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The First English Dictionary, 1604: Robert Cawdrey's Table Alphabeticall, Simpson, Cawdrey. English is one of the most complicated languages to learn, and its constantly evolving vocabulary certainly doesn’t help matters.

The First English Dictionary, 1604: Robert Cawdrey's Table Alphabeticall, Simpson, Cawdrey

For centuries, men and women have striven to chronicle and categorize the expressions of the English language, and Samuel Johnson is usually thought to be their original predecessor. But that lineage is wrong: Robert Cawdrey published his Table Alphabeticall in 1604, 149 years before Johnson’s tome, and it is now republished here for the first time in over 350 years. This edition, prepared from the sole surviving copy of the first printing, documents Cawdrey’s fascinating selection of 2,543 words and their first-ever definitions. Cawdrey subtitled his dictionary “for the benefit of Ladies, Gentlewomen, and other unskilled folk,” for his aim was not to create a comprehensive catalog, but rather an in-depth guide for the lesser educated who might not know the “hard usual English wordes, borrowed from the Hebrew, Greeke, Latine, or French.”

A Barrel of Monkeys: A Compendium of Collective Nouns for Animals, Fanous. Compiled by Samuel Fanous Distributed for Bodleian Library, University of Oxford With a Foreword by Susie Dent and Illustrations by Thomas Bewick.

A Barrel of Monkeys: A Compendium of Collective Nouns for Animals, Fanous

Glossary. Agape: Greek for Christian love; contrast with erotic love (eros) or familial love (storge).

Glossary

Also, communal meals in early Church (love feasts) commemorating the Last Supper. alms: Charitable relief provided to those in need. From Latin eleemosyna, alms; via Greek eleēmosynē, pity or alms, from eleos, mercy, pity, compassion. Shares roots with adj. eleemosynary, meaning charitable, which dates c. 1620. Alms in English dates c. 700. altruism: Unselfishness. Nine “corrections” of English that make smart people look silly. “This Underwood built an empire.

Nine “corrections” of English that make smart people look silly

Now you go build one of your own,” says Frank Underwood’s father on House of Cards, while giving Frank his portable Underwood typewriter. Founded in 1895, the New York City-based typewriting company produced America’s first popular typewriter. But by 1959, the iconic typewriting manufacturer was no longer in American hands. It had been taken over by the then-leader of the industry, Italian manufacturer Olivetti (link in Italian). Founded in 1908 by electrical engineer Camillo Olivetti, the company was the first Italian manufacturer of typewriters. The Difference Between The Hyphen,  En Dash And Em Dash, Explained. Cutthroat compounds in English morphology. A houseboat is a type of boat; a boathouse is a type of house.

Cutthroat compounds in English morphology

This illustrates a common pattern in English morphology: the rightmost part of a compound (houseboat) is usually the ‘head’. In other words it’s the centre or larger category, functionally equivalent to the overall compound, and what precedes it (houseboat) modifies or specifies it. So we say English is ‘right-headed’. But the semantic relationship between the parts can’t be inferred automatically from their arrangement, as this charming/disarming Bizarro cartoon by Dan Piraro shows: Right-headedness is a feature of Germanic languages.

Editor and historical linguist Brianne Hughes studies a remarkable subset of exocentric compounds called agentive and instrumental exocentric verb-noun (V-N) compounds. Cutthroat compounds name things or people by describing what they do. [poster of Robert Bresson’s classic film Pickpocket (1959) via this collection] Cutthroats are freely productive in Romance languages, which have a V.O. Affect vs. Effect Grammar Rules. Knowing when to use affect or effect in a sentence can be a challenge.

Affect vs. Effect Grammar Rules

These words are examples of homonyms. Homonyms are words that are similar, but have very different meanings. Other examples of homonyms are two/to/too, accept/except, and there/their/they're. Meaning of Affect and Effect. Is the letter Y a vowel or a consonant? The letter Y can be regarded as both a vowel and a consonant.

Is the letter Y a vowel or a consonant?

In terms of sound, a vowel is 'a speech sound which is produced by comparatively open configuration of the vocal tract, with vibration of the vocal cords but without audible friction...', while a consonant is 'a basic speech sound in which the breath is at least partly obstructed'. The letter Y can be used to represent different sounds in different words, and can therefore fit either definition. The 100 Most Beautiful Words in English. Source Image source Like this: Like Loading...

The 100 Most Beautiful Words in English

Related. Robyn LaRue. Get the Word of the Day - twitterpated. Get the Word of the Day - ides. Get the Word of the Day - obstreperous. Get the Word of the Day - cognoscenti. Get the Word of the Day - bromide. Get the Word of the Day - divulgate. Jejune - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - tumescent. Get the Word of the Day - parvenu. Alexithymia - Word of the Day.

