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Right to water, gender and health promotion

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Content of the rights and principles « Rights to Water and Sanitation. The normative content categories of the rights to water and sanitation serve to describe the issues that states need to take into account in realising the rights to water and sanitation.

Content of the rights and principles « Rights to Water and Sanitation

How to use the normative content of the rights The content categories as described below serve as guidance in assessing whether water and sanitation services are compliant with the human rights to water and sanitation. They cannot provide for standards that apply to every situation – as every individual situation is unique. For example: A regulation that subscribes the standards on the design of toilet facilities for schools might be entirely rights compliant for 99,99% of the schools – but fail to be compliant with the human right to sanitation in one particular school, as one student is not able to access the toilet because of a specific disability.

For this particular school, a different standard should be applied. Availability Physical accessibility Acceptability. Gender aspects water sanitation. Briefing Note How can water sanitation and hygiene help realise womens rights and gender equality. Enhancing gender equality post2015 the role of WASH. 30A-S6-P1-Christine_VerheidenACC. WSP-gender-water-sanitation. UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa - Gender - Gender and water, sanitation and hygiene(WASH) Gender and water, sanitation and hygiene(WASH) Throughout Africa women and girls are the main providers of household water supply and sanitation, and also have the primary responsibility for maintaining a clean home environment.

UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa - Gender - Gender and water, sanitation and hygiene(WASH)

The lack of access to safe water and sanitation facilities therefore affects women and girls most acutely. About 157 million people in the Eastern and Southern Africa region (ESAR) are not connected to a clean and safe water distribution system, and thus need to use external water sources. Around 247 million people have no access to improved sanitation. In countries such as Eritrea, Ethiopia and Somalia, well over half of the population has to practise open defecation. Key issues The burden of fetching drinking water from outdoor sources falls disproportionately on girls and women. In several countries in the region (Lesotho, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Kenya and Ethiopia) collecting water takes longer than 30 minutes for more than a quarter of the population. Finca2. Water, Sanitation and Gender. The Terminology (Adapted from SUSANA-WG12 2009) Gender identifies the social relationships between women and men.

Water, Sanitation and Gender

In these, power differences play a major role. Gender is socially constructed; gender relations are contextually specific and often change in response to altering circumstances (MOSER 1993). Class, age, race, ethnicity, culture, religion and urban/rural contexts are also important underlying factors of gender relations. Gender equality is the equal visibility, opportunities and participation of women and men in all spheres of public and private life; often guided by a vision of human rights, which incorporates acceptance of equal and inalienable rights of women and men.

Gender and Water. In-Depth: Running Dry: the humanitarian impact of the global water crisis. “The world’s water resources are our lifeline for survival, and for sustainable development in the twenty-first century.” - United Nations Secretary General, Kofi Annan, 2005 NAIROBI, 20 September 2006 (IRIN) - “The world’s water resources are our lifeline for survival, and for sustainable development in the twenty-first century. […] We need to free women and girls from the daily chore of hauling water, often over great distances.

In-Depth: Running Dry: the humanitarian impact of the global water crisis

We must involve them in decision-making on water management. We need to make sanitation a priority. This is where progress is lagging most.” In his statement in March 2005, one week before the start of the International Water for Life Decade, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan stressed the importance of involving women and girls in water-management policy. One goal of the decade is to halve the number of people without access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015.

Un_water_policy_brief_2_gender. International Decade for Action 'Water for Life' 2005-2015. Gender, Class, and Access to WaterThree Cases in a Poor and Crowded Delta. O direito humano à água. No dia 28 de julho, a Assembléia Geral das Nações Unidas declarou “o direito à água potável, limpa e segura, e ao saneamento como um direito humano que é essencial para o pleno gozo da vida e de todos os direitos humanos.” (1) Isso veio de surpresa; não por a resolução ter sido adotada, mas porque significa que até agora o acesso à água doce, limpa e segura, NÃO tinha sido reconhecido como um dos mais básicos direitos de cada ser humano!

O direito humano à água

Dito o anterior, é claro que nós damos as boas vindas a essa declaração, que consideramos um marco para abordar os problemas que atualmente enfrentam quase 900 milhões de pessoas no mundo todo, que não têm acesso à água limpa- e muitas mais que poderiam enfrentar o mesmo destino no futuro próximo. Também damos as boas vindas ao fato de a resolução apelar para os Estados e as organizações internacionais “a fim de intensificarem os esforços para providenciar água potável segura, limpa, física e economicamente acessível, e saneamento para todos.”