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Etowah Alabama

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287(g) MOA - Etowah County Sheriff's Office (ECSO) Eight Deputies from the Etowah County Sheriff's Office begin 287 (g) immigration enforcement training. July 22, 2008 Gadsen, AL Eight Deputies from the Etowah County Sheriff's Office begin 287 (g) immigration enforcement training Rigorous 4-week training at Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Charleston, SC GADSDEN, Ala. - Deputies from the Etowah County Sheriff's Office in Alabama began a rigorous four-week training program today under U.S.

Eight Deputies from the Etowah County Sheriff's Office begin 287 (g) immigration enforcement training

Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE's) "287(g) program. " The training is being held at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Charleston, S.C. The four weeks of training is the next required step in the 287(g) authorization process following the memorandum of agreement between the Etowah County Sheriff's Office and the U.S. The four-week course provides in-depth training on various enforcement topics, including: immigration law, intercultural relations, and how to use DHS databases to help positively identify criminals and immigration violators.

"We look forward to our partnership with the U.S. Occupy Birmingham v ICE: Project Thunderbiscuits. On December 3rd Occupy Birmingham is planning an action at the Etowah County Detention Facility.

Occupy Birmingham v ICE: Project Thunderbiscuits

We will travel to 827 Forrest Ave, Gadsden to raise our voices in outrage at the treatment of men and women non-citizens, incarcerated and forced into contracted labor in order to earn the several thousand dollar cost of their own deportation; at which time they may have no secure expectation that upon return to specific country of origin or even with the same party to the same location as immediate family members. These practices are largely obscured from public view through information control systems by Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the Department of Homeland Security. As part of my response and in preparation for December's direct action, beginning tonight I will hold education sessions for interested on Occupiers on information awareness and practical strategies for investigating one's Masters.

We are in this together. We all we got. DNAUSCIS.jamaica@dhs.gov. 100294.pdf. g0040656.doc. Transfers of ICE Detainees from the Etowah County Jail. Transfers of ICE Detainees from theEtowah County JailGadsden, AlabamaTable 1: Transfers During the most recent 12 month period for which data are available, a total of 1,572 detainees were transferred by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) from the Etowah County Jail where they had been temporarily housed to other facilities.

Transfers of ICE Detainees from the Etowah County Jail

The average stay for these individuals before their transfer was 31 days. The use of this facility for the temporary housing of federal immigration detainees was arranged through an intergovernmental service agreement (IGSA) under which payments by ICE to another governmental agency are made for housing federal detainees. Additional information about the arrangement, including whether a private company may operate the facility for the government, was not available at the time this report was posted. Transfers made up 63 percent of the 2,482 detainees who in one way or another left this facility during the last 12 months.

DHS Begins Review of Deportation Cases, Issues Awaited Prosecutorial Discretion Guidelines. Today, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) directed ICE attorneys to begin a review process of current immigration cases pending before immigration courts in order to close or dismiss those cases warranting prosecutorial discretion.

DHS Begins Review of Deportation Cases, Issues Awaited Prosecutorial Discretion Guidelines

The attorneys also received additional guidance on how to apply discretion in certain low priority cases. At the same time, DHS announced new training modules for all ICE field agents on prosecutorial discretion. The package of initiatives are a follow up to ICE Director John Morton’s June 17th memo which describes how, when, and why ICE officials should exercise prosecutorial discretion in immigration cases. By reviewing these pending and incoming immigration cases—a process slated to last two months—DHS hopes to relieve some of the backlog and stop diverting resources from low priority cases and focus more attention on deporting high-priority criminals. There are currently 300,000 current cases pending before immigration courts. How Will DHS Continue to Partner on Existing State Enforcement Programs Given Legal Challenge to Alabama’s Law? Today, several newspapers reported on DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano’s statement that the federal government is not going to help Alabama implement its new immigration law, leaving many to wonder how the federal government will continue running existing state and local immigration enforcement programs like Secure Communities.

How Will DHS Continue to Partner on Existing State Enforcement Programs Given Legal Challenge to Alabama’s Law?

On one hand, the federal government has sued Alabama claiming that its immigration law (HB 56) is unconstitutional. On the other, the federal government regularly partners with state and local police agencies to identify unauthorized immigrants for potential deportation. Secretary Napolitano now faces the difficult decision of what DHS will do with unauthorized immigrants in Alabama who may have been picked up under the new law. At the same time, state immigration laws like Alabama’s requires local authorities to verify individual’s immigration status “where reasonable suspicion exists” by contacting the federal government (ICE). Photo by MDGovpics.