Flummox - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - amphigory. Get the Word of the Day - genesis. Get the Word of the Day - melee. Get the Word of the Day - peripeteia. Get the Word of the Day - espial. Get the Word of the Day - birling. Get the Word of the Day - anomia. Get the Word of the Day - wayworn. Get the Word of the Day - minimax. Get the Word of the Day - donnybrook. Snickersnee - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - penitent. Timocracy - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - shibboleth. Bible Dictionary Shibboleth definition river, or an ear of corn.

Get the Word of the Day - shibboleth

The tribes living on the east of Jordan, separated from their brethren on the west by the deep ravines and the rapid river, gradually came to adopt peculiar customs, and from mixing largely with the Moabites, Ishmaelites, and Ammonites to pronounce certain letters in such a manner as to distinguish them from the other tribes. Thus when the Ephraimites from the west invaded Gilead, and were defeated by the Gileadites under the leadership of Jephthah, and tried to escape by the "passages of the Jordan," the Gileadites seized the fords and would allow none to pass who could not pronounce "shibboleth" with a strong aspirate. This the fugitives were unable to do. Get the Word of the Day - too-too. Crackerjack - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - tommyrot.

Get the Word of the Day - mollify. Get the Word of the Day - astraphobia. Get the Word of the Day - ogdoad. Get the Word of the Day - Fata Morgana. Affront - Word of the Day. "… so we repaired to a publick-house, took a friendly glass, and thus parted.

Affront - Word of the Day

" — Peter Drake, Amiable Renegade: The Memoirs of Captain Peter Drake, 1671–1753, 1960 "… Warren repaired to the dining alcove off the kitchen … and ate dinner with Nina and the children, discussing their schoolwork and events of the day. " — Kevin Starr, Embattled Dreams, 2002 We are all familiar with the verb repair used as a synonym of fix. But today's word, while it is a homograph and a homophone of the more familiar repair, is a slightly older and unrelated verb. Get the Word of the Day - eleemosynary. Get the Word of the Day - helix. A.Word.A.Day. A.Word.A.Day with Anu Garg Lorelei If you have ever called someone brainy an Einstein, or someone clever and perceptive a Sherlock (sometimes sarcastically), you have made use of an eponym. An eponym is a word coined after a person, from Greek epi- (upon) + -onym (name). The English language has thousands of them, for men and women, from fact and fiction, obscure and well-known, home-grown and borrowed from other languages.

This week we’ll feature five assorted eponyms. (LOR-uh-ly) noun: A dangerously seductive woman. In German legend Lorelei was a nymph who sat on a rock of the same name on the Rhine river. “In fact, Peter the Publican’s daughter is his Lorelei, enticing customers into his establishment, then flirting brazenly just to keep them drinking.” See more usage examples of Lorelei in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A.Word.A.Day. Heliolatry - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - auroral. Ambisinister - Word of the Day. Mellifluous - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - argonaut. Get the Word of the Day - polysemy. Chiliad - Word of the Day. Mondegreen - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - psephology. Saturnalia. Aug 10, 2015 This week’s theme Words related to space This week’s words Saturnalia Art: Antoine Callet (1741-1823) A.Word.A.Day with Anu Garg When I find myself unduly worried about something, I look up.

If I had my way, I would make an Astronomy 101 course mandatory for everyone, especially for those running for office. That may not happen any time soon, but a small step would be to replace astrology columns in newspapers and magazines with an astronomy one. PS: For a gentle introduction to astronomy, check out this excellent video series by Phil Plait: Crash Course Astronomy. saturnalia (sat-uhr-NAY-lee-uh) noun: A time of unrestrained revelry. From Latin Saturnalia (relating to Saturn). “It is a sort of holiday, a saturnalia, a time of licence when restrictions on liberty can be cast aside.” See more usage examples of saturnalia in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary. I like the pluralism of modernity; it doesn't threaten me or my faith.

Nabob - Word of the Day. Olio - Word of the Day. Get the Word of the Day - entelechy. A.Word.A.Day. A.Word.A.Day with Anu Garg gehenna (gi-HEN-uh) noun: 1. Hell. 2. From Latin gehenna, from Greek Geenna, from Hebrew ge-hinnom (hell), literally, the valley of Hinnom, or from ge ben Hinnom (valley of the son of Hinnom). “We lived peacefully and happily, but now our house has turned into a Gehenna.” “Just as I was preparing to set the back deck on fire to get some warmth in the house, all Gehenna broke loose on the news.”

See more usage examples of gehenna in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary. A.Word.A.Day. Allegiant - Word of the Day. Capriole - Word of the Day. Sobriquet - Word of the Day. Dragoman - Word of the Day. Prolegomenon. Get the Word of the Day - piebald. A.Word.A.Day. Jun 30, 2015 This week’s theme What’s a letter here or there between friends? This week’s words A.Word.A.Day with Anu Garg sorb (sorb) verb intr.: 1. So what’s the difference between absorption and adsorption, besides a turned-around letter b? Back-formation from absorb, from Latin absorbere, from ab- (away) + sorbere (to suck). A.Word.A.Day. Get the Word of the Day - otiose. Get the Word of the Day - cavil. Contradistinctive.