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History Shock

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Future Shock is what happens to the old as they witness a rapidly changing world. History shock is what happens to their children looking backwards.

One can take for granted the current technology and culture, but we should remember that much of the objects, people, and infrastructure around us is the products of different era's, since this hurried world moves on before it has time to pack them away, laying down new tracks right over the old ones. The Singularity. THE SINGULARITYThe Singularity has already happened.

The Singularity

We missed it. TIL The site where Julius Caesar was assassinated by the Roman senate in 44 BC is now a no-kill shelter for homeless cats : todayilearned. How Chicago Reversed the Course of Its River Is Less Shocking Than Why. 8 Things That Happened In History Way More Often Than Everybody Thinks. The Most Complex Borders in Europe: Why Do We Have Nations? 5 Basic Truths Everyone Agrees On (Are Shockingly New Ideas) For every hour you spent in a history class, you've probably watched a hundred hours of movies and TV shows that take place in the Old West, or Ancient Rome, or whatever era Game Of Thrones takes place in (the Renaissance?

5 Basic Truths Everyone Agrees On (Are Shockingly New Ideas)

We'll have to look it up). The problem is, those stories are always told with modern audiences in mind -- meaning, they include some very recent inventions that you just assume go back thousands of years. But, just as nobody had heard of a doorknob until after the Civil War, a look at the actual past reveals that ... #5. Doctors Weren't Respected As Professionals Until The 20th Century Jupiterimages/Stockbyte/Getty Images When you were a child, your parents' greatest hope was that you might defy expectation and become someone as highly respected as a doctor, and their greatest fear was that you might wind up making a living selling your body on a street corner for smack, or running an improv troupe.

Franz Anton MaulbertschThey could also give you a quick trim. #4. . #3. The (Secret) City of London Part 1: History. Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Infrastructure (HBO) The Troubled History Of The Foreskin. I have something to say about this from experience.

The Troubled History Of The Foreskin

My well-meaning, devout, and slightly naive mother decided to have me circumcised when I was born. The doctor, who was later sued by somebody else for professional negligence, screwed up the cut. All my mother remembered from that time was that the doctor having to fix some kind of screw-up, and that was that. What he had actually done was nicked the underside of my Buck's fascia, the tissue surrounding the erectile tissue that gives the penis its shape when erect. It probably seemed fine early on, but as the cut healed the scar tissue that formed caused my erection to bend sharply at about a 100 degree angle (i.e., almost a right angle).

I didn't realize anything was wrong with me until I was a teenager And then once I knew, not knowing what had happened in my delivery, I kept it secret hoping the problem would resolve itself. This is not without side effects. Today I have no career, no money, no friends, and no love. This 1750 BC Babylonian Tablet Is An Ancient Customer Service Complaint. A Rare Look at the Tunnels Under San Francisco. In the early ’90s my friends and I used to tape flashlights to the handlebars of our bikes and go riding around in underground storm drain tunnels.

A Rare Look at the Tunnels Under San Francisco

There was a whole network of these tunnels under the city that sat empty for most of the year. We would go for miles snaking up and down the sides of the tubes, clapping and yelling to see how far our echoes would carry, eventually popping out in some other part of the city covered in cobwebs and bat guano. When the tubes got too small, we laid down on skateboards and kept going. If we found a flooded part, we taped garbage bags around our legs and crossed our fingers. The Cities That Live Behind Walls. While you're in the area of Carcassonne, take a day trip 180 km east, you will find Aigues-Mortes, or as we can it "Carcassonne on the beach", a walled city rebuildt by Saint Louis in the 13th century, to become the only port in the mediterranean for the kingdom of France in this era, and the embarkation point for two crusades.

The Cities That Live Behind Walls

SExpand It is also one of the first cities with a grid plan, making it look like a medieval New York, with it's streets and avenues crossing neatly. The (Secret) City of London, Part 1: History. The Gorgeous Typeface That Drove Men Mad and Sparked a 100-Year Mystery. Tufts Magazine / fall 2013. Last December, when Adam Lanza stormed into the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, with a rifle and killed twenty children and six adult staff members, the United States found itself immersed in debates about gun control.

Tufts Magazine / fall 2013

Another flash point occurred this July, when George Zimmerman, who saw himself as a guardian of his community, was exonerated in the killing of an unarmed black teenager, Trayvon Martin, in Florida. That time, talk turned to stand-your-ground laws and the proper use of deadly force. The gun debate was refreshed in September by the shooting deaths of twelve people at the Washington Navy Yard, apparently at the hands of an IT contractor who was mentally ill. Such episodes remind Americans that our country as a whole is marked by staggering levels of deadly violence. Pop or Soda? Why Region Is More Important Than You Think. Where you live in the United States determines a hell of a lot more than whether 'coke' means Coca-Cola or 'every single carbonated beverage.' It can also mean the difference between sauce on your pizza or nothing, the difference between honor killings or, uh, not honor killings, the difference between a time machine and an ...

Pop or Soda? Why Region Is More Important Than You Think

ATM? Yep. But, it goes deeper than how you pronounce "ruin" and "grocery" or whether you call toilet-papering a house "TPing" or "rolling" a house. It may be that we aren't all even living in the same nation. On today's podcast Cracked editors Jack O'Brien, Kristi Harrison and Jason Pargin discuss America's crazy regional differences, and talk with Colin Woodard (author of 'American Nations') about his claim that the fifty American states are actually eleven distinct nations.

The Fonts That Come With Your Computer Are Older Than You Ever Thought. Obama orders review of U.S. energy infrastructure. Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Nuclear Weapons (HBO) Year 2000 problem. The (French) sign reads "3 January 1900" instead of "3 January 2000" The Year 2000 problem (also known as the Y2K problem, the Millennium bug, the Y2K bug, or simply Y2K) was a problem for both digital (computer-related) and non-digital documentation and data storage situations which resulted from the practice of abbreviating a four-digit year to two digits.

Year 2000 problem

In 1997, The British Standards Institute (BSI) developed a standard, DISC PD2000-1,[1] which defines "Year 2000 Conformity requirements" as four rules: No valid date will cause any interruption in operations.Calculation of durations between, or the sequence of, pairs of dates will be correct whether any dates are in different centuries.In all interfaces and in all storage, the century must be unambiguous, either specified, or calculable by algorithmYear 2000 must be recognized as a leap year It identifies two problems that may exist in many computer programs. Background[edit] Programming problem[edit] The need for bit conservation[edit] Are Hong Kong & Macau Countries?

20th Century History

The history we're built on.