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OoVoo Video Call, Text and Voice App Review. 15 Great Apps to Play with Your Tweens and Teens. Tap here for our Free App! Get all our media picks, personalized for your kids. No thanks Jump to navigation "Best of" Lists "Best of" lists Get age-appropriate ideas and inspiration for every interest: Poll How did you first hear about Common Sense Media? Word of mouth 12% (1494 votes) Web search 57% (7151 votes) Common Sense Media app 1% (108 votes) Partner site (Comcast, Netflix, etc.) 3% (436 votes) TV ads 3% (370 votes) Facebook or Twitter 1% (168 votes) News or blog article 2% (208 votes) My school / teacher 6% (787 votes) None of the above 14% (1811 votes) Total votes: 12533 Learning ratings Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

Find out more Share this List SaveSign In or Join to save for later 15 Great Apps to Play with Your Tweens and Teens age 7+ 50 Apps All Kids Should Play At Least Once. Tap here for our Free App! Get all our media picks, personalized for your kids. No thanks Jump to navigation "Best of" Lists "Best of" lists Get age-appropriate ideas and inspiration for every interest: Poll How did you first hear about Common Sense Media? Word of mouth 12% (1084 votes) Web search 58% (5236 votes) Common Sense Media app 1% (77 votes) Partner site (Comcast, Netflix, etc.) 3% (315 votes) TV ads 3% (273 votes) Facebook or Twitter 1% (110 votes) News or blog article 2% (154 votes) My school / teacher 6% (526 votes) None of the above 15% (1320 votes) Total votes: 9095 Learning ratings Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

Find out more Share this List SaveSign In or Join to save for later 50 Apps All Kids Should Play At Least Once csm_app age 2+ Learning Potential - Homepage | Learning Potential, Australian Government. Sneaky Camera Apps Parents Should Know About. Hairy Maclary from Donaldson's Dairy. 21 Apps That Teach Kids Real-Life Skills. Creating with Children and iPad Apps. Apps for a Preschool Tablet Program | Mel's Desk. Until I get to a write-up of our pilot tablet program (children and adults paired on a tablet, with both guided and free-play app time), here is a quick list of the apps we (me and my colleague Laurie Anne) are highlighting this first go-round. We looked for apps that would have strong connections to the ECRR five practices: reading, writing, singing, talking, and playing, and offer lots of opportunities for that great parent-and-child sharing and joint engagement.

Laurie Anne did a lot of the leg work for this and we relied heavily on Common Sense Media and the Children’s Technology Review for help selecting. Drawing Pad (Android & iOS) A Parents Choice Gold Award, this app from Darren Murtha Design offers a great selection of art materials to draw with–markers, pencils, crayons, stamps, etc, all with distinct characteristics. There’s wide color selection, and a toolbox of ways adjust your lines and marks–for example from skinny to wide, from transparent to opaque. Musical Me! Behavioral Therapy | Fumbling Thru Autism. The following story is a detailed account of my daughter Beth’s history and challenges with imitation. During the process of teaching my daughter patty-cake, I observed that imitation is easier for Beth when both of us are facing the same direction.

If you have any experience with this issue, I would appreciate hearing from you within a post I started on my Facebook page ( It is early October, 2012, and I wake up mentally sorting through things I want to do with my daughter Beth. We are finally able to work together, after a tough transition (for background see Going it Alone, and I Need a Miracle worker, My mind wanders to imitation. Neurotypical children learn social interaction and how to do new things by imitating others, and imitation is arguably a core deficit for children with autism (1). Before Autism Took Hold: Beth Playing Patty-Cake 1. We are one step closer. 2. Scholastic Kids Press Corps Website Review. StoryBuilder App Review. Storybird Website Review. Digital Storytelling with the MY:24 App Tickets | Eventbrite. Invalid quantity. Please enter a quantity of 1 or more. The quantity you chose exceeds the quantity available. Please enter your name. Please enter an email address. Please enter a valid email address.

Please enter your message or comments. Please enter the code as shown on the image. Please select the date you would like to attend. Please enter a valid email address in the To: field. Please enter a subject for your message. Please enter a message. You can only send this invitations to 10 email addresses at a time. $$$$ is not a properly formatted colour.

Please limit your message to $$$$ characters. $$$$ is not a valid email address. Please enter a promotional code. Sold Out Unavailable You have exceeded the time limit and your reservation has been released. The purpose of this time limit is to ensure that registration is available to as many people as possible. This option is not available anymore. Please read and accept the waiver. All fields marked with * are required. Click OK to confirm your order. Reading Comprehension Apps, Games, and Websites. Close(x) Don’t Miss Out You’re all set! Look out for our weekly updates soon. Connect with us Jump to navigation "Best of" Lists "Best of" lists Get age-appropriate ideas and inspiration for every interest: Poll Did this specific Top Picks list help you decide to do any of the following? Let your child watch/play/read/listen to a particular media title 41% (546 votes) NOT let your child watch/play/read/listen to a particular media title 14% (184 votes) Buy, rent, or download a particular media title 23% (314 votes) Did not impact my decision 22% (303 votes) Total votes: 1347 About our rating system ON: Content is age-appropriate for kids this age.PAUSE: Know your child; some content may not be right for some kids.OFF: Not age-appropriate for kids this age.NOT FOR KIDS: Not appropriate for kids of any age.

Find out more Learning ratings Share this List FavoriteSign In or Sign Up to add favorites Reading Comprehension Apps, Games, and Websites Browse Reading Comprehension Apps, Games, and Websites Tales2Go csm_app. YALSA's Teen Book Finder for Android & iOS. YALSA's Teen Book Finder is a free online database and app to help teens, parents, librarians and library staff, educators, and anyone who loves YA literature access nearly 4,000 titles recognized YALSA's awards and lists on their smartphone.

Have an Android phone? Download the Android version now! Have an iPod Touch or an iPhone? Download the iOS app now! App features include: a homepage featuring three titles from the database, refreshed each day the ability to search for books by author, title, award/list year, genre, by award, and by book list a Find It! Button, powered by the OCLC WorldCat Search API, that will show users where to find the book in a nearby library a Favorites button, to create an individualized booklist the ability to share books from the Teen Book Finder on Twitter and Facebook The android and iOS versions of the app are funded by the Dollar General Literacy Foundation.

Have a question or comment about the app or want to report a bug? Parents' Choice Award Winners: MOBILE. Kids Educational Computer Games & Activities. App Lists | Little eLit. Literary Hoots: Favorite Apps for Early Readers. Whether you're a parent looking to further your child's literacy skills or a librarian looking to add some educational variety to a program, apps can be a really useful resource. If, that is, you know what to look for! A lot of what I'm about to share comes from a movement towards integrating new media into the children's library. My coworker went to a whole conference about it, and then discussed it with us librarians. I think it's great stuff for anyone who works with kids. You can learn more about this movement on Little eLit. Basically, with the right apps and adult interaction, new media can be supremely beneficial to a young child's education.

Adult/parent interaction is key, however. But first: how to find the best apps for early learners. Red in Bed by Daniel Logeman ($0.99, iOS & Android) A reading-based app The colors of the rainbow wake up and get out of bed to color the world, except for Red who feels sick. Endless Alphabet by Originator ($6.99 on iOS & free for Android)