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Where Our Food Crops Come From

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Article With Explanation of "What Are Food Crops?" Food crops fall into roughly six categories: Grains, beans and legumes, seeds and nuts, vegetables, fruit, herbs and spices. The term "food crops" refers to the world's major food supply derived from plants; a crop assumes human intervention through agriculture.

Food crops fall into roughly six categories: Grains, beans and legumes, seeds and nuts, vegetables, fruit, herbs and spices

In the main, food crops consist of grains, legumes (including dried beans), seeds and nuts, vegetables, fruit, herbs and spices, beverage plants such as tea and coffee, and so forth. Some foods, like sea vegetables, are food crops in terms of gathering rather than deliberate agriculture, although undoubtedly the best sources of such foods are well cared for resources in terms of laws to prevent over-harvesting, polluting, and licensing access. Grains[edit] The top ten most valuable crops in the world are: Corn, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Yams, Cassava, Soybeans, Sorghum, Plantains, Wheat, and Rice. Explanation of how farmers grow and cultivate crops properly.

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Explanation of how farmers grow and cultivate crops properly

A hive of bees flies over 55,000 miles to bring you one pound of honey? A honeybee can fly 15 miles per hour (24 kilometers per hour)? Globalization of the food system and the Green Revolution have decreased global agricultural biodiversity. A disturbing study conducted by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) back in 1999 revealed that since the 1900s, 75% of agricultural crops have been lost, spiking a decline in plant variety and putting at risk what FAO defines as ‘agrobiodiversity.’

Globalization of the food system and the Green Revolution have decreased global agricultural biodiversity

In turn, farmers worldwide abandoned their fruitful, diverse varieties for the higher yielding crops, creating a more uniform and less diverse agricultural landscape. “From the 4% of the 300,000 known edible plant species,” the FAO document states, “only 150 to 200 are used by humans.” Today, 75% of the global food supply comes from only 12 plant species—particularly rice, maize, and wheat.

In a 2013 interview with BBC, Colin Khoury, a scientist from the Centre for Tropical Agriculture based in Colombia, stated that, “over the past 50 years, we are seeing that diets around the world are changing and becoming more similar—what we call the ‘globalized diet’.” 1. Map of Worldwide Crops and Their Geographical Origins. [video] Origins of Food Across the World. Video Explaining the Mexican Origins of Corn.

The Origins of The Most Widely Consumed Food Crop in the World: Rice. The origin of rice is buried in obscurity and the depths of time.

The Origins of The Most Widely Consumed Food Crop in the World: Rice

Till today, we do not know when it was first discovered and domesticated and perhaps this is one fact we will never come to know. In the long and turbulent history of the human race, one of the most important developments that led to the development of civilizations was the domestication of rice, for this one single variety of grain has fed and nourished more people over a longer period of time than any other crop. Rice or Oryza Sativa (as botanists prefer to call it) is not a tropical plant but is still associated with a wet, humid climate.

It is generally believed that the domestication of rice began somewhere in the Asian arc. [Open url to view in its entirety] Article detailing the sociological origins of how humans began domesticating and a list of different crop growing regions on the planet and the crops grown there. Research article detailing the importance for genetic study of crops for sustainability purposes and the details on different types of genetically modified food. Scientists successfully mapped the 32,000 genes of corn and seek to use the newly mapped genome to cultivate huge varieties of the crop. The complex corn genome—coming in at a hearty two billion base pairs (compared with the human genome's 2.9 billion base pairs)—has been mapped by more than 150 researchers, who worked for years to decipher the grain's genetic code.

Scientists successfully mapped the 32,000 genes of corn and seek to use the newly mapped genome to cultivate huge varieties of the crop

It's the most complicated plant genome to be deciphered to date and promises to increase the efficiency of the crop itself. "It sets up our ability to start using three million to five million years of diversity" rather than a few hand-selected traits to improve production, says Ed Buckler of Cornell University and a collaborator on the research. "That's going to allow us to make lots of improvements," he says. [click link to read] Section "Rise of our Food Crops" explains the evolution of angiosperms and states "It was the angiosperms that ultimately provided us with most of our food crops and their emergence predated the appearance of our species."

How researchers use genomics to predict bread quality and accelerate wheat variety development. Better bread: How researchers use genomics to predict bread quality and accelerate wheat variety development Thursday, June 30, 2016 For each breeding line, a quantity of wheat grain is milled and baked into a small experimental loaf, from which total volume is measured as one assessment of the performance of that line. | Download this photo.

How researchers use genomics to predict bread quality and accelerate wheat variety development

MANHATTAN — A team of breeders and geneticists at Kansas State University and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, or CIMMYT, has come up with a new approach to determine if new varieties of bread wheat will have what it takes to make better bread. With funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development's Feed the Future Initiative, the team is using DNA markers to predict important quality traits for bread wheat, such as dough strength and loaf volume. The Next Green Revolution will either be pro-GMO or seek better alternatives that are ecologically aware and more in tune with natural biodiversity and gene pools. The genes of all living things on Earth—including the sunflower, a valuable oil crop—consist of varying sequences of four chemical compounds: adenine, thymine, cytosine, and guanine, abbreviated as A, T, C, and G.

The Next Green Revolution will either be pro-GMO or seek better alternatives that are ecologically aware and more in tune with natural biodiversity and gene pools.

By identifying genes and manipulating them, scientists hope to create new crops that will help us face the challenges of global warming and population growth. By Tim Folger. The annual production and average yield of 10 of the most imporant crops in the world. Article detailing the inadequacies of food distribution to people worldwide and how our food distribution systems fail to accommodate to the starving populations of Earth. Enough food is produced worldwide to feed all the people in the world (Leathers, p. 133).

Article detailing the inadequacies of food distribution to people worldwide and how our food distribution systems fail to accommodate to the starving populations of Earth

However, despite this alarming truth, nearly 1 billion people are suffering from chronic hunger today. There are a wide range of factors that contribute to this problem, but perhaps one of the most significant is poor food distribution. Figure 1. Amount of Food Produced, How Used and How Much Received. The amount of food calories being produced fulfills and exceeds the minimum amount needed per person.

PDF pamphlet explaining the transportation of food crops worldwide contributes to pollution and commends the sale of local crops over imported crops. Graphic Depicting Percent of Land in the US devoted to Specific Crops, 2007. [section "Impact on Crops"] Climate Change causing higher temperatures, higher levels of carbon dioxide, and higher frequency of extreme weather has a negative impact on crop yield. On This Page: Overview Agriculture is an important sector of the U.S. economy.

[section "Impact on Crops"] Climate Change causing higher temperatures, higher levels of carbon dioxide, and higher frequency of extreme weather has a negative impact on crop yield.

The crops, livestock, and seafood produced in the United States contribute more than $300 billion to the economy each year.[1] When food-service and other agriculture-related industries are included, the agricultural and food sectors contribute more than $750 billion to the gross domestic product.[2]