Philosophy

Facebook Twitter
Cartesian Dualism Cartesian Dualism René Descartes's illustration of dualism. Inputs are passed on by the sensory organs to the epiphysis in the brain and from there to the immaterial spirit. In philosophy of mind, dualism is the position that mental phenomena are, in some respects, non-physical,[1] or that the mind and body are not identical.[2] Thus, it encompasses a set of views about the relationship between mind and matter, and is contrasted with other positions, such as physicalism, in the mind–body problem.[1][2] Ontological dualism makes dual commitments about the nature of existence as it relates to mind and matter, and can be divided into three different types:
Interactionalism René Descartes's illustration of dualism. Inputs are passed on by the sensory organs to the epiphysis in the brain and from there to the immaterial spirit. In philosophy of mind, dualism is the position that mental phenomena are, in some respects, non-physical,[1] or that the mind and body are not identical.[2] Thus, it encompasses a set of views about the relationship between mind and matter, and is contrasted with other positions, such as physicalism, in the mind–body problem.[1][2] Ontological dualism makes dual commitments about the nature of existence as it relates to mind and matter, and can be divided into three different types: Substance dualism asserts that mind and matter are fundamentally distinct kinds of substances.[1]Property dualism suggests that the ontological distinction lies in the differences between properties of mind and matter (as in emergentism).[1]Predicate dualism claims the irreducibility of mental predicates to physical predicates.[1] Interactionalism
Interactionism (philosophy of mind) - Wikipedia, the free encycl Examples: You are outside walking and a wild animal suddenly crosses your path. This affects your mind resulting in your face showing fear and you step back. Interactionism (philosophy of mind) - Wikipedia, the free encycl
Conservation of energy Conservation of energy In physics, the law of conservation of energy states that the total energy of an isolated system cannot change—it is said to be conserved over time. Energy can be neither created nor destroyed, but can change form, for instance chemical energy can be converted to kinetic energy in the explosion of a stick of dynamite. A consequence of the law of conservation of energy is that a perpetual motion machine of the first kind cannot exist. That is to say, no system without an external energy supply can deliver an unlimited amount of energy to its surroundings.[2] History[edit] Gottfried Leibniz
J. Kevin O'Regan Laboratoire de Psychologie Expérimentale, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France Talk given at Bressanone on 24 Jan 2001 sensory phenomenology, O'Reagan,K, 2001 sensory phenomenology, O'Reagan,K, 2001
J. Kevin O'Regan