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IBM's TrueNorth processor mimics the human brain. IBM today unveiled what it's calling the world's first neurosynaptic computer chip, a processor that mimics the human brain's computing abilities and power efficiency.

IBM's TrueNorth processor mimics the human brain

A million spiking-neuron integrated circuit with a scalable communication network and interface. Inspired by the brain’s structure, we have developed an efficient, scalable, and flexible non–von Neumann architecture that leverages contemporary silicon technology.

A million spiking-neuron integrated circuit with a scalable communication network and interface

To demonstrate, we built a 5.4-billion-transistor chip with 4096 neurosynaptic cores interconnected via an intrachip network that integrates 1 million programmable spiking neurons and 256 million configurable synapses. Chips can be tiled in two dimensions via an interchip communication interface, seamlessly scaling the architecture to a cortexlike sheet of arbitrary size. The architecture is well suited to many applications that use complex neural networks in real time, for example, multiobject detection and classification.

With 400-pixel-by-240-pixel video input at 30 frames per second, the chip consumes 63 milliwatts. Computers are nowhere near as versatile as our own brains. Brain-inspired chip fits 1m 'neurons' on postage stamp. 8 August 2014Last updated at 03:40 ET By Jonathan Webb Science reporter, BBC News The chips can also be connected together to provide even more computational power Scientists have produced a new computer chip that mimics the organisation of the brain, and squeezed in one million computational units called "neurons".

Brain-inspired chip fits 1m 'neurons' on postage stamp

They describe it as a supercomputer the size of a postage stamp. Each neuron on the chip connects to 256 others, and together they can pick out the key features in a visual scene in real time, using very little power. The design is the result of a long-running collaboration, led by IBM, and is published in the journal Science. "The cumulative total is over 200 person-years of work," said Dr Dharmendra Modha, the publication's senior author. He told BBC News the processor was "a new machine for a new era". Next generation Continue reading the main story “Start Quote.

DARPA SyNAPSE

Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence - Page 4. Picture a person reading these words on a laptop in a coffee shop.

Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence - Page 4

Corelets – A New Paradigm for Cognitive Computing. Cognitive Computing Programming Paradigm: A Corelet Language for Composing Networks of Neurosynaptic Cores. DARPA, IBM Neurosynaptic Chip and Programming Language Mimic the Brain. DARPA, IBM Neurosynaptic Chip and Programming Language Mimic the Brain Engineering is often inspired by nature—the hooks in velcro or dermal denticles in sharkskin swimsuits.

DARPA, IBM Neurosynaptic Chip and Programming Language Mimic the Brain

Then there’s Darpa's SyNAPSE project. Not content with current computer architecture, SyNAPSE is building a new kind of computer based on the brain. Last year, scientists working on SyNAPSE announced they’d simulated 100 trillion synapses from a monkey brain on Sequoia, one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers. Now, instead of simply writing brain-inspired algorithms for traditional systems, they’ve invented an entirely new "neuromorphic" chip, True North, and an accompanying programming language to build applications on it. IBM’s Dharmendra S. The way computers currently manipulate information, shuttling it back and forth between memory and processor, is named after the early computer scientist John von Neumann.

But the classical approach isn't well suited for creative, adaptive intelligence.

Dharmendra S. Modha

Corelets – A New Paradigm for Cognitive Computing. IBM Scientists Show Blueprints for Brainlike Computing. Research: A new era of computing: cognitive systems - United States. The Cognitive Systems Era. New Era of Cognitive Computing. NSF Science of Learning Center. The ambitious mission of the DARPA sponsored SyNAPSE (Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics) project, launched in early 2009, is to “investigate innovative approaches that enable revolutionary advances in neuromorphic electronic devices that are scalable to biological levels.”

NSF Science of Learning Center

DARPA has awarded funds to three prime contractors: HP , HRL , and IBM . Members of CELEST within the Department of Cognitive and Neural Systems at Boston University are on subcontracts with both HP and HRL. HP's principal investigator is Greg Snider , of the Information and Quantum Systems Lab . HRL's principal investigator is Naryan Srinivasan of the Information and Systems Science Office. A National Science Foundation Science of Learning Center.

Abductive reasoning. Abductive reasoning (also called abduction,[1] abductive inference[2] or retroduction[3]) is a form of logical inference that goes from an observation to a hypothesis that accounts for the observation, ideally seeking to find the simplest and most likely explanation.

Abductive reasoning

In abductive reasoning, unlike in deductive reasoning, the premises do not guarantee the conclusion. One can understand abductive reasoning as "inference to the best explanation".[4] The fields of law,[5] computer science, and artificial intelligence research[6] renewed interest in the subject of abduction. Diagnostic expert systems frequently employ abduction. History[edit] The American philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914) first introduced the term as "guessing".[7] Peirce said that to abduce a hypothetical explanation from an observed circumstance is to surmise that.

Charles Sanders Peirce. Charles Sanders Peirce (/ˈpɜrs/,[9] like "purse", September 10, 1839 – April 19, 1914) was an American philosopher, logician, mathematician, and scientist, sometimes known as "the father of pragmatism".

Charles Sanders Peirce

He was educated as a chemist and employed as a scientist for 30 years. Today he is appreciated largely for his contributions to logic, mathematics, philosophy, scientific methodology, and semiotics, and for his founding of pragmatism. An innovator in mathematics, statistics, philosophy, research methodology, and various sciences, Peirce considered himself, first and foremost, a logician. He made major contributions to logic, but logic for him encompassed much of that which is now called epistemology and philosophy of science. He saw logic as the formal branch of semiotics, of which he is a founder. Life[edit] Peirce's birthplace. Peirce suffered from his late teens onward from a nervous condition then known as "facial neuralgia", which would today be diagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia. Artificial Brains - The quest to build sentient machines.

Institute of Neuromorphic Engineering. Applications: Neural Interface » The neurophotonic interface: stimulating neurons with light. Applications » Neural Interface The neurophotonic interface: stimulating neurons with light PDF version | Permalink.

Applications: Neural Interface » The neurophotonic interface: stimulating neurons with light

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