background preloader

Civil Forfeiture

Facebook Twitter

Highway Robbery Gets Presidential Seal of Approval. Donald Trump is going after one of the few issues proven to be a unifier across party lines: civil asset forfeiture.

Highway Robbery Gets Presidential Seal of Approval

The Equitable Sharing Program provides local law enforcement with a loophole, allowing them to continue civil asset forfeiture. This legal tool allows law enforcement to seize money and physical property from those merely suspected of criminal behavior. Unfortunately, there is no conviction requirement, meaning confiscation can occur before suspects have been given the opportunity to defend themselves in court. Jeff Sessions and the Thuggery of Asset Forfeiture. One of the unfortunate features of Washington is that people often wind up in places that bring out their worst behaviors.

Jeff Sessions and the Thuggery of Asset Forfeiture

The classic example is Jack Kemp, who did great work as a member of Congress to push a supply-side agenda of low marginal tax rates and less double taxation. Indeed, it’s no exaggeration to say that the Reagan tax cuts were made possible by Kemp’s yeoman efforts. There's Hope for Ending Civil Asset Forfeiture. AZ Senate OKs racketeering charges for riots. The Arizona Senate on Wednesday approved a bill that makes participating in or helping organize a protest that turns into a riot an offense that could lead to criminal racketeering charges, legislation Republican backers say is needed to crack down on violent protesters.

AZ Senate OKs racketeering charges for riots

The measure adds rioting to the organized crime statutes and says an overt act isn't needed to prove conspiracy to riot, meaning someone could be charged who wasn't involved in the actual riot. All 17 Senate Republicans supported the measure and all 13 Democrats voted no. It now heads to the House. Senate Bill 1142 would allow prosecutors to seize a person's assets in addition to enhanced criminal charges.

Sen. Egged on by Sheriffs, Trump Endorses Police Practice of Taking Property from Innocent People. Photo Credit: arindambanerjee / Shutterstock.com During a brief meeting with sheriffs where President Trump was apparently introduced to the complex subject of civil asset forfeiture, he offered to destroy the career of the Texas State Senator seeking to reform the system.

Egged on by Sheriffs, Trump Endorses Police Practice of Taking Property from Innocent People

Whether this was an actual threat or a poor and misguided attempt at humor, its aim was unmistakably to chill reform efforts. It appeared Trump did not know anything about civil asset forfeiture prior to the meeting, and after he got a one-sided lesson from the law enforcement community, he predictably gave it his full-throated endorsement. Fleece Force: How Police And Courts Around Ferguson Bully Residents And Collect Millions. PASADENA HILLS, Mo. -- “Lacee Scott?”

Fleece Force: How Police And Courts Around Ferguson Bully Residents And Collect Millions

The judge called. The 23-year-old rose from a hard black plastic chair, walked past the fireplace and stood before the table at the front of the living room. From the outside, the house is barely distinguishable from others on the street -- brick, three bedrooms, built in 1948. Over the entrance, however, there is a sign identifying it as City Hall. Law Enforcement as Revenue Stream. After the financial class melted down the world economy, local governments faced an obvious reduction in their revenues.

Law Enforcement as Revenue Stream

As the economy recovered under a Democrat President, the Republicans held onto or gained power in many state governments, such as my own adopted state of Florida. With laudable consistency with their professed ideology, Republicans routinely cut taxes for businesses, the well off and sometimes even almost everyone. Richland's $4.1 million police station funded by civil forfeiture. IMPRESSIVE: Richland, Miss.’s $4.1 million police station was paid for entirely by civil forfeiture.

Richland's $4.1 million police station funded by civil forfeiture

By Steve Wilson | Mississippi Watchdog The Mississippi city of Richland has a new $4.1 million police station, a top-level training center and a fleet of black-and-white Dodge Charger police cars. All of it was paid for through civil forfeitures of property and cash seized during traffic stops of what police say were suspected drug runners on Interstate 20. “If Someone is Bringing Drugs into Mar-a-Lago, Police Could Try to Seize it.” The comment was startling, even for President Donald Trump.

“If Someone is Bringing Drugs into Mar-a-Lago, Police Could Try to Seize it.”

In a meeting with county sheriffs this week, the president suggested he would “destroy” the career of a Texas state senator who wants to curtail the ability of law enforcement to seize money, vehicles, and property suspected of being used in crime. A Texas sheriff had complained that the unnamed legislator’s bill would be a boon to drug dealers. Later in the meeting, Trump told Dana Boente, the acting attorney general, to put the practice, called asset forfeiture, “back in business.” The exchange prompted laughs in the room and outrage on the Internet, but it also exposed an important policy divide among two groups traditionally associated with Trump’s rise: law enforcement and conservatives concerned about government overreach.

“If someone is bringing drugs into Mar-a-Lago,” Levin said, “police could try to seize it.”