arrived at a medical clinic looking fatigued and ready to collapse.

Chicago Tribune: Are India's free health clinics a model for urban America?

After being asked her name and address, she was taken to see a physician who reviewed her medical history, asked several questions, and ordered a series of tests including blood and urine. These tests revealed that her fetus was healthy but Kaur had dangerously low hemoglobin and blood pressure levels. HuffPost: What New Delhi's Free Clinics Can Teach America About Fixing its Broken Health Care System. Rupandeep Kaur, 20 weeks pregnant, arrived at a medical clinic looking fatigued and ready to collapse.

HuffPost: What New Delhi's Free Clinics Can Teach America About Fixing its Broken Health Care System

After being asked her name and address, she was taken to see a physician who reviewed her medical history, asked several questions, and ordered a series of tests including blood and urine. These tests revealed that her fetus was healthy but Kaur had dangerously low hemoglobin and blood pressure levels